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Icons of Modernity: Sixties Fashion and Youth Culture

Heike Jenss

Source: Fashioning Memory. Vintage Style and Youth Culture 2015

Book chapter

One of the first media reports on mods, under the headline “Faces without Shadows” and published in Town Magazine in September 1962, provides insight into the consumer practices of these youths (see partial reprint in Rawlings 2000: 42–7). The article revolves around the fifteen-year-old Feld, MarkMark Feld (later, Marc Bolan of the band T-Rex) and his twenty-year-old friends Sugar, PeterPeter Sugar and Simmonds, MichaelMichael Simmonds living in the London neighborhood Stoke Newington. They desc

Quant, Mary

Amy de la Haye

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

London as a Fashion City

Edwina Ehrman

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

London is part of a global fashion system, known in international circles for its fashion heritage and diversity, its hybrid sense of style, its vibrant consumer culture, and the creativity of its fashion graduates. It is equated with originality and experimentation and with styles that draw on a wide vocabulary of cultural references. The media tend to the innovative and radical, and the exposure given to designers who embody these qualities weights perceptions of London. The city plays a key ro

Gender

Gertrud Lehnert

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The basic distinction between female and male dress in the Western world is between women’s skirts and men’s bifurcated trousers. Only in the twentieth century was this abandoned—but in one direction, since, even today, men do not wear skirts, despite some attempts by fashion designers. This does not indicate that trousers are more natural for men, but that in the West, they denote supremacy and masculinity. From the late Middle Ages onwards, increasing emphasis was put on gender differentiation

Youthquake Fashions

Joel Lobenthal

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Throughout the 1950s, British fashion was dominated by the Paris couture, and the long shadow it cast over London couturiers such as Norman Hartnell and Hardy Amies. British manufacturers followed the parameters laid out by the high end of fashion. But the emerging generation wanted something entirely different and entirely their own. They were out of sympathy with the mores of expensive made-to-order clothing. “The couture was for kept women,” said Barbara Hulanicki, who opened the London boutiq

Trends

Maria Mackinney-Valentin

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

One of the defining features of fashion can be said to be the constant change in its visual expression. The term trend is often employed to describe the motor that drives fashion; it can refer to both fashion change (innovation) and fashion adoption behavior (diffusion). A trend may involve a certain item of dress, a way of wearing an item, or a certain style, silhouette, material, color, or pattern. In fashion theory, fashion process and fashion cycle are sometimes used as synonyms for trend.

Boutique

Michele Majer

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Small retailing establishments were not new to the post-World War II period. In the first half of the twentieth century, Paris, London, and New York all had specialty shops. Usually owned by a single designer or proprietor, these operated between the highly exclusive couture houses and the large department stores, and catered to a well-to-do clientele with an emphasis on personal attention to the customer.

England

Naomi E.A. Tarrant

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In 1800, the people of England dressed in the general West European clothing style that was worn by all fashionable people. Wealth determined what a person could afford to wear but not the style. There was no folk dress, so the general impression was that wealthy people wore the same styles as their workers, with only the quality showing the difference. The poor acquired garments from secondhand clothes dealers or as gifts from wealthier family members or friends, charities, and employers, as wel

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