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The Design Process

Martin M. Pegler and Anne Kong

Source: Visual Merchandising and Display, 7th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

one-off design brief, alternative approach todocumentation included in design briefdesign briefdocumentation included inbalancedefinedbriefdesign concepts ofdirective forThe design design concepts ofprocess forprocess typically begins with a document known as a design processdesign directivedesign directive, which is also called a brief or deckdeck. The directive provides a comprehensive review of the proposed initiative. It can originate internally within the company or externally with a contrac

The Design Sketch: A History of Style

Linda Tain

Source: Portfolio Presentation for Fashion Designers. Fourth Edition, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

As women began to be assimilated into the male-dominated workplace, the need arose for a more tailored and functional working wardrobe. Enter the streamlined hourglass silhouette with leg-o’-mutton sleeve, giving new emphasis to the shoulder line. Multiple petticoats replaced the crinoline and bustle, whereas the corseted bodice remained. The Gibson, Charles DanaGibson Girl look for evening, complete with poufed hair knotted on top, was even more detail oriented than its daytime counterpart, aide

The Design Journal: Exploration and Process

Linda Tain

Source: Portfolio Presentation for Fashion Designers. Fourth Edition, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Design journalstyle and sizeStyle and Size

Flats and Specs

Linda Tain

Source: Portfolio Presentation for Fashion Designers. Fourth Edition, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Creating good-looking, well-proportioned flats by hand takes practice. Designers who constantly draw flats claim that, with time, they acquire consistency in technique and speed in execution. The following exercises, techniques, and supply list are designed to assist the beginner, intermediate, and advanced student in drawing flats by hand. Later in the chapter, creating flats using Illustrator will be discussed and compared.

Presentations and Beyond

Linda Tain

Source: Portfolio Presentation for Fashion Designers. Fourth Edition, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Presentation collection/product development designplanningNo matter how complex or simple the project, careful planning is the key to creating professional presentation boards. Many designers make a “working” list that they adjust to suit each project. The following list is generally sufficient and applicable to most projects, in that each stage of development enables you to gain momentum and move ahead with minimum backtracking. Each of the following stages will be discussed in sequence:

Fashion Accessories Presentations

Linda Tain

Source: Portfolio Presentation for Fashion Designers. Fourth Edition, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

category specificsThe major areas of Categoriesfashion accessoriesfashion accessories are the following:

Creative Design and the Development Package

Lisa Donofrio-Ferrezza and Marilyn Hefferen

Source: Designing a Knitwear Collection. From Inspiration to Finished Garments, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Inspiration for a seasonal knitwear collection comes from many sources—popular culture; the available yarns and equipment; and prevailing trends in silhouettes, stitches, patterns, and color palettes. Designers may travel to yarn and knit fairs to review the forecasted trends for seasonal yarns and stitch development and begin to purchase sample yarn for their next season. One of the largest knit fairs, Pitti Filati, takes place in Florence, Italy, twice yearly for about three days around the end

Sample Development

Lisa Donofrio-Ferrezza and Marilyn Hefferen

Source: Designing a Knitwear Collection. From Inspiration to Finished Garments, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The experience of knitting a sample on a hand-flat knitting machine is an invaluable process for designers to come to understand the principles of sweater construction. The method of hand-knitting on a machine includes increasing and decreasing to shape a garment and partial knitting to shape the shoulder and neckline. Through this experience, designers gain insight and an understanding of how a sweater's structure, styling, and finishing can affect the design. After knitting and constructing a b

Design Development for Menswear

John Hopkins

Source: Menswear, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A man should look as if he’s bought his clothes with intelligence, put them on with care and forgotten all about them.

Menswear Presentations

John Hopkins

Source: Menswear, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

There are three responses toa piece of design—yes, no,and wow! Wow is the one toaim for.

Garment Styling

Sandra Keiser, Deborah Vandermar and Myrna B. Garner

Source: Beyond Design. The Synergy of Apparel Product Development, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

“I wish I had invented blue jeans. They have expression, modesty, sex appeal, simplicity—all I hope for in my clothes.”

Proportion and the Fashion Figure

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Sometimes the body takes over. Sometimes the garment takes over. Sometimes it is more equal. When the body takes over, as in a slinky gown, the garment does not come to life until it is on the body. When the garment takes over, as in a voluminous coat, the body is merely a hanger for the clothing. But many times, it is a combination of both.

Drawing the Fashion Figure

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

In the beginning, there are certain rules of proportion with which you must become familiar. The figure is measured in “heads,” with each head representing one inch. These heads will be used to indicate and place the different parts of the fashion figure. After some practice, all the “heads” will suddenly become a figure and after a while you will be drawing!

The Balance Line

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Simple Blocking of the Figure

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Now that we are familiar with the proportions of the croquis figure, we will want to give the figure some movement.

Center Front

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Center front is most evident on a dress with a “V” neck. The point of the “V” is exactly in the middle. As the figure starts to turn, the center— or “V” front—moves with it. The side that turns away from you becomes smaller. This side always shows the outline of the breast. The side that is near you becomes larger. It always has a straighter line, which is the side plane of the figure. It never shows the outline of the breast.

Arms, Legs, Hands, and Feet

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The arm does not hang straight. In a natural position, it has a slight curve to it. When establishing the arm, think of it as starting from the shoulder and having four divisions:

The Fashion Face

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The 1920s was the age of the flapper. Women were much more emancipated than they were at the turn of the century. Makeup had a painted-doll look to it with Clara Bow and Gloria Swanson setting the style. There was an equal balance between the eyes and the lips, which were often cupid-bow-shaped and red. The eyes were shadowed and the brows rather thin. The cheeks were rouged, and at times a beauty mark was placed near the chin. The hair was sleek and bobbed, giving the head a very small look.

The Turned and Profile Figures

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

1 Begin by blocking off a front-view figure, with the shoulders and hips going in opposite directions.

Gesture and the “S” Curve

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

This is one of the most classic and fashionable gestures or poses. It is also a very important movement— the crunch and stretch.

Shaping the Body

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

1 Notice the planes of the female body—out over the breasts, in underneath them, going in at the waist, and rounding out over the hips. You can observe how shadows form under the areas that curve in and disappear on the areas that extend out.

How to See and Plan the Figure

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Fashion Silhouettes

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

This silhouette hangs straight from the shoulder. At the end of the 1950s, Balenciaga and Givenchy were greatly responsible for introducing this silhouette.

Necklines

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

When drawing any neckline, you must be aware that the shape is going around the neck completely and that it relates to the shoulders and chest area as well. As you can see from the turned and profile views of the neck, it is also higher in the back than the front.

Collars

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Any collar can be cut on the straight, cross, or bias grain or can be mitered on the bias at the center back. However, these different grain lines are most evident on striped collars. The bias-cut collar has the most stretch to it and is often chosen by designers because of its beautiful roll line.

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