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Palestinian Women’s Dress

Widad Kawar and Sibba Einarsdóttir

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Palestine had a wide variety of traditional dress styles. Not only did every area have a different style, but often every village had its own distinctive dress, and sometimes the various large families living in one village would have a range of different styles. Occasionally, there were differences within the same family as women from different villages entered the family as wives and each brought her own embroidery traditions and clothing styles with her. All of this variety makes defining Pale

Dress in Modern Israel

Ayala Raz

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Dress in Palestine at the end of the nineteenth century and up until the establishment of the independent State of Israel in 1948 reflected the many changes that took place in the area during that time. The most prominent change was the end of the Ottoman Empire, which had ruled for over one hundred years, and the takeover by the British Mandate (1922) following the occupation of Palestine by the British Army in World War I (1917).

Palestinian Scarves and Flag Dresses

Tineke Rooijakkers

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Palestinian scarf and the flag dress are powerful nationalistic and political icons. Their history is strongly connected to the disruptive occurrences of the twentieth century, such as the British Mandate period from 1922 to 1948, the foundation of the State of Israel in 1948, and the ensuing Arab-Israeli conflicts.

Palestinian Embroidery

Tineke Rooijakkers and Gillian Vogelsang-Eastwood

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Embroidery in the Palestinian region is perhaps best known for its cross-stitch patterns in various geometric or floral motifs. However, there is considerably more to Palestinian embroidery. It has its roots in personal and group identification (urban/nomad, rich/poor, northern/southern, married/unmarried, and so on) as well as being a simple, but very effective, manner of reflecting women’s creative and artistic abilities. It has also been, on a more prosaic level, an important means by which wo

Embroidery Workshops in Palestine

Heike Weber

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The first commercial embroidery workshops were founded in Palestine at the beginning of the twentieth century, caused by economic changes in Palestine. Groups of women, instead of working for themselves or their families, organized embroidery workshops. The centers of this movement were Bethlehem, Ramallah, and Beit Dajan, where workshops attracted women from surrounding villages. The basic embroidery was carried out at home, and assembly of the garments and more complicated embroideries took pla

Book chapter

I was nurtured in a footwear environment. Shoes were in my genes. Dad was in the shoe fabric business in Boston. The shoe business in itself formed a Jewish community. Instead of leather, fabric substituted for lining in women’s shoes. Then it became fashionable for fabric to be used as the outer shell. Later, Dad introduced Lucite. It was a hot item. When he came home from work, he was usually carrying boxes of sample shoes to show the family and for me to try on. Fortunately they were my size.

Socialist Zionism was a revolutionary ideology that merged national and cosmopolitan left-wing ideals. It wished to create not merely a new Jewish nation in the Jewish ancestral homeland, but a model society organized along principles of equality and social justice. Seeking to revolutionize Jewish life, it embraced the stereotypical ideal of the “New Jew” as the antithesis of the exilic “Old Jew,” who was disparaged for excessive intellectualism and physical weakness. The new Zionist Jew was defi

Contexts of Resistance

Fadwa El Guindi

Source: Veil. Modesty, Privacy and Resistance 1999

Book chapter

A “historic dynamism of the veil” (Fanon’s phrase) was dramatically played out in Algeria’s struggle for independence. Fanon wrote: “The veil helped the Algerian woman to meet the new problems created by the struggle” (1967: 63). The role of the veil in liberating Algeria from French colonial occupation is popularly known, idealized, romanticized, ideologized, and fictionalized, but nonetheless real. When the French landed in Algeria in 1830 most inhabitants were Arabic-speaking Sunni Muslims (fo

Traditional Palestinian Wedding Dress as a Symbol of Nationalism

Yvonne J. Seng and Betty Wass

Source: Dress and Ethnicity. Change Across Space and Time 1995

Book chapter

The topic of tradition itself is currently undergoing reevaluation. In ethnographic research it has come to mean an item or action inherited intact from the past, “relatively invariant from generation to generation” (Dominguez 1986: 549). Collectors and exhibitors of traditional dress and other cultural artefacts have in general presented and reinforced this definition, which establishes a dichotomy between “traditional” and “modern” societies.See Baizerman (1990), pp. 233–40; Clifford (1988) pp.

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