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Dress of the Chamorro

Judith S. Flores

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Chamorro are the indigenous people of the Mariana Islands in the Western Pacific area of Micronesia. At the time of first European contact in 1521, and in subsequent visitor descriptions throughout the sixteenth century, Chamorros were described as being unclothed, or in the case of some women covered only in their pubic areas. Missionaries arrived in 1668, and the islands were subjugated by Spain from that time until American takeover in 1899. The Chamorro population was so reduced from dise

Introduction to the Dress of the Pacific Islands

Adrienne L. Kaeppler

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Pacific Ocean covers one-third of the earth’s surface and is inhabited by hundreds of cultural groups. Some twenty-five thousand islands, ranging from tiny specks of coral to the large island of New Guinea, are occupied by physically diverse peoples, many of whom have mixed and intermixed. Environments range from snowy mountains to raging volcanoes, from steaming rain forests to parched deserts, from coral atolls to volcanic outcrops. These Pacific Islands are usually divided into three histo

Lavalava (Cloth) of the Rei Metau

Carmen C. H. Petrosian-Husa

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Rei Metau (People of the Open Sea) live on the Outer Islands of Yap in the Federated States of Micronesia, and they are therefore known as Outer Islanders. About four thousand people inhabit nine small atolls, which together make up no more than about seven square miles (about eighteen square kilometers). They understand themselves as one ethnic group, speak the same language, and live under the authority of their island’s chiefs and of one paramount chief. Lavalava are their national dress a

Photographic Representations of Pacific Peoples

Max Quanchi

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The first camera arrived in the Pacific shortly after it was invented in France in 1839, and photographs of Pacific Islanders were taken during several European voyages in the 1840s. Most of these photographs have not survived. Permanent European traders, settlers, and regular visitors increased after the founding of Botany Bay (Sydney) in 1788 and the growth of port towns at Honolulu, Papeete, Levuka, and Apia; and an accessible collection of photographs, many recording the dress and accoutremen

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