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Hawaiian Dress Prior to 1898

Linda Boynton Arthur

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Hawai’i is an archipelago in the Pacific Ocean, a chain referred to simply as Hawai’i or the Hawaiian Islands. The six major islands are Oahu, Kauai, Maui, Molokai, Lanai, and the Big Island, that is, Hawai’i. The latter name is rarely used, in order to reduce confusion, since Hawai’i (the archipelago) became an American state in 1959. Until the late eighteenth century the peoples who inhabited these islands shared a common culture, although they were somewhat divided politically in that each had

Dress in Hawai’i since 1898

Linda Boynton Arthur

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Hawai’i became a territory of the United States in 1898. The population of native Hawaiians had been significantly reduced due to the introduction of foreign diseases in the 1800s. Hawaiian dress has consistently included body adornment worn by both men and women. Forms of adornment in Hawai’i include hats made of lauhala, floral leis worn around the neck and/or head, shell leis, and tattoos using traditional designs. In the 1930s, Western shirts began to be replaced by the aloha shirt. Hawaiian

The Jewelry Industry

Carol Anne Dickson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

From early times, men and women have sought to adorn themselves. The desire to adorn the body answered several needs: communication of identity, including status and kinship, as well as symbols of protection and spiritual beliefs. The desire to express beliefs, status, and affiliations grew as the number of family members grew and the number of families who formed groups expanded. It is certain that jewelry antedates clothing. Whether it was worn for artistic display or utility, we do not know fo

Introduction to the Dress of the Pacific Islands

Adrienne L. Kaeppler

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Pacific Ocean covers one-third of the earth’s surface and is inhabited by hundreds of cultural groups. Some twenty-five thousand islands, ranging from tiny specks of coral to the large island of New Guinea, are occupied by physically diverse peoples, many of whom have mixed and intermixed. Environments range from snowy mountains to raging volcanoes, from steaming rain forests to parched deserts, from coral atolls to volcanic outcrops. These Pacific Islands are usually divided into three histo

The Social World of Cloth in the Pacific Islands

Susanne Küchler and Graeme Were

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Portable, malleable, absorbent, and textured, often with colored patterns that attract or repel the mind, cloth the world over is essential for all manner of fastenings and constructions that give form to the social relations that are conceived as dependent upon the actions of the body. Pacific societies are unique in expressing, perhaps more fervently than observed elsewhere, the centrality of cloth to identities of kinship and political authority, as cloth is harnessed and transformed into surf

Boardshorts: A Perfect Fit

Sara Oka

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Hawaii’s unofficial uniform is the boardshort—a perfect fit for the birthplace of surfing. Boardshorts in the islands were initially created as custom-made surf trunks during the 1950s and 1960s by tailors at popular venues on Oahu such as the H. Miura Store in Hale’iwa, on the North Shore, Take’s or Linn’s in Waikiki, or M. Nii’s in Makaha. These early trunks were first designed for fit and comfort, maximized for the ultimate wave-riding experience. The evolution of this single, simple garment i

The Polynesian Cultural Center and the Mormon Image of the Body: Images of Paradise on Laie, Hawai’i

Frank Salamone

Source: Religion, Dress and the Body. Dress, Body, Culture 1999

Book chapter

The social body constrains the way the physical body is perceived. The physical experience of the body, always modified by the social categories through which it is known, sustains a particular view of society.

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