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Jean-Charles de Castelbajac, Spring/Summer 1984

Veronica Maldonado

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

While most of de Castelbajac’s 1984 spring/summer contained serious and sensible clothes, the finale included a number of rectangular silk dresses screen-printed with images of household items such as US dollar bills, calculators, cigarette packs, and Warholian cans of Campbell’s soup. This was not the first time that de Castelbajac had shown these unconventionally shaped dresses—his previous collection had contained dresses emblazoned with internationally famous faces such as that of Charles de

Vivienne Westwood, Red Label, Fall/Winter 1999

Lucy Moyse

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Quirky, colorful, and colliding: with its juxtaposed styles, influences, and prints, Westwood created a discordant harmony in her fall/winter Red Label collection of 1999. It was the sixth collection that Westwood had produced for her Red Label line, and it was a rapid departure from those of other designers that season. Among Westwood’s peers, the key trends were plain fabrics and creamy, muted colors; Westwood clashed brights, checks, and prints. In contrast to the clean, understated, minimalis

Antoni & Alison

Vanessa Semmens

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Wrap Dress, Diane von Furstenberg, 1974

Linda Welters

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The name of Diane von Furstenberg (originally von Fürstenberg) is inextricably linked to the wrap dress that she introduced to American women in 1974. Within two years, she had sold over two million units, a feat that landed her on the cover of the 22 March 1976 issue of Newsweek. The popularity of her sexy, printed, jersey wrap dress waned in the late 1970s. When renewed interest in 1970s styles surfaced in the late 1990s, Diane von Furstenberg reintroduced the wrap dress. Other leading designer

The Textile Tradition of Malaysia and Its Impact on Dress

Adline Abdul Ghani

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Maritime trade linked the Malay Peninsula to the world from as early as the first to the eleventh centuries. With the Indian Ocean to the west and the South China Sea to the east, the peninsula held a focal position along two major sailing routes. As an entrepôt connecting the East and West, the peninsula was also constantly exposed to new cultures, influences, ideas, technologies, and materials, and throughout history, trade activity in general has been inextricably linked to developments in loc

Uzbek Textiles

Carter Malik

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

After the creation of the independent republic of Uzbekistan in 1991, Uzbek textiles, with their brilliant color combinations and decorative exuberance, drew much interest from the international community and fashion experts. Silk wall hangings, ceremonial robes, and ikat dresses from the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries began to appear more often in private collections, galleries, museums, and boutiques around the world. Khan atlas (silk satin-weave ikat), suzani embroidery (needlework)

African Print Textiles from China

Nina Sylvanus

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The power of the dressed body to mediate notions of self and society while projecting futures despite economic uncertainty, is significant. Wax print cloth has that special power and holds special value in West African registers of consumption. The display of fashionable wax-print outfits was carefully scrutinized during ceremonial and public events when a person’s fashion-ability, which involved financial and aesthetic capability, was carefully evaluated. Since the late 1990s, the West African t

The Onondaga Silk Company’s ‘American Artist Print Series’ of 1947

Amy Lund and Linda Welters

Source: Twentieth-Century American Fashion 2008

Book chapter

Editors’ Introduction: After the Second World War ended in 1945, most Americans resumed family life. The GI Bill sent many veterans back to school to further their educations. Women gave up their wartime jobs and retreated to their homes to raise children.

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