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Introduction

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

White Lotus, the theme of the funeral that has transported us into the world of fashion designers and the South Delhi business elite, is a fitting metaphor for the key motif of this book. It is also a fitting metaphor for the ethnographic journey in which this work is grounded and for its analytical angle. Like the lotus, the beauties ritualof Indian fashion and heritage luxuryheritage luxury cannot be conceived without their juxtaposition, without the mud from which they grow and that brings the

Producing Cosmopolitanism, Hierarchy and Social Cohesion

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The second chapter develops the theme of imagined economy and India’s superpowerdom by focusing on the symptomatic commodification of past and heritage in fashion design. It does so by zooming onto the complex material and ideological production of traditional chikan embroidery from Lucknow, a city remembered for its past opulence, cosmopolitanism and luxurious lifestyle. It traces the movement of this embroidery, popular with India’s leading designers, from the local networks of its material pro

Design Genius and his Ghost Others

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The third chapter turns to the tensed relations between design and craft. Developing further the case of chikan embroidery, as it moves from villages to fashion boutiques, the chapter analyses the ways in which material labour is artificially separated from immaterial labour. It shows how the designers’ narratives about creativity, innovation and artistic genius systematically push craftspeople into invisibility, inferiority and passivity, and deny their creativity, individuality and agency. The

Charitable Non-Love and Philanthrocapitalism

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Chapter 4 further develops the theme of power relations between design and craft and between the rich and the poor. Many designers working with craftspeople also run non-governmental organizations to ‘empower’ these workers, while cultivating the rhetoric of ethical business and philanthropy, and offering their customers in addition to luxurious clothing also good conscience. Such NGOs and trusts become effective tools of co-option of the village workforce into the capitalist system and reproduce

Insubordinations of the Laughing Craftswoman

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

This chapter returns back to the villages surrounding Lucknow, where women embroider the luxurious fabrics for the elites while being patronized by the designers, their NGOs and discourses of ‘ethical business’. Recognizing the destructive power of such efforts and the potential violence inherent in benevolence, the craftswomen use often irony and laughter when confronted with patronizing discourses that position them as vulnerable, poor and in constant need of rescue. They mock the designers and

Conclusion

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The conclusion reviews the central points of the work, focusing especially on the power dynamics between the producers and designers, the poor and the rich, the rise of expert privilege and the logic of philanthrocapitalism as an instrument of power. It claims that the current philanthrocapitalism that has taken elite India by storm is deeply neo-feudal in its nature while being wrapped up in rhetoric of good intentions. As such it is a telling sign of the times of brutally rising socio-economic

Alexandre Herchcovitch

Elizabeth Kutesko

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Yohji Yamamoto, Spring/Summer 1994

Nadya Wang

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

For Yohji Yamamoto’s spring/summer 1994 collection, white makes an appearance in nearly every look—and these were created with layers, as the fashion designer continued working on redefining men’s wardrobes. Following the trends for the season, several versions of the classic white button-down shirt were presented, including longer versions akin to the Moroccan djellaba. Stripes were also seen on various items of clothing. The collection received mixed reviews from fashion critics.

Evacuation

Geraldine Howell

Source: Wartime Fashion. From Haute Couture to Homemade, 1939–1945, 2012, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Yohji Yamamoto

Bonnie English

Source: Japanese Fashion Designers. The Work and Influence of Issey Miyake, Yohji Yamamoto and Rei Kawakubo, 2011, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Yamamoto and Kawakubo brought the beauty of poverty to the most glamorous stage of the world—the catwalks of Paris. In their 1981 joint collection, they paraded garments which symbolized neediness, destitution and hardship—clothing that appeared to have been picked up from rag-bags. They were entirely black in colour and irregular in shape, with oddly positioned pockets and fastenings. Their size appeared voluminous, as if the space between the external garment and the body had been exaggerated,

Dress and Fashion in Argentina

Laura Novik and Regina A. Root

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean, 2005, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Argentine fashion has often been intimately connected to the workings of culture, citizenship, and social change. Whether considering the elongated tortoiseshell hair combs from the nineteenth century or recycled garments from the 1980s, analysts of the multivalent characteristics of dress in Argentina, especially in the urban environs of Buenos Aires, address a host of social and political identities as well as larger cultural processes. When a scholar of Argentine fashion is asked to discuss te

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