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Conclusion: “Wrapping it Up”

Arti Sandhu

Source: Indian Fashion. Tradition, Innovation, Style, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

When I say Rani Pink to you, you get it. I don’t have to explain the shade to you. Your dadi or your nani would have passed it on to you.dadi–paternal grandmother, nani–maternal grandmother. You know it consciously and unconsciously. (Garg 2013)Cited from “Raw Mango: A Conversation with Sanjay Garg.” Park Magazine, Vol. 8, 2013, “Color,” p. 31. Available from http://www.theparkhotels.com/living-magazine.html (accessed July 17, 2013).

Dress and Textiles in Transition: The Sungudi Sari Revival of Tamilnadu, India

Kala Shreen

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

What is sungudi? A craftsperson ties a thread around a tiny portion of fabric, knots it tightly and repeats. Once the fabric is dyed and the knots untied, the previously knotted areas will transform into tiny dots (Plate 24. Traditionally sungudi was used for cotton saris. Thousands of such dots decorate a sungudi sari; it contains 20,000 knots on average. Depending on the number of knots tied, a sungudi sari may take seven to fifteen days to make. According to the documents produced by the Gover

Sari

Mukulika Banerjee and Daniel Miller

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The Sari

Aarti Kawlra

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The word sari refers to the unstitched length of cloth that serves as the principal component of a clothing ensemble that most often includes a bodice and a petticoat. Known widely as the national dress of the Indian woman, the sari is a draped item of clothing whose contemporary sartorial expression has evolved over centuries of exchange between indigenous cultures and foreign influence. Historical records of the textile trade from India include mention of saris woven in special designs and tech

Bangladesh

Niaz Zaman

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Bordered to the south by the Bay of Bengal, to the west, north, and east by India, and to the southeast by Myanmar, Bangladesh became an independent country in 1971. The climate is tropical, with heavy seasonal rainfall for about four months of the year, high temperatures, and high humidity. Though temperatures fall in winter, necessitating the use of shawls and wraps, the prevailing warmth and humidity require clothes to be light and few. The indigenous dress of the lower Gangetic Delta was unst

Pragmatism and Enigmas: The “Panetar” and “Gharcholu” Saris in Gujarati Weddings

Donald Clay Johnson

Source: Wedding Dress Across Cultures, 2003, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

In its evolution over the last century the panetar demonstrates the practicality of a merchant community well used to evaluating costs and uses of merchandise. Although now always white with a red border, this is only the latest manifestation of the panetar as a sari type that carries great ritual significance. Reflecting Gujarati culture and taste, the panetar sari traditionally has had a plain white body and a tie-dye border as well as one or three tie-dye medallions portraying dancing women in

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