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Dress and Textiles in Transition: The Sungudi Sari Revival of Tamilnadu, India

Kala Shreen

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice 2015

Book chapter

What is sungudi? A craftsperson ties a thread around a tiny portion of fabric, knots it tightly and repeats. Once the fabric is dyed and the knots untied, the previously knotted areas will transform into tiny dots (Plate 24. Traditionally sungudi was used for cotton saris. Thousands of such dots decorate a sungudi sari; it contains 20,000 knots on average. Depending on the number of knots tied, a sungudi sari may take seven to fifteen days to make. According to the documents produced by the Gover

How Blue Jeans went Green: The Materiality of an American Icon

Bodil Birkœbwk Olesen

Source: Global Denim 2011

Book chapter

First they built the country’s infrastructure, then they populated it with a collective identity

Individualizing Japanese Student Uniforms

Brian J. McVeigh

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In some cultures, sociopolitical environments encourage theatricality, rituality, and selves that are self-consciously performed, so that the bifurcation of the self into genuine expressions and social masks is more salient. The reasons behind this “splitting of the self” vary from place to place and from period to period. In any case, the need to separate the personal self from the public persona, backstage orchestrations from front-stage performances, and behind-the-curtains from before-the-foo

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