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Design Development for Menswear

John Hopkins

Source: Menswear, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A man should look as if he’s bought his clothes with intelligence, put them on with care and forgotten all about them.

Stage 5: Definition/Modeling

Karl Aspelund

Source: The Design Process, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

This chapter explores the steps you need to take to move your project from the exploration stage to a more definite embodiment in the physical world. The concept must become an object. We must transition from exploring to deciding what it is exactly and sometimes even deciding what it is precisely not, the emphasis being very much on exactly and precisely. Some people would say that this decision-making process is the designer’s primary function. Indeed, the designer must make choices that keep t

Stage 7: Production

Karl Aspelund

Source: The Design Process, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Congratulations! You have created your designs from a solid concept and presented them to all concerned with great results. Now is when some would say the work begins in earnest. It may certainly feel as if you are done, and you are partially justified in feeling so, since you have completed the crucial stage of getting the idea into the world. Your responsibilities are fulfilled. The production team takes over from here and sees your designs through to the end. But don’t think you can pack every

Presenting Designs

Karl Aspelund

Source: Designing. An Introduction, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Designers Speak

The Fit

Roberto Cabrera and Denis Antoine

Source: Classic Tailoring Techniques for Menswear. A Construction Guide, 2nd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The next step is to cut the basic pattern pieces from a good quality prototyping fabric and to check the fit. Tailors do not always use muslin (also known as calico) for this process. Instead, we recommend using a cheaper wool cloth, which will behave more similarly to your chosen final fabric. The chest and shoulder area of your toile should be reinforced with interfacing, either fusible or quickly hand-basted in place.

Apparel Sizing and Fit Strategies

Janace E. Bubonia

Source: Apparel Quality. A Guide To Evaluating Sewn Products, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Size designations for apparel products delineate a body size, which is indicated by a letter code or number on a garment label to assist consumers with purchases. Letter code sizing typically encompasses two to three numeric sizes and is reported as one or more letters. A common range for letter code sizing is XXS (extra, extra small), XS (extra small), S (small), M (medium), L (large), XL (extra large), XXL (extra, extra large), or XXXL (triple extra large). The number of sizes offered in the ra

The Apparel Product Development Process and Technical Design

Jaeil Lee and Camille Steen

Source: Technical Sourcebook for Designers, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

Toile/muslin/prototype development

Jennifer Prendergast

Source: Sewing Techniques. An introduction to construction skills within the design process, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Realizing your designs through the toile development process is very satisfying. There will be mistakes along the way but this is normal and should be expected; nobody ever produces perfect results first time. There will be amendments throughout the process, for example to the details, such as pockets and trims, as well as to the toile fitting itself.

Tech Packs and Manufacturing for Footwear

Aneta Genova

Source: Accessory Design, 2012, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Chapter Thirteen describes the technical responsibilities of a footwear designer. After reading this chapter, you will be able to trace the manufacturing process for footwear and understand how to use spec sheets and tech packs to communicate with manufacturing teams.

Product Development

Virginia Grose

Source: Fashion Merchandising, 2012, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Different retailers will either elect to buy branded products or develop own-label products; the larger retailers tend to have a mixture of the two. It is important to distinguish between these strategies for the purposes of range planning, which we discuss in more detail later in the chapter.

Concept to Prototype

John Hopkins

Source: Fashion Design: The Complete Guide, 2012, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The fashion studio is a dedicated working environment in which the fashion designer tests and explores ideas. The basic function of a design studio or sample room is to enable the designer to produce a prototype or final sample. It will usually include most of the following resources:

Construction techniques

John Lau

Source: Basics Fashion Design 09: Designing Accessories. Exploring the design and construction of bags, shoes, hats and jewellery, 2012, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

All accessories entail different methods of construction and designing an accessory often involves building on the years of skills and knowledge which already exist. For example, Europe - notably France, the UK and Italy - has been creating exceptional accessories with globally recognized craftsmanship for centuries; construction techniques have typically been passed from generation to generation, providing a foundation for a brand's signature style.

Foundation Set-In Sleeve

Sally M. Di Marco

Photography by Erika Yuille

Computer-Assisted Drawings and Draping by Katarina Kozarova

Source: Draping Basics, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The foundation set-in sleeve is used as the basis for the development of other sleeve patterns. The sleeve encircles and covers the arm, varying in length to the wrist. It is a functional and decorative part of the design; an accurate sleeve pattern allows the arm to move freely to various positions, and the style of the sleeve can take a garment from casual to dressy. In the construction process, the sleeve serves as a way to finish the armhole of the garment. Included in the chapter are directi

Foundation Bodice Variations

Sally M. Di Marco

Photography by Erika Yuille

Computer-Assisted Drawings and Draping by Katarina Kozarova

Source: Draping Basics, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Mastering the fundamental techniques of draping the foundation bodice in Chapter 4 laid the groundwork for developing draping variations of the foundation bodice. Foundation bodice variations are accomplished by manipulating the dart excess of the foundation bodice on the dress form. Dart manipulation is the process of relocating the fitting darts to other seamlines on the bodice. The dart excess of the front bodice can be combined into one dart or divided between darts, then placed at one or mor

Dart-Equivalent Bodice Styles

Sally M. Di Marco

Photography by Erika Yuille

Computer-Assisted Drawings and Draping by Katarina Kozarova

Source: Draping Basics, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Other variations of the foundation bodice can be created by converting the dart excess of the fitting darts to dart equivalents. The dart-equivalent bodice styles presented in this chapter— such as the gathered waist bodice, flange dart bodice, and the princess bodice— are accomplished by converting the dart excess to gathers, open-end darts, or shaped seamlines, without changing the fit of the pattern. The dart excess can also be draped as dart-equivalent tucks, flares, pleats, or fully released

Creating a Collection in a Big Company

Kasper Tang Vangkilde

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The creation of a fashion collection in a big fashion company is a complex cooperative process. Various people with diverse skills and experiences, such as designers, brand specialists, clothing technicians, production planners, and others, are involved in the creative process from the idea to the finished collection. HUGO BOSS, a leading European high-end fashion company, is a case in point. Because of the company’s strong product focus, each product group (for example, shirts or knitwear) is ha

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