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Ann Demeulemeester, Spring/Summer 1992

Elisa De Wyngaert

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The spring/summer collection of 1992 was Ann Demeulemeester’s first fashion show in Paris. She presented her looks alongside other young avant-garde Belgian designers, including Martin Margiela. The silhouettes of the collection featured some elements which would later become known as Demeulemeester’s signatures: feathers, a strong cut, and a kind of androgyny blended with poetic femininity. Yet these silhouettes also deviated from the monochromatic feel of her later work. Furthermore, Patti Smit

Dai Rees

Alessandro Esculapio

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Video Art And Videophilia

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art 2015

Book chapter

From the beginning, video art was understood as anti-establishment. It can lay claim to a unique origin: unlike other visual arts media, it was forged in the crucible of contemporary, rather than modern, classical or ancient, art. It had no tradition so was not beholden to it. It had no canon so could start from scratch in response to its immediate circumstances. It had no critical discourse so was not accountable to it. It promised to democratize the production of images. Video art emerged at th

Kansai Yamamoto

Elizabeth Glendinning

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Helmut Lang

Elizabeth Kutesko

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Ann Demeulemeester

Elizabeth Kutesko

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Dries Van Noten

Sandra J. Ley

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Marithé + François Girbaud (house)

Sandra J. Ley

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Grace Coddington

Katerina Pantelides

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

This article explores Grace Coddington’s role as a style icon throughout her careers of model, stylist, and creative director. Coddington was born in 1941 in Anglesey, Wales, and as a teenager, emulated Audrey Hepburn. In 1959 she moved to London to become a model and worked with youthful, avant-garde designers and photographers in the 1960s. Coddington’s signature style, her red mane and eclectic combination of vintage and modern pieces, emerged in the 1970s when she was a fashion editor at Brit

Politics and Protests on the Catwalk

Else Skjold

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

There is no better place from which to voice a critique of fashion than on the catwalk itself. Particularly since the mid-nineteenth century, and more intensely throughout the twentieth century, single individuals and groupings in Western society have challenged dominating standards and conventions of fashion through what they wear and create. But most of this critique has taken place outside the catwalk, in the shape of antifashion movements. However, from the 1970s and onward, there has been a

Understanding Fashion Through The Museum

José Teunissen

Source: Fashion and Museums. Theory and Practice 2014

Book chapter

visual artWhen “Streetstyle: From Sidewalk to Catwalk” opened at London’s Victoria & Albert Museum (V&A) in 1994, it was one of the most significant fashion exhibitions to be based on cultural theory and the book Subculture by Dick Hebdige (Steele 2008: 23).The exhibition was accompanied by the publication of the book Streetstyle by anthropologist Ted Polhemus, who as its creator and curator interpreted the exhibition from an anthropological viewpoint. For the first time, the starting point was n

Gay Men’s Style: From Macaroni to Metrosexual

Adam Geczy and Vicki Karaminas

Source: Queer Style 2013

Book chapter

The term for the particular form of male style from the late eighteenth century, macaroni (or maccaroni), did in fact come from eating pasta (the Greek makaria literally means ‘food made from barley’), which had become fashionable in the 1760s through men who had returned to England after exploring the European continent, especially Italy, on the Grand Tour. Macaronis typically took pains to announce their difference in outlandish examples of foreign clothing that was either foreign—French and It

Issey Miyake

Bonnie English

Source: Japanese Fashion Designers. The Work and Influence of Issey Miyake, Yohji Yamamoto and Rei Kawakubo 2011

Book chapter

Clothes … speak many languages … and have to be seen on the outside … as well as felt on the inside.

Yohji Yamamoto

Bonnie English

Source: Japanese Fashion Designers. The Work and Influence of Issey Miyake, Yohji Yamamoto and Rei Kawakubo 2011

Book chapter

Yamamoto and Kawakubo brought the beauty of poverty to the most glamorous stage of the world—the catwalks of Paris. In their 1981 joint collection, they paraded garments which symbolized neediness, destitution and hardship—clothing that appeared to have been picked up from rag-bags. They were entirely black in colour and irregular in shape, with oddly positioned pockets and fastenings. Their size appeared voluminous, as if the space between the external garment and the body had been exaggerated,

The Next Wave of Designers

Bonnie English

Source: Japanese Fashion Designers. The Work and Influence of Issey Miyake, Yohji Yamamoto and Rei Kawakubo 2011

Book chapter

In Paris in October 2006, Naoki Takizawa’s last collection showing for Issey Miyake inspired a standing ovation from the audience. It signalled the launching of his own label, which was financed by the House of Issey Miyake. Since 1982, working together at the Miyake Design Studio, Miyake trained Takizawa in the art of fashion design and fashion showings. Takizawa has become renowned for combining a mixture of new and different materials in order to discover unexpected forms. Using a disciplined

Spectacle and Sexuality: Music, Clothes and Queer Bodies

Janice Miller

Source: Fashion and Music 2011

Book chapter

In a band which might be understood to have a close relation to the emo subculture, whether technically part of it or not a creative focus on notions of death and deathliness would seem wholly appropriate. Growing partly out of the American punk scene of the 1990s and partly also a substrata of goth, emo shares similar ‘primary values … expressed through visually perceptible aspects of personal style: dress, coiffure, jewelry and tattoos and other bodily modifications. Goths are determined to fac

Belgium

Karlijn Bronselaer

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Belgium played a vital role in the industrialization of the European textile industry. Belgian society changed very quickly due to industrialization during the first half of the nineteenth century. From about the 1820s on the fashionable silhouette in West Europe was the hourglass. Although the average Belgian had neither time nor money for fashion, improved production methods and sewing machines made corsets more affordable. Later, the Art Nouveau or Jugendstil movement (ca. 1890–1920), with its

Fashion and Art

Adam Geczy

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The connection between fashion and art has a complex and surprising evolution. In the first instance it is bound up with the birth of the fashion system itself, but more recent developments in the early twenty-first century in both art and fashion have rendered the once discernible boundaries far less distinct. The increase of global markets and corporate interests in public galleries and museums, and the manner in which the success of exhibitions is measured according to visitor numbers, not to

East Asian Fashion Designers in Local and International Markets

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Fashion is often equated with modern European high fashion, and since it is normally seen as a specifically Western development, its role in the creation of style by non-Western designers, especially by East Asian designers, used to be generally unrecognized and ignored. East Asians started to adopt a Western style of dress only recently. Western clothing and fashion appeared in Japan during the Meiji era (1868–1912), and it was a desired symbol of modernization encouraged by Emperor Meiji. Almos

When Is Innovation?

Ingrid Loschek

Source: When Clothes Become Fashion. Design and Innovation Systems 2009

Book chapter

Since Schumpeter, innovations have been understood as inventions that have asserted themselves. This implies two completely different processes—the process of inventing and that of realisation. The innovation, the newly created, presupposes inventiveness, that is the ‘invention’ (cf. p. 31). The association and lack of terminological differentiation between invention and innovation is frequently detrimental to stringent analysis, and the generic term innovation degenerates into a nebulous catchwo

Type 2: Rei Kawakubo, Issey Miyake, and Yohji Yamamoto Construction of the Japanese Avant-Garde Fashion

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: The Japanese Revolution in Paris Fashion. Dress, Body, Culture 2004

Book chapter

Miyake was born in Hiroshima in 1939, the same year as Kenzo. Unlike Kenzo and Yamamoto who formally studied fashion at Bunka School of Fashion, Miyake graduated from one of art universities, Tama University, where he majored in graphic design. In 1965, after graduating from Tama, he went to Paris, three months after Kenzo. They knew each other in Tokyo (Quinn 1984: 12), and both studied tailoring and dressmaking at l’Ecole de la Chambre Syndicale de la Couture for a year. In 1966, he landed an a

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