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Origins and Early Development of Tweed to 1850

Fiona Anderson

Source: Tweed, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Gulvin, CliffordGulvin argues that improvements made in the Scottish woolen industry between 1770 and the late 1820s helped to lay the foundations for the later successful development of tweed production. Prior to the 1770s, the production of woolens in Scotland was considerably less advanced than that of its neighbor England in terms of its economic success and the quality of its cloths. By the late eighteenth century, England had long been renowned for producing fine broadclothsbroadcloths, whi

Tweed, Male Fashion, and Modern Masculinities, 1851–1918

Fiona Anderson

Source: Tweed, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Tweed trouserstrousers in “shepherd’s check” patternshepherd’s checks and other fancy woolensfancy patterns remained popular in Britain and Europe in the 1850s and 1860s.JamesLocke, “A Few Facts on the Tweed Trade,” The Border Advertiser, September 18, 1863, p. 3; CliffordGulvin, The Tweedmakers: A History of the Scottish Fancy Woollen Industry 1600–1914 (Newton Abbot: David & Charles, 1973), p. 80; FaridChenoune, A History of Men’s Fashion (Paris: Flammarion, 1993), pp. 84–5. The Juror’s Report

The BRIC Countries and Trends

Jenny Lantz

Source: The Trendmakers. Behind the Scenes of the Global Fashion Industry, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Vogue India’s Trend Report appendix for May 2012: The predominately European fashions are sorted into the categories “Loud and Proud,” “Sugar Rush” and “Citrus Punsch.” One startling article features the kurta, a typically Indian garment like a long shirt or tunic, worn by both women and men: “The Indian classic has gone global. International runways showed various versions of the kurta, a must-have for all shapes.” The pictures from Céline, Anna Sui, Junya Watanabe, Louis Vuitton and Dries van N

Retailing in Multinational Markets

Brenda Sternquist and Elizabeth B. Goldsmith

Source: International Retailing, 3rd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

After studying this chapter, you should be able to:

Being Fashionable in the Globalization Era in India: Holy Writing on Garments

Janaki Turaga

Source: Modern Fashion Traditions. Negotiating Tradition and Modernity through Fashion, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Using a case study of ‘holy fashion’ in India, Janaki Turaga explores why this has become so popular in a nation that is grappling with rapid modernization and globalization amid the retention of the traditions and heritage of ancient India. Indicatively, fashion-conscious Indians have embraced a diverse range of ‘secularised sacred’ fashion garments that were previously reserved for believers in culturally prescribed sacred contexts in order to demonstrate fashion and lifestyle statements. Garme

The Private Life of Paris

Valerie Steele

Source: Paris Fashion. A Cultural History, 3rd Edition, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Dans ces sphères élevés le role de la femme est tout de charme et de seduction. Elle n’a d’autres devoirs à remplir que ceux qui lui sont imposés sous le nom des devoirs de société.

Ali MacGraw

Anne Reimers

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

American actress Ali MacGraw’s outfits and styling in the classic weepie Love Story (1970) were defining for a generation. Her look came to represent the aspirational wardrobe and beauty ideal of the upper middle-class, Ivy League university “preppy,” regularly referenced by American fashion brands. MacGraw’s offscreen style, more bohemian and artistic with floaty dresses and scarves, was equally influential. The designer she is most closely associated with, however, is Halston, and his brand of

“The Beauty of Her Hands”: The Glove and the Making of Middle-class Womanhood

Ariel Beaujot

Source: Victorian Fashion Accessories, 2012, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Victorians considered it improper for a woman to appear in public without her gloves and women of the middle and upper classes were encouraged to put on their gloves before crossing the threshold into the street. Women wore gloves in church, at the theater, on promenade, to dances, while shopping, and even to dinner parties hosted in other people’s homes.Anon., Etiquette for All; or, Rules of Conduct for Every Circumstance in Life: With the Laws, Rules, Precepts, and Practices of Good Society (Gl

“The Language of the Fan”: Pushing the Boundaries of Middle-class Womanhood

Ariel Beaujot

Source: Victorian Fashion Accessories, 2012, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

In the nineteenth century the British tried to revive the art of fanmaking in part in order to address what Victorians had come to call the “surplus women question.” This debate, which centered around definitions of what type of woman a middle-class lady should be and what her place should be within society, came to the fore because of statistics revealed by the 1851 Census. Victorians exaggerated the census data in order to emphasize the seriousness of having a population of women who had no pla

“Underneath the Parasol”: Umbrellas as Symbols of Imperialism, Race, Youth, Flirtation, and Masculinity

Ariel Beaujot

Source: Victorian Fashion Accessories, 2012, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Narratives are a way for human beings of the past and present to understand their experiences and guide their actions.Somers, “The Narrative Constitution of Identity,” 613–14. An important metanarrative of Victorian society was the advent of democracy and constitutional government. Every British school child of the nineteenth century knew the progressive narrative of the rise of parliamentary democracy beginning with the Magna Carta, passing through the “Glorious Revolution,” and ending with the

“The Real Thing”: The Celluloid Vanity Set and the Search for Authenticity

Ariel Beaujot

Source: Victorian Fashion Accessories, 2012, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

By the end of the nineteenth century it was generally understood that the elephant population was in serious crisis because of the ivory trade.R. F.du Toit, S. N.Stuart, and D.H.M.Cumming, African Elephants and Rhinos: Sattus Survey and Conservation Action Plan (Gland, Switzerland: Nature Conservation Bureau, 1990), 3. Between 1800 and 1850 ivory imports into the United Kingdom increased from 119 tons to 458 tons.AbdulSheriff, Slaves, Spices and Ivory in Zanzibar: Integration of an East African C

Conclusion

Ariel Beaujot

Source: Victorian Fashion Accessories, 2012, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

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