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Travelling the Street Style Blogosphere: Amateur Anthropology from Around the Globe

Brent Luvaas

Source: Street Style. An Ethnography of Fashion Blogging, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

‘People urban cosmopolitanism of Helsinki (Finland)Karjalainen, SampoHel Looks (blog)Helsinki (Finland)urban cosmopolitanism ofHelsinki (Finland)punk rocker culture inHelsinki (Finland)watching has always been my obsession and my hobby’, Liisa Jokinen told me, as we chatted in June of 2012 via the voice-over-internet protocol of Skype. ‘I’ve always been interested in peoples’ clothes, why [they] wear certain things, and the reason behind their outfits, what kinds of stories [go into them]. So it

History, Art, and Plastic Bags: Viewing South Africa Through Fashion

Victoria L. Rovine

Source: Modern Fashion Traditions. Negotiating Tradition and Modernity through Fashion, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Victoria Rovine develops a fascinating reflection as to how a prosaic global commodity, namely, the ubiquitous plastic bag, has become a fashion icon in South Africa. Labelled as ‘China bags’ (reflecting their country of manufacture), Rovine explores the collections of two South African fashion designers who base their work around the potential of these plastic containers. They have transformed the global bag into a distinctively local fashion icon as a symbol of the mixed messages of postmoderni

You Should Understand, It’s A Freedom Thing: The Stoned Cherrie–Steve Biko T-Shirt

Carol Tulloch

Source: The Birth of Cool. Style Narratives of the African Diaspora, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

In the face you can have all kinds of political landscapes

Introduction

Carol Tulloch

Source: The Birth of Cool. Style Narratives of the African Diaspora, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

I once asked my father if it became compulsory for all men to wear flared trousers, what would he do? He replied, “Go in the nuddy [nude]”. I laughed at his response, thinking he was just old fashioned. I must have been about eleven or twelve and my idea of a well-dressed man came in the form of Jimi Hendrix who reigned supreme in such pants. This was the period of revolutionary dress for the young.

Tsonga Dress and Fashion

Rayda Becker

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

All Tsonga in South Africa originate from Mozambique. A small group, they have a complex history involving various migrations and names; Tsonga now primarily denotes a language. In the early 1900s Tsonga women wore skirts made of imported cotton, and beaded jewelry. Later the skirts became shorter and fuller and are now made of wool. The main changes over the last century involve the upper body, the beaded necklaces worn in the 1930s giving way to blouses and T-shirts, worn with the minceka, two

South Africa Overview

Patricia Davison

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

South Africa offers a rich field for exploring the symbolic language of dress in the varied contexts of everyday life. It is a country of many cultural layers, with eleven official languages and a relatively recent history of racial segregation and imposed ethnically based “homelands.” After 1994, however, when South Africa became a multiparty democracy, the new nation aspired to be united in its diversity, even though the inequalities of the past remained embedded in many social institutions and

Pedi, Ndebele, and Ntwane Dress and Beadwork

Sandra Klopper

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The Pedi, Ndebele, and Ntwane communities developed close links during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in what is now South Africa’s Mpumalanga province. Some of their beadwork and rituals are almost identical. Today there are two Ndebele groups, the Manala and Ndzundza. Influenced by missionaries, the former gradually lost touch with traditional dress, while the Ndzundza, forcibly indentured to white farmers in the 1880s, strove for cultural cohesion, developing beadwork associated with i

Migrant Workers, Production, and Fashion

Sandra Klopper and >Fiona Rankin-Smith

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

South Africa’s migrant labor system first began in the 1850s when African men from rural communities flocked to the newly discovered diamond and gold fields on the Witwatersrand in search of work. Originally miners brought their own clothing to work in the mines, primarily shorts. Eventually the mining companies, to protect their human resources, decided it was in their best interest to provide rubber boots, coveralls, and hard hats to protect miners working in a very dangerous occupation. By the

Women’s Cooperatives and Self-Help Artists

Kimberly Miller and Brenda Schmahmann

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

During the 1980s and 1990s, a number of art-making cooperatives were set up to address the dire poverty of communities in South Africa as well as so-called homelands such as Gazankulu and Bophuthatswana. Some catered to men and women, coupling an imperative to generate income for members with an agenda to protest against apartheid through the creation of art. The majority, however, catered specifically to women who, in addition to being denied human rights and economic opportunities through apart

Archaeological Evidence

Fred T. Smith

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

In Africa, the human body has always been a focus for creative expression. Each culture has evolved its own patterns of dress and associated symbolic system, yet cross-cultural influences and change have constantly occurred. A society’s political structure and religious institutions can determine the type of dress used. Societies with a centralized organization often have elaborate, even grandiose programs of visual culture associated with leadership. The ruler or an elite group often reserves th

Southern Africa

Juliette Leeb-du Toit

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The designation southern Africa marks a region shaped by cultural distinctiveness coupled with early settler and colonial boundaries that are the result of economic and legislative control. This resulted in the demarcation of specific countries inflected by European and British settler influence and occupancy—namely, South Africa, Botswana, Namibia, Lesotho, and Swaziland. However, these boundaries belie cultural and economic exchange that transcended such artificial geographic boundaries. Migran

Nguni, Zulu, and Xhosa Dress and Beadwork

Gary van Wyk

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The Nguni peoples of South Africa include the Xhosa- and Zulu-speaking peoples of the southeast and northeast coast. Despite shared distant Nguni origins, they are differentiated today by language, culture, tradition, history, and other factors. They have in common remarkable traditions of beadwork, which, together with those of the Ndebele (a Nguni people of the interior), are outstanding among African beadwork.

Africa

Lanie Denslow

Source: World Wise. What to Know Before You Go, 2006, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

I Wish I’d Known

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