Results: Text (15) Images (0)

You searched for

Modify your search terms or add filters

Filtered by

Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 15 of 15 (1 pages)
    Page 1 of 1
The Consumption of Moroccan Fashion

M. Angela Jansen

Source: Moroccan Fashion. Design, tradition and modernity 2015

Book chapter

Dress is more than the clothes we put on our bodies. As Ruth Barnes and Joanne Eicher (1992: 15) formulate it, it is everything that a person does to or puts on one’s own body, including perfume, make-up, tattoos, hair extensions, etc. as well as the phenomena of anorexia, bulimia, plastic surgery, etc. ‘Dress is the sum of bodybody bodymodificationsmodifications and/or supplements displayed by a person in communicating with the other’ (1992: 15). For example, a Moroccan woman can wear a modest j

Moroccan Lifestyle Media

M. Angela Jansen

Source: Moroccan Fashion. Design, tradition and modernity 2015

Book chapter

As was discussed in Chapter 2, the Moroccan nationalist movementnationalist movement brought, among other things, tremendous changes in the lives, consciousness and ambitionambitions of Moroccan women by the middle of the twentieth century. More women were enjoying an educationeducation and soon they discovered the impact the written word could have on their cause. Therefore a first generation of Moroccan women’s magazines introduced in the 1960s were all run by renowned feminists and had a stron

The Impact of Foreign Fashion Brands

M. Angela Jansen

Source: Moroccan Fashion. Design, tradition and modernity 2015

Book chapter

What is a fashion industry? The way Welters and Lillethun (2001: xxix) describe it, a fashion industry requires several components such as: a market economy that provides wealth; adequate technology to make apparelapparel items; a distribution system that disseminates ideas about fashion as well as the products themselves; and a system democratizationof fashionof fashion innovation and adoption. Also, they say, a fashion industry is dependent on a rapidly changing infrastructure influenced by art

Conclusion

M. Angela Jansen

Source: Moroccan Fashion. Design, tradition and modernity 2015

Book chapter

The main aim of this research has been to analyse Moroccan fashion as a materialization of social, cultural, political, economic and religious developments in Moroccan society, because until now Moroccan fashion has been predominantly studied as physical objects in which the materials and construction of the garments have been given primacy over their social and cultural meanings. Simultaneously, this research has aimed to contest prevailing misconceptions concerning traditional dress as being st

Moroccan Fashion as Tradition

M. Angela Jansen

Source: Moroccan Fashion. Design, tradition and modernity 2015

Book chapter

Throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, there have been a number of political events that have had an important impact on the development of Moroccan fashion. Under the French FrenchProtectorateProtectorate, for example, it was decided to separate the new European city centres from the indigenousindigenous Arab city centres. This resulted in a cultural buffer against French cultural influences, allowing the continuity of a Moroccan lifestylelifestyle. Over time, this led to two more

Three Generations of Moroccan Fashion Designers

M. Angela Jansen

Source: Moroccan Fashion. Design, tradition and modernity 2015

Book chapter

The first generation of Moroccan fashion designers consisted of women of the Moroccan élite with no formal training in fashion design. They merely had the advantage of growing up with the luxuryluxury of high-quality craftsmanshipcraftsmanship and learned to sow and embroider at a young age, since this was considered an important part of their privileged educationeducation.Personal communication Tamy Tazi (fashion designer), July 9, 2004. They were ‘products’ of the nationalist movement in that t

Introduction

M. Angela Jansen

Source: Moroccan Fashion. Design, tradition and modernity 2015

Book chapter

It is only in the past fifteen years that ‘fashion of traditional dress’ gained the attention of social scientists, simply because it was considered a contradictio in terminis. It was probably John Flügel (1950 [1930]: 129–30) who set the trend in the 1930s by introducing his dichotomy ‘fixed’ versus ‘modish’ costume, whereby ‘fixed costume changes slowly in time, and its whole value depends, to some extent, upon its permanence’. Modish costume, on the other hand, he explains, ‘changes very rapid

Morocco

Cynthia J. Becker

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Morocco has long been a crossroads between Europe, the Middle East, and sub-Saharan Africa, and dress reflects the richness of its history as well as its geographic and cultural diversity. Forty to sixty percent of the Moroccan population is Berber, and many Berbers have retained their indigenous language. After the Phoenicians and then the Romans settled in Morocco and encountered the Berbers, Arabs moved into Morocco in the seventh century, founding the city of Fes and gradually converting the

Dance Costumes

Margaret A. Deppe

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The category of dance costume is a specialized type of dress usually reserved for performances and masquerade. In North Africa as elsewhere, dance costumes are worn for performances at special events and in entertainment venues. Three general categories of dance in North Africa are raks shaabi (popular dance), raks beledi (country dance), and raks sharqi (eastern dance).

Moroccan Fashion Designers

Elizabeth Kutesko

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Since the last decade of the twentieth century and with the turn of the twenty-first, a new generation of Moroccan fashion designers and photographers has played a part on the international fashion stage, combining Western-style fashions with elements of traditional Arab and Berber dress to subvert both European and Moroccan sartorial conventions. While notable names such as Amine Bendriouch, Alber Elbaz, Jean-Charles de Caselbajac, Hisham Oumlil, Aziz Bekkaoui, Samira Haddouchi, and Hassan Hajja

Twenty-First-Century Moroccan Women’s Dress

Elizabeth Kutesko

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In Morocco in the twenty-first century, traditional forms of women’s clothing exist side by side with Western consumer fashions, allowing Moroccan women to express their economic, social, cultural, political, and religious identities through their choice of dress. Examining Moroccan women’s dress, predominantly in urban areas, for its material properties and expressive capabilities offers insights into the complexities of individual and collective identities in Morocco in the early twenty-first c

Veils and the Hajj

Elisha P. Renne

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Veils have historically been associated with women’s performance of hajj (the pilgrimage to Mecca) in Saudi Arabia, as documented in the travel narratives of attending pilgrims. While pilgrimage to Mecca prior to the mid-twentieth century entailed extended, sometimes lifelong, travel over land and by sea, airplanes have allowed many more Muslim men and women from around the world to perform hajj since the 1950s.This increase has exposed Muslim women to many different styles of veils worn in count

North Africa

Fred T. Smith

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

North Africa consists of Egypt in the east and the lands to the west, or Maghreb (the Arabic term for “the place of sunset”). Because of a rich archaeological record, a substantial amount of information exists on ancient Egyptian textiles. In ancient Egypt, loincloths and linen kilts with a belt were common items of male clothing, while women wore tight-fitting dresses or skirts. Women’s dresses became looser in the New Kingdom and were decorated with pleats and folds. Both sexes wore woolen cloa

Awakening The Senses: The Aesthetics of Moroccan Berber Dress

Cynthia Becker

Source: Dress Sense. Emotional and Sensory Experiences of the Body and Clothes 2007

Book chapter

Book chapter

The dress associated with weddings teaches gender roles, instructing the bride what is expected of her in society. Although gender roles and opportunities continue to change for young Ait Khabbash women, the process of dressing the bride teaches her the ancestral values and behaviors expected of a married woman. The bride’s dressing ceremony refers to the night before the actual wedding and specifically designates the occasion when the bride is dressed in her wedding clothes. The act of dressing

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 15 of 15 (1 pages)
Page 1 of 1