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Kimono and Raglan Designs

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The following sleeve variations are used within the different armhole openings for garment designs—the raglan sleeve and the Kimono sleevekimono sleeve. The kimono sleeve is developed in conjunction with the dartless shirt, whereas the raglan sleeve is developed in conjunction with the torso/blouse. These sleeves are used to create a variety of sleeve designs for dresses, blouses, and shirts.

Making and Marketing

Sheila Cliffe

Source: The Social Life of Kimono. Japanese Fashion Past and Present, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The market research data in the “Kimono industryIndustry White Paper” revealed the strong downward trend in kimono sales after the economic bubble in the mid-1980s, see Chapter 3, Chart 3.1. The reasons were not only the increasingly poor state of the economy, but, as explained in that chapter, the unwieldy distribution system associated with a crafts-based industry and also the perceptions about kimono being expensive and difficult to wear that had been created by the industry itself. The effect

Wearers and Wardrobes

Sheila Cliffe

Source: The Social Life of Kimono. Japanese Fashion Past and Present, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Wardrobe(s)Wardrobe(s)wardrobe studiesThe fashion fashionsystemsystem is realized in the creation of the fashion items, and in their diffusion to the public through mediamedia images. However, a fashion system does not exist without fashion leaders and followers. If there are no wearers, then there is no fashion. This chapter investigates kimono wearing practice through a wardrobe survey of kimono wearerskimono wearers, discussion of kimono group(s)groups, and also through interviews with kimono

In Press and Picture: Kimono Discourse

Sheila Cliffe

Source: The Social Life of Kimono. Japanese Fashion Past and Present, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

This chapter examines kimono in printed texts, both writtenwritten and visual. This is important because printed text is largely responsible for the creation of trends and their diffusion among groups of consumers; thus it plays a key role in the fashion cycle. As Chapters 1–3 show, the written word is a key source for finding out about kimono in the past, as even when fabric or garments remain, these alone cannot enlighten us about their usage. Novels, trading tradingdocumentsdocuments, and patt

Mode Becomes Modern: Meiji to Twenty-First Century

Sheila Cliffe

Source: The Social Life of Kimono. Japanese Fashion Past and Present, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Kon’s work showed that at the beginning of the 1950s, half of the women walking in GinzaGinza were wearing western clothing, which was on the increase as kimono wearing declined. cultureJapaneseJapanese women did not suddenly change from kimono to western dressdress, but even those who stayed in kimono brought up their childrenchildren wearing western clothes. Thus kimono began to vanish from everyday life, and a postwar generation grew up without it. So the natural order of a mother teaching her

Tracing Trends in Heian and Edo

Sheila Cliffe

Source: The Social Life of Kimono. Japanese Fashion Past and Present, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

It is probably impossible to pinpoint a moment or location at which fashion started. Chapter 1 outlined five defining aspects of fashion from a body of fashion fashiontheorytheory, and now we return to the story of kimono, in the light of those five aspects. References to clothing used in functional ways or to uphold custom(s)customs, traditions, or the status quo are to be expected, so here the search is for deviations from such norms. The search is for any shreds of evidence of clothing used in

Returning Kimono to the Streets

Sheila Cliffe

Source: The Social Life of Kimono. Japanese Fashion Past and Present, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The hegemonyhegemony that continues to state either directly or indirectly that fashion is a product of European society is facing increasing challenges, and we appear to be in the midst of a paradigm shift. The story of the kimono can be considered one of these challenges. Clothing history in Japan shows an obsession with selfself-presentation going way back to early historical records. While accomplishment in all the arts was desirable for the HeianHeian Edoperiodperiod woman, the most importan

Think Fashion or Tradition?

Sheila Cliffe

Source: The Social Life of Kimono. Japanese Fashion Past and Present, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Kimono lovers may question the necessity for this chapter at all. Why does it matter if kimono is regarded as fashion or tradition anyway? It matters because the WestWest in general, and FranceFrance in particular, have claimed the fashioncenter ofcenter of fashion as their own and still retain a hegemonyhegemony in fashion discourse. Even at a fashion technology conference at the most prestigious fashion fashionschoolschool in TokyoTokyo in 2014, I heard two Japanese professors referring to Pari

Introduction

Sheila Cliffe

Source: The Social Life of Kimono. Japanese Fashion Past and Present, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

How Muslim Women Dress in Israel

Oz Almog

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Islamic/Muslim dressIn order to understand fully Muslim female dress in Israel, some basic concepts will be clarified here. Islam, like most other religions, regulates the behavior of its believers.Linda B. Arthur ed., “Introduction,” Religion, Dress and the Body, Oxford and NY: Berg, 1999, p. 1. Like other faiths, its legal code lays down rules regarding the related fields of clothing and sexuality.Steele, Valerie, Fashion and Eroticism, Ideals of Feminine Beauty from the Victorian Era to the Ja

Fashion and Feminism

Henriette Dahan-Kalev and Shoshana-Rose Marzel

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

civil rightsgenderDuring the French Revolution, dress became an important issue: one of the ways in which revolutionaries’ values were to be obtained and symbolized was through the adoption of class-less styles of clothing, which expressed the ideals of Fraternity, Liberty, and Equality.

Fashion Silhouettes

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

This silhouette hangs straight from the shoulder. At the end of the 1950s, Balenciaga and Givenchy were greatly responsible for introducing this silhouette.

Volume

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Lingerie

Sharon Czachor

Source: Sewing with Knits and Stretch Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Here are some common mistakes and what to do if they happen.

Koji Tatsuno

Elizabeth Glendinning

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Three Generations of Moroccan Fashion Designers

M. Angela Jansen

Source: Moroccan Fashion. Design, tradition and modernity, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The first generation of Moroccan fashion designers consisted of women of the Moroccan élite with no formal training in fashion design. They merely had the advantage of growing up with the luxuryluxury of high-quality craftsmanshipcraftsmanship and learned to sow and embroider at a young age, since this was considered an important part of their privileged educationeducation.Personal communication Tamy Tazi (fashion designer), July 9, 2004. They were ‘products’ of the nationalist movement in that t

Introducing Japanese Fashion, Past and Present

Masafumi Monden

Source: Japanese Fashion Cultures. Dress and gender in contemporary Japan, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Culture refers to behaviour and beliefs that are learned and shared: learned so it is not ‘instinctual’ and shared so it is not individual. Sharing refers to social sharing but there is no limitation as to the boundaries of this sociality. No territorial or historical boundaries are implied as part of the definition. This Wilson, Elizabeththe ‘format’ and ‘product’ theoryunderstanding of culture is open-ended. Leaning is always ongoing as a function of changing circumstances and therefore culture

Sleeve/Bodice Combinations

Kathy K. Mullet

Source: Concepts of Pattern Grading. Techniques for Manual and Computer Grading, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The bodice and sleeve patterns may be combined to produce new styles referred to as sleeve/bodice combinations. Although these styles are actually developed by combining two basic patterns, new grade rules are required when the pattern orientation is different from the basic blocks. For this chapter, new grade rules will be developed for all of the cardinal points. Some manufacturers may develop a new grade rule table for each new style, even though many of the new grade rules will be the same or

Yohji Yamamoto, Spring/Summer 1994

Nadya Wang

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

For Yohji Yamamoto’s spring/summer 1994 collection, white makes an appearance in nearly every look—and these were created with layers, as the fashion designer continued working on redefining men’s wardrobes. Following the trends for the season, several versions of the classic white button-down shirt were presented, including longer versions akin to the Moroccan djellaba. Stripes were also seen on various items of clothing. The collection received mixed reviews from fashion critics.

1868–1944: The Japoniste Revolution, the Deorientalizing of the Orient and the Birth of Couture

Adam Geczy

Source: Fashion and Orientalism. Dress, Textiles and Culture from the 17th to the 21st Century, 2013, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Civilization! Read: ‘the era that has lost almost all its creative power…in jewellery as in furniture’; and in one or the other we are compelled to exhume or import. Import what? Indian bracelets of glass filament and Chinese earrings of cut paper? No. But more often the naïve taste that underlies their making.

Kimono, Raglan, and Drop Shoulder

Helen Joseph-Armstrong

Source: Draping for Apparel Design, 3rd Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The kimono sleeve is in-one with the bodice and draped to follow the slope of the shoulder. The overarm front and back sleeve are joined. The underseams join the front and back at varying distances below the armhole. The sleeve part of the foundation can be draped to any length and can be designed as a flared sleeve, gathered sleeve, or as a lowered shoulder (Figure 1). The kimono is draped as a bodice, but by adding length, it can be draped as a batwing dress, or be adapted to a caftan (Figure 2

Issey Miyake

Bonnie English

Source: Japanese Fashion Designers. The Work and Influence of Issey Miyake, Yohji Yamamoto and Rei Kawakubo, 2011, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Clothes … speak many languages … and have to be seen on the outside … as well as felt on the inside.

Ladakh

Monisha Ahmed

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Situated in the upper reaches of the Himalayan and Karakoram mountain ranges, Ladakh is India’s high-altitude border region, characterized by an extraordinary desertlike landscape where barren mountains thrust toward an intensely blue sky, punctuated by green oases that reveal human habitation. Living in extreme weather conditions where temperatures drop to minus 58 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 50 degrees Celsius) in winter and rise to 104 degrees Fahrenheit (40 degrees Celsius)in summer, Ladakh’s i

Overview of Mongolia

Monisha Ahmed

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Walking down the main street in Ulan Bator, Mongolia’s capital, past gray, crumbling Soviet-era buildings, a woman wearing a blue silk del, or robe, contrasts with the robust man by her side in a sober, gray Western-style suit. Walking alongside them are women in skinny jeans, fitted T-shirts, and stiletto heels. But far from the city, a nomad wears his sheepskin robe, sitting astride his horse. Mongolia has many faces. Probably the most celebrated of these is Chinggis Khaan, better known by his

Dress of the Exile: Tibetan

Monisha Ahmed and Susan Vickery

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The most enduring symbol of Tibet’s struggle for freedom is its national flag—a mountain with two snow lions in the foreground and in the background the sun, surrounded by red and blue bands. With the words “Free Tibet” added, it is embroidered onto T-shirts, screen-printed on bags, made into labels for shawls, and knitted into hats and baby sweaters. The design of the flag dates from the seventh century, when various regiments within the Tibetan army had military flags depicting single or paired

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