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Application of Trend Data

Aki Choklat

Source: Menswear Trends, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

TrendinformationTextile View (magazine) Trends and trend research are useful in several different areas of the men's fashion business. Within larger menswear corporations there are often specific menswear brands that utilize trend information in various different ways, from packaging to selection of materials. Similarly, retailers use numerous sectors, such as general trend direction, colour and material information, to influence their decision process from visual merchandising to buying.

The Design Process

Martin M. Pegler and Anne Kong

Source: Visual Merchandising and Display, 7th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

one-off design brief, alternative approach todocumentation included in design briefdesign briefdocumentation included inbalancedefinedbriefdesign concepts ofdirective forThe design design concepts ofprocess forprocess typically begins with a document known as a design processdesign directivedesign directive, which is also called a brief or deckdeck. The directive provides a comprehensive review of the proposed initiative. It can originate internally within the company or externally with a contrac

Creating and presenting a forecast

Chelsea Rousso and Nancy Kaplan Ostroff

Source: Fashion Forward. A Guide to Fashion Forecasting, 2nd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

fashion forecastsfinalThe two portions of a final fashion forecast include a visual portion and a written portion. To stylecreate a professional-quality forecast, a visually stimulating product and a compelling script must be developed. The fashion forecastsvisual portionvisual portion is made up of presentationpresentation boards, computer-generated slides, or imagery created for the Web. The fashion forecastswritten portionwritten portion can be verbally presented to an audience through a scrip

Organization and Contents

Linda Tain

Source: Portfolio Presentation for Fashion Designers. Fourth Edition, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Portfolio casesentry-levelEntry-level portfolioThe entry-level portfolio for applying to a fashion design program usually consists of a prescribed format (designed by the college) to demonstrate design, rendering, and presentation skills. Whether you prepared the portfolio on your own or during a pre-college program, your interviewer will be looking for drawing ability, creativity and imagination, individuality/style/ personal vision, and an awareness of fashion. These are the criteria you will b

Presentation Concepts

Linda Tain

Source: Portfolio Presentation for Fashion Designers. Fourth Edition, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Because Chapter 4 discusses organization and content, this chapter will primarily deal with the characteristic elements of a Fabric/color portfolio contentspresentation conceptspresentation, namely Mood/theme, presentation conceptsPresentation conceptsmood/thememood/theme, fabric/color story, design groups on figures, and flat presentations.

Creative Design and the Development Package

Lisa Donofrio-Ferrezza and Marilyn Hefferen

Source: Designing a Knitwear Collection. From Inspiration to Finished Garments, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Inspiration for a seasonal knitwear collection comes from many sources—popular culture; the available yarns and equipment; and prevailing trends in silhouettes, stitches, patterns, and color palettes. Designers may travel to yarn and knit fairs to review the forecasted trends for seasonal yarns and stitch development and begin to purchase sample yarn for their next season. One of the largest knit fairs, Pitti Filati, takes place in Florence, Italy, twice yearly for about three days around the end

Menswear Presentations

John Hopkins

Source: Menswear, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

There are three responses toa piece of design—yes, no,and wow! Wow is the one toaim for.

Research

Richard Sorger and Jenny Udale

Source: The Fundamentals of Fashion Design, 3rd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

There is no point in trying to be fashionable. This book cannot tell you how to design fashion; it can only tell you what the ingredients are, ways to put them together, and many of the important things that you will need to consider when designing clothes. Clothing is only “fashionable” when your peers or the industry deem a design to be of the zeitgeist. It either is or it isn’t.

Project Sixteen—Illustrator: Layout

Robert Hume

Source: Fashion and Textile Design with Photoshop and Illustrator. Professional Creative Practice, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Without some underlying structure in a presentation, elements can jump about randomly distracting the viewer and thereby working against your desire to appear professional

Stage 6: Communication

Karl Aspelund

Source: The Design Process, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Designing is, among other things, the art of communicating an idea toward a solution to a specific problem. Communication is therefore a key issue throughout the whole design process. Presentations and discussions, large and small, take place from the very beginning of your inspirational stage onward. Presenting communication as a separate stage of the process should in no way be taken to mean that it is only important at this stage. It is simply presented as the sixth stage because at this point

Presenting the Forecast

Evelyn L. Brannon and Lorynn Divita

Source: Fashion Forecasting, 4th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Data is very important, but you have to be good at reading the data in an emotional way.

Research and Design

Sarah Bailey and Jonathan Baker

Source: Visual Merchandising for Fashion, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

There are numerous ways to enhance creative thinking: reading publications, experiencing different cultures, surrounding oneself with other creative people, visiting shows, exhibitions and galleries and so on. As visual researchers we already do these things, but we can be more strategic with the creative processes. The following section outlines techniques that can be used as starting points to activate the creative thinking process.

Focused Portfolios

Joanne Ciresi Barrett

Source: Designing Your Fashion Portfolio. From Concept to Presentation, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

What makes a portfolio specific to a market? The end consumer, competitive retail market, and trend research completed in Chapters 2 and 3 are the foundation of a market focus. You were challenged to discover an age group and a lifestyle of your consumer. These findings contribute to the decision-making process of line development.

Successful Line Building from A to Z The Portfolio Project

Joanne Ciresi Barrett

Source: Designing Your Fashion Portfolio. From Concept to Presentation, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The Portfolio Project is the process of basic design line building of your portfolio collection. There are three steps of line building: concept building, editing, and finalization. The Portfolio Project walks you through each of these three steps in each of the four segments of the portfolio—mood, color, textiles, and silhouettes—with demonstration photographs and think-and-do work. The materials are exercises you have completed and developed in the preceding chapters. Systematically, you will l

Virtual Appropriation

Melitta Baumeister

Source: Fashion Thinking. Creative Approaches to the Design Process, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

This project was undertaken as part of Melitta’s BFA senior thesis collection at Pforzheim University in Germany in 2010. The collection comprised eight looks and took five months to create. It was shown to an industry panel and Melitta also created a follow-up exhibition in a public space. As a result, she was nominated for the Apolda European Design Award 2011, an award scheme aiming to support and promote promising young European designers.

Fashion Design, Presentation, and Exhibition with Photoshop®

Stacy Stewart Smith

Source: CAD for Fashion Design and Merchandising, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Chapter 7 contains a series of fashion design and merchandising tutorials that demonstrate the painting benefits of Photoshop®. You will also have an opportunity to exercise your own freehand electronic drawing skill while you master the tools, panels, and filters of the program.

Essential Research

Elizabeth Galton

Source: Basics Fashion Design 10: Jewellery Design. From Fashion to Fine Jewellery, 2012, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A well-balanced, commercial jewellery collection requires a huge degree of research, attention to detail, consideration of materials and price, and a clear understanding of the customer and the market. Designers absorb ideas and references from a variety of cultural sources, such as history, film, music, literature, and art. In this chapter we explore the sources of inspiration and the importance of research.

Inspiration and Research for Handbags

Aneta Genova

Source: Accessory Design, 2012, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Chapter Six explains how handbag designers conduct research and find inspiration. After reading this chapter, you will be able to identify research stages and goals, locate sources of inspiration, and choose design concepts, materials, and hardware. You will also learn how to build a mood board to present your completed research.

Presentation formats

John Hopkins

Source: Basics Fashion Design 05: Fashion Drawing, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

‘To create something exceptional, your mindset must be relentlessly focused on the smallest detail.’

Creative development

Juliana Sissons

Source: Basics Fashion Design 06: Knitwear, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

At college or university you will respond to briefs that are written and set by tutors. In your final year, however, you will be working towards your final degree collection and you will be expected to set your own project brief. Occasionally, competition briefs are set by companies within the industry, which offer a valuable insight into the commercial world. The aims of these projects are specific to the company brand and consumer market, making the costs and price range of design an important,

Creating a Collection in a Big Company

Kasper Tang Vangkilde

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The creation of a fashion collection in a big fashion company is a complex cooperative process. Various people with diverse skills and experiences, such as designers, brand specialists, clothing technicians, production planners, and others, are involved in the creative process from the idea to the finished collection. HUGO BOSS, a leading European high-end fashion company, is a case in point. Because of the company’s strong product focus, each product group (for example, shirts or knitwear) is ha

Working with Adobe Photoshop to Create Mood and Trend Presentation Boards

Jemi Armstrong, Lorrie Ivas and Wynn Armstrong

Source: From Pencil to Pen Tool. Understanding and Creating the Digital Fashion Image, 2006, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

This chapter utilizes the design elements integral to creating a fashion line or group with the documentation of what actually inspired the creative direction. The selling of the idea is as important as selling the designs themselves. Predictive services sell information and ideas to design firms. These firms then develop their own lines but must convey their ideas using visuals, including mood boards, trend boards, a

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