Results: Text (14) Images (0)

Filtered by:

Clear filters
Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 14 of 14 (1 pages)
    Page 1 of 1
Knit Fabrics

Deborah E. Young

Source: Swatch Reference Guide for Fashion Fabrics, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Knitting is the second major method of constructing a textile. Weaving was invented thousands of years before knitting; knits are relative newcomers. As such, knitting structures borrow a lot of their terms and surfaces from woven fabrics. Notice that some knit fabrics even share the same or similar names as woven fabrics, such as piqués, ribs, and jacquards. It can be quite confusing. In the past decade, the knit market has grown exponentially, taking on a much larger share of the textile market

Warp Knits

Deborah E. Young

Source: Swatch Reference Guide for Fashion Fabrics, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Tricot is the simplest of the warp knits. Notice that Swatch 144 has a different face and back, like jersey. In fact, tricot and jersey are made quite similarly. Each is made entirely of knit stitches, with a face of wales and a back of courses. But jersey and tricot are made on different machines and, therefore, do not look or perform the same. Generally, tricot is lighter weight and smoother than jersey because the stitches are smaller, and tricot is usually made of filament yarns. Unlike jerse

Quick Reference Guide Tables

Deborah E. Young

Source: Swatch Reference Guide for Fashion Fabrics, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Getting to Know Knits and Stretch Fabrics

Sharon Czachor

Source: Sewing with Knits and Stretch Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Garments constructed from knitted fabric conform more easily to the shape of the body, reducing the fitting and construction details while retaining the shape. This allows the stretch of the fabric to replace the ease that is needed in designing woven fabric garments. The fitting for garments in stretch fabric is very different from woven fabrics and is addressed at the patternmaking stage. For further information, refer to Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics by Julie Cole (Fairchild Books, 2

Project Five—Photoshop: Stripes and Weaves

Robert Hume

Source: Fashion and Textile Design with Photoshop and Illustrator. Professional Creative Practice, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

In this project you will:

Woven Fabrics (Swatches 28–48)

Ingrid Johnson, Ajoy K. Sarkar and Allen C. Cohen

Source: J. J.Pizzuto’s Fabric Science. Swatch Kit, 11th Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Knitted Fabrics (Swatches 49–69)

Ingrid Johnson, Ajoy K. Sarkar and Allen C. Cohen

Source: J. J.Pizzuto’s Fabric Science. Swatch Kit, 11th Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Woven Fabrics

Ingrid Johnson, Allen C. Cohen and Ajoy K. Sarkar

Source: J.J. Pizzuto’s Fabric Science, 11th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Over 4,000 years ago, man created fabric through the use of a crude wood-framed loom. Typically this weaving device held yarns in an upright position as they were interlaced with one another by hand. Primeval man used this to make fabric to clothe and protect. As civilization began to develop, some woven fabric was used to indicate standing within the community. Eventually, royalty and religious figures used ornately woven fabric to indicate their stature. Looms were also used to depict stories i

Colour and Fabrics

John Hopkins

Source: Fashion Design: The Complete Guide, 2012, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Colour is a fundamental element in fashion design that can evoke an emotional response but is also determined by scientific principles. The associations between colour and light should be clearly understood from the outset: in the absence of light it is not possible to view colour. So it follows that variations in light, whether natural or man-made, directly affect the way in which colour is seen with the human eye. Moreover, the human eye has the capacity to distinguish between a vast range of c

West Africa

Lisa Aronson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

West African markets are well known for their tightly packed displays of textiles in rich arrays of colors and patterns, and tailors on their sewing machines can be heard everywhere sewing visually striking garments that seldom go unnoticed when worn in public. So vital and richly varied are textiles in West Africa that even prominent contemporary artists such as El Anatsui from Ghana and Nigeria and Yinka Shonibare from Nigeria are inspired by them as powerful mediums for discourse on historical

Knit Fabrics And Their Properties

Virginia Hencken Elsasser

Source: Textiles. Concepts and Principles, 3rd Edition, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

In simplest terms, knitting is the act of interlooping yarn to create fabric, as opposed to weaving, which is the act of interlacing yarns to create fabric. This looping structure contributes to the comfort and easy fit of knit fabrics and is responsible for increasing the popularity of knit apparel. (See CP-5)

Indonesia

Itie van Hout

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Diverse cultural elements have shaped the Indonesian archipelago, changing dress traditions. Before weaving was known, leaves, plant fibers, and barkcloth were used for clothing. Cotton, not native to Indonesia, may have arrived from India. Early clothing probably consisted of loincloths and hip wrappers. Later dress, particularly ceremonial, comprised layers of clothing. Textiles, imbued with magical qualities, were crucial to relationships between the supernatural and human worlds. By the seven

Ancient Attire of the Southern Andes

Amy Oakland

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean, 2005, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Although rare in most parts of the world, ancient textiles are preserved in many regions of the southern Andes. The best conditions for preservation exist along the Pacific Coast of Peru and northern Chile, but cloth and clothing items from early periods have also been discovered in protected cave sites in several highland zones. Different lifestyles, plant cultigens, and cultural traditions developed separately in highland and coastal regions, but it is apparent that from very early times, peopl

The Huipil of Guatemala

J. Claire Odland

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean, 2005, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

In the highlands of Guatemala, indigenous Maya women are well known for their beautiful traditional dress, called traje. Women’s traje consists of a huipil (blouse or tunic), corte (skirt), faja (sash), and may include a distinctive headdress, shawl, apron, and overblouse as well. The huipil, usually brocaded by hand on a backstrap loom, is a traditional garment that continues to be popular and has great social significance. Changes in huipil fashion reflect political, economic, and social change

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 14 of 14 (1 pages)
Page 1 of 1