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Serbia: Ethnic Dress

Jasna Bjeladinović

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In its rich creative textiles, its role in everyday life and in providing ethnic identity, as well as its visual and aesthetic values, ethnic dress is one of the most valuable and beautiful creations of the cultural heritage of the Serbs. Serb ethnic dress is known mostly due to preserved collections of clothing sets from the nineteenth century and the first decades of the twentieth century and is characterized by a great variety of forms, trimmings, ornaments, and colors. Its splendor is obvious

Geography and Climate: Southeast Europe

Liz Mellish

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Southeast Europe is predominantly mountainous, with steep valleys and flat plains; in the early twenty-first century it is occupied by Greece, Albania, Macedonia, Kosovo, Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Slovenia, Romania, Moldova, and Bulgaria. The geography here has always strongly influenced dress. Areas near trade routes had greater access to raw materials. The climate varies from continental in the inland and more northern areas to Mediterranean in coastal areas and south

Serbia: Urban Dress, 1830 to 1941

Mirjana Menković

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

At the beginning of the nineteenth century, many Serbs, especially in the towns, adopted Oriental, more precisely Levantine, types of dress. The Turkish authorities, in their desire to impose their culture as a universal model throughout the Ottoman Empire, did not object to their non-Muslim subjects’ adoption of their cultural patterns, including their style of dress. This was one way to achieve a unified general model within Ottoman society, a society that was widely diversified in terms of the

Serbia: Urban Dress, 1945 to Twenty-First Century

Maja Studen Petrovic

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

After the end of World War II in 1945, Serbia joined five other republics to form the Democratic Federal Yugoslavia, which received its last official name, the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, in 1963. The Communist takeover resulted in radical changes of the social system, because it was initially based on the Soviet model. The new age was also marked by cultural, educational, and scientific reorganization in line with Socialist standards, accompanied by propaganda clearly colored by id

Fashion in Belgrade, 1918 to 1941

Bojana Popović

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In the wake of World War I, Serbia became part of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes (from 1929, the Kingdom of Yugoslavia), and its capital city, Belgrade, was proclaimed the capital of this new state, which was ruled by the Serbian Karadjordjevic dynasty. Despite economic and political tensions, the kingdom kept pace with the process of modernization that was in progress in the rest of postwar Europe, and Belgrade’s appearance and the routines of its inhabitants were changing very quick

Official Dress, Military Uniforms, and Europeanizing Fashion Influences in Serbia

Čedomir Vasić

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The history of the Serbian people and the Serbian state in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, following centuries of foreign (Turkish) domination, was marked by efforts to establish national institutions of the European type in order to align with Western civilization. Making public servants wear uniforms following European models played a very important role in these efforts: Apart from introducing new styles of dress, new rules of conduct, and a new system of values, it contributed signifi

Aleksandar Joksimović, An Ideal Socialist Fashion Designer

Danijela Velimirovic

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The rise of a middle class during the 1960s and consumer rejection of unfashionable clothes contributed to a revival of Yugoslav fashion design. The first recognized designer of official fashion production was Aleksandar Joksimovic. Born in 1933, he abandoned his studies at the Belgrade Academy of Applied Arts, finding a job designing work uniforms for the City of Belgrade Institute for Household Improvement. In 1963, after his designs had won several awards, the institute asked him to create a c

The Portrayal of Balkan Dress in Western Travel Books

Antonia Young

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Only a few Western travelers have focused specifically on the dress they encountered, and travel books generally devote a very small proportion of their texts and illustrations to clothes or national dress, often observing simply that they were “picturesque” or “colorful.” Most include at least one photograph of a woman in national dress, but without precise information. Many travel writers focused more on architecture, although this can include early dress depicted in frescoes, paintings, and th

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