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Katharine Hamnett

Amber Jane Butchart

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

“58% Don’t Want Pershing” T-Shirt, Katherine Hamnett, 1984

Jessica Draper

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Fashion designer Katherine Hamnett has cleverly employed fashion as a vessel to carry a political message from early in her career, including the infamous T-shirt “58% Don’t Want Pershing,” in which she was photographed meeting the British prime minister, Margaret Thatcher, in 1984. Concealing the shirt under a jacket and revealing it at the last moment was a masterstroke of publicity, both for Hamnett’s brand and her wider concerns. Hamnett has continued her political activism through her fashio

Rethinking fashion design

Alison Gwilt

Source: A Practical Guide to Sustainable Fashion, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

‘I can honestly say that I did not start as an eco brand; I just became one as soon as I was exposed to how much we were throwing out and consuming.’

Ethical Fashion and Ecofashion

Sandy Black

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Although the fashion industry is fast-moving and often dismissed as frivolous, it represents one of the major global economic players. Fashion is one of the few remaining craft-based industries, relying on skilled manual labour for manufacturing across its wide spectrum of levels, which raises particular issues for production. There is an urgent need to reconcile ethical, environmental, social, and personal agendas through future product development and manufacturing cycles in the fashion industr

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