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Tweed, Male Fashion, and Modern Masculinities, 1851–1918

Fiona Anderson

Source: Tweed, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Tweed trouserstrousers in “shepherd’s check” patternshepherd’s checks and other fancy woolensfancy patterns remained popular in Britain and Europe in the 1850s and 1860s.JamesLocke, “A Few Facts on the Tweed Trade,” The Border Advertiser, September 18, 1863, p. 3; CliffordGulvin, The Tweedmakers: A History of the Scottish Fancy Woollen Industry 1600–1914 (Newton Abbot: David & Charles, 1973), p. 80; FaridChenoune, A History of Men’s Fashion (Paris: Flammarion, 1993), pp. 84–5. The Juror’s Report

Origins and Early Development of Tweed to 1850

Fiona Anderson

Source: Tweed, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Gulvin, CliffordGulvin argues that improvements made in the Scottish woolen industry between 1770 and the late 1820s helped to lay the foundations for the later successful development of tweed production. Prior to the 1770s, the production of woolens in Scotland was considerably less advanced than that of its neighbor England in terms of its economic success and the quality of its cloths. By the late eighteenth century, England had long been renowned for producing fine broadclothsbroadcloths, whi

Fashion, Whisky and ‘Muscular’ Neo-Royals

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The final chapter turns to the world of elite men and the balancing acts of masculinity that they perform in order to cultivate their image of power.The role played by the ‘rhetoric of muscularity’ is investigated, as is the threat of effeminacy, stemming among other things from their indulgence in luxury and consumption. In order to counteract this threat, men appropriate symbols of low class machismo and incorporate them in the elitist aesthetic, in a similar way in which they use ‘dirty’ subst

Erotic Capital and Benevolence of Vampish Goddesses

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Chapter 6 deals with elite women and their utilization of designer fashion in claiming social power and cultivating erotic capital. Designers in collaboration with their elite female clients develop the cultural tropes of the courtesans and the benevolent goddesses in order to enhance the women’s power in the business sphere dominated by men. Carving a space for themselves in the business world or public life, while being good and moral wives is problematic. In order to be both moral and sexy, th

Design Genius and his Ghost Others

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The third chapter turns to the tensed relations between design and craft. Developing further the case of chikan embroidery, as it moves from villages to fashion boutiques, the chapter analyses the ways in which material labour is artificially separated from immaterial labour. It shows how the designers’ narratives about creativity, innovation and artistic genius systematically push craftspeople into invisibility, inferiority and passivity, and deny their creativity, individuality and agency. The

Insubordinations of the Laughing Craftswoman

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

This chapter returns back to the villages surrounding Lucknow, where women embroider the luxurious fabrics for the elites while being patronized by the designers, their NGOs and discourses of ‘ethical business’. Recognizing the destructive power of such efforts and the potential violence inherent in benevolence, the craftswomen use often irony and laughter when confronted with patronizing discourses that position them as vulnerable, poor and in constant need of rescue. They mock the designers and

The BRIC Countries and Trends

Jenny Lantz

Source: The Trendmakers. Behind the Scenes of the Global Fashion Industry, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Vogue India’s Trend Report appendix for May 2012: The predominately European fashions are sorted into the categories “Loud and Proud,” “Sugar Rush” and “Citrus Punsch.” One startling article features the kurta, a typically Indian garment like a long shirt or tunic, worn by both women and men: “The Indian classic has gone global. International runways showed various versions of the kurta, a must-have for all shapes.” The pictures from Céline, Anna Sui, Junya Watanabe, Louis Vuitton and Dries van N

Retailing in Multinational Markets

Brenda Sternquist and Elizabeth B. Goldsmith

Source: International Retailing, 3rd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

After studying this chapter, you should be able to:

The Movement of Fashion

Elaine Stone and Sheryl A. Farnan

Source: The Dynamics of Fashion, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

We have likened the movement of fashion to the movement of a river. As dress historian James Laver, James,Laver said, in comparing the fashion cycle to a force of nature, “Nothing seems to be able to turn it back until it has spent itself, until it has provoked a reaction by its very excess.”JamesLaver, Taste and Fashion, rev. ed. (London: George G. Harrop, 1946), p. 52. However, just as a river can swell to turbulent flood stage or be slowed or diverted by a dam, so the movement of fashion can b

Angel in the Market Place: The African-Jamaican Higgler 1880–1907

Carol Tulloch

Source: The Birth of Cool. Style Narratives of the African Diaspora, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

higgler (market trader): “A Jamaican Lady” postcardcritical draw ofLike many other African-Jamaicans featured on postcards during the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, this woman’s personal details are lost to us. There is no way of knowing her age. She could be anywhere between forty and sixty. What is suggested that if she was closer to sixty, she was an ex-slave, and if nearer to forty, then her parents were enslaved. Either way, this woman had a direct link to the pre-emancipation

Being Fashionable in the Globalization Era in India: Holy Writing on Garments

Janaki Turaga

Source: Modern Fashion Traditions. Negotiating Tradition and Modernity through Fashion, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Using a case study of ‘holy fashion’ in India, Janaki Turaga explores why this has become so popular in a nation that is grappling with rapid modernization and globalization amid the retention of the traditions and heritage of ancient India. Indicatively, fashion-conscious Indians have embraced a diverse range of ‘secularised sacred’ fashion garments that were previously reserved for believers in culturally prescribed sacred contexts in order to demonstrate fashion and lifestyle statements. Garme

La Mode Retrouvée

Valerie Steele

Source: Paris Fashion. A Cultural History, 3rd Edition, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Chacune de ses robes m’apparaissait comme une ambiance naturelle, nécessaire, comme la projection d’un aspect particulier de son âme.

The Private Life of Paris

Valerie Steele

Source: Paris Fashion. A Cultural History, 3rd Edition, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Dans ces sphères élevés le role de la femme est tout de charme et de seduction. Elle n’a d’autres devoirs à remplir que ceux qui lui sont imposés sous le nom des devoirs de société.

Charles James

Rio Ali

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Hermès

Lauren Bowes

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

The Queen

Fiona Corbridge

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

In 2015, Queen Elizabeth II became Britain’s longest-reigning monarch, having occupied the throne since 1952—over sixty-three years. The royal wardrobe has been of interest to the world since her childhood, and as a young woman, the clothes she wore for royal tours abroad and official visits were very influential. The designs produced for her by British couturiers were copied for the mass market. In the early twenty-first century, the Queen’s immaculate appearance transcends the vagaries of fashi

Ball Gowns

Emma Davenport

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Ball gowns are considered to be the most extravagant category of evening dress. Although balls date back to the Middle Ages, and historically were seen as dance parties to celebrate all manner of occasions, they reemerged as a popular way to introduce eligible women and men into marriageable society during the mid-1800s. Competition for suitors centered on the expense and opulence of a woman’s ball gown. Subsequently, ball gowns have continued to represent ideals of romantic femininity. On the ca

Purple

Emma Davenport

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Associated with cultural symbols of opulence and originality, historically the color purple has been worn to convey wealth and status, in particular by those with royal heritage. More recently, the color purple has been linked with creativity and charisma, often gaining popularity in less conservative Western socioeconomic periods. On the catwalk, a variety of designers have used the color purple, including Chloé, Gianni Versace, Byblos, and Sonia Rykiel. Toward the end of the twentieth century,

Gold

Emma Davenport

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Historically, the color gold was very expensive to produce as it involved creating threads from the scarce mineral known as gold. While associated with cultural symbols of wealth, reverence, and power, the color has also been negatively linked with a lack of taste and conspicuous consumption. On the catwalk, it has been used by a variety of designers including Donna Karan, Yves Saint Laurent, Versace, and Valentino. Since the 1970s, fashion trends associated with the color gold have included club

Bill Blass, Spring/Summer 1984

Michelle Honig

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

This collection was all about simplicity, which led Nina Hyde at the Washington Post to comment, “Blass’s clothes have never been more simple, less contrived.” The hems were short because Blass believed that his couture customers had the money to keep their body in great shape. There were bra-like tops under conservative suits for day, and evening gowns in silk charmeuse draped in silk chiffon. Because of the simplicity of the clothes, the models’ hair was more extreme. Critics commended Blass’s

Bill Blass, Spring/Summer 1988

Michelle Honig

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

This collection was inspired by Matisse paintings that Bill Blass saw while at the National Gallery in Washington. Shown at the Parsons School of Design in New York, the clothes were short and full of froufrou due to the influence of “the sugar daddy of bonbon chic” and designer of the moment Christian Lacroix, and his short, little-girl styles. Hems were well above the knees, which concerned retailers servicing working women needing office-appropriate clothes. Even though critics liked his use o

Donna Karan

Sandra J. Ley

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Introduction: Dress History Now: Terms, Themes and Tools

Charlotte Nicklas and Annebella Pollen

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Terminology is a perpetual difficulty in the study of dress history: how should ‘dress’, ‘fashion’, ‘clothing’ (or ‘clothes’) and ‘costume’ be defined and distinguished from each other? In current scholarship, how do ‘dress history’, ‘fashion history’ and ‘fashion studies’ differ? The meanings of these words and phrases overlap and interconnect, their definitions continuing to challenge researchers (Cumming 2004: 8, 15; Harte 2009: 176; Taylor 2013: 26). Joanne Eicher and Susan Kaiser both emphas

Ali MacGraw

Anne Reimers

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

American actress Ali MacGraw’s outfits and styling in the classic weepie Love Story (1970) were defining for a generation. Her look came to represent the aspirational wardrobe and beauty ideal of the upper middle-class, Ivy League university “preppy,” regularly referenced by American fashion brands. MacGraw’s offscreen style, more bohemian and artistic with floaty dresses and scarves, was equally influential. The designer she is most closely associated with, however, is Halston, and his brand of

Amanda Wakeley

Vanessa Semmens

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

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