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Bibliographic guide

In response to the question of what is the social psychology of dress, one first needs to address two related questions: what is dress and what is social psychology? The term dress has been defined by dress scholars Mary Ellen Roach and Joanne Eicher (1992) as the total arrangement of outwardly detectable body modifications and all material objects added to it in the form of body supplements. Body modifications are transformations made directly to the body and include making changes of color (e.g, Berg Fashion Library

Bibliographic guide

In academic literature, the words “sex” and “gender” have specific meanings that are interchangeable in popular usage. To the scholar, “sex” is used to denote biological categories (male, female); “gender” is used for distinctions in role, appearance, and behavior that are cultural in origin, but stemming from an individual’s sex (masculinity and femininity). In practice, these classifications are more complex; recent scholarship has begun to take into consideration the fact that biological sex i, Berg Fashion Library

Bibliographic guide

A number of scholars have helped to develop the field of aesthetics of dress using a multidisciplinary approach. An early literature review was completed by dress scholars DeLong et al. (1974). Marilyn Horn (1975), also a dress scholar, approached the study of clothing as an interdisciplinary topic. Later, DeLong and Ann Marie Fiore (1994), seeking to provide a better understanding of aesthetics of dress, edited a compilation of papers that included a variety of perspectives. Fiore, Patricia Kiml, Berg Fashion Library

Bibliographic guide

Dress, along with cloth, textiles, and adornment, has been an important part of the study of material culture in anthropology since the early times of the discipline, when the focus was on cross-cultural variation and the relationships between different parts of culture and their changes. Some earlier studies aimed specifically to record the significance of material culture in the face of change in a manner that sometimes has been described as “salvage anthropology.” A later generation of anthrop, Berg Fashion Library

Bibliographic guide

Sources employed for the study of dress history include documents, visual representations, and material artifacts. Documents include all manner of written records such as wills, inventories, wardrobe accounts, bills of sale, advice on dressing, as well as eyewitness accounts of how people dressed in the past. An early example would be the Roman historian Tacitus, who described the dress of the inhabitants of central Europe in Germania in 98 C.E. The visual record includes paintings, drawings, eng, Berg Fashion Library

Bibliographic guide

]Introductory texts on world religions are numerous and generally offer a selection of definitions—from the classic to more contemporary approaches that attempt to embrace all religions under a problematical single all-encompassing definition. In the study of religion, theoretical frameworks vary from the sociological, psychological, and anthropological to the neurophysiological; there are also those from studies in religion. Scholars of religion Willard G. Oxtoby and Alan F. Segal, in A Concise , Berg Fashion Library

Bibliographic guide

The word “media” is the plural form of “medium,” from the Latin, meaning “middle” or “middle layer.” Thus, a medium is much like a middleman, a conduit that serves to “lead” or “bring together.” In fashion, each medium functions to hold and deliver information: visual, textual, cultural., Berg Fashion Library

Bibliographic guide

Research in sustainable fashion examines relevant issues from perspectives including theoretical, cultural, social, design-led, industry-based, educational, economic, and psychological. For reasons that might be purely serendipitous, but indicating much underlying research activity, 2008 was a significant year for scholarly publications on sustainable fashion. Comprehensive texts by two UK design-based academics, theorist Kate Fletcher (2008) and practitioner Sandy Black (2008), articulate and ad, Berg Fashion Library

Bibliographic guide

Sportsmen and women wear particular clothing for reasons which include freedom of movement, physical protection of the body, weatherproofing, identification, enhanced performance, team bonding, and also fashion. The article explores some of the literature on various aspects of sportswear, such as its history, specialization for individual sports, fashion, and the impact of textile technology. It investigates and guides readers toward a selection of texts that give detailed information on sports c, Berg Fashion Library

Bibliographic guide

Fashion as a research topic has been marginal and never been popular or mainstream in the field of social sciences. It was a topic often taken up by philosophers and moral/social critics in the first half of the nineteenth century, such as René König. Fashion scholars such as Yuniya Kawamura, Gilles Lipovetsky, Sandra Niessen, Anne Brydon, and Elizabeth Wilson have pointed out the academic devaluation of the topic. But with a growing number of academic journals and publications on fashion and dre, Berg Fashion Library

Bibliographic guide

Trend forecasting looks into the shifts in cultural, economic, and technological contexts to predict how people will behave in the future in terms of their consumption patterns. Trend forecasting is especially vital for creative domains like fashion. Fashion is also one of the most visible media for trends as it reflects the change in the collective aesthetic through multiple mediums. The successful prediction of future fashion trends requires research across multiple industries and contexts. Int, Berg Fashion Library

Bibliographic guide

Western subcultural style uses the dressed body as a place of social critique and artistic expression that does not follow the conventions of mainstream style. Subcultural dress can also demonstrate lifestyle and community participation, as well as individual experiences that pertain to the subcultural interests. Scholarship on the dress practices of punk, goth, hip-hop, hippie, and other underground lifestyles has shown that subcultural dress can be a catalyst for change in the mainstream fashio, Berg Fashion Library

Bibliographic guide

Fashion weeks have become a global phenomenon during the twenty-first century, as hundreds of cities around the world organize events in the hope of attracting attention from clients, retailers, and the press. The established capitals of fashion—Paris, New York, London, and Milan—increasingly share the spotlight with Lagos, New Delhi, and São Paolo, among many other cities. Fashion weeks traditionally center on the live showings of designers’ new, seasonal collections. Whereas such shows were onc, Berg Fashion Library

Bibliographic guide

Fashion has frequently been seen as frivolous compared to art. Art was the “male,” serious, and spiritual branch of creative activity, while fashion was “female,” transient, and vain. Art sought to transcend time, while fashion was tie-bound to it. However, art’s increasingly close relationship with media and commodities in the second half of the twentieth century made such distinctions less fathomable and less sustainable. The early twenty-first century has witnessed an even more rapid breakdown, Berg Fashion Library

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