Results: Text (25) Images (0)

Filtered by:

Clear filters
Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 25 of 25 (1 pages)
    Page 1 of 1
The United States

Brenda Sternquist and Elizabeth B. Goldsmith

Source: International Retailing, 3rd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

After studying this chapter, you should be able to:

Brand Identity and Protection

Fiona Armstrong-Gibbs and Tamsin McLaren

Source: Marketing Fashion Footwear. The Business of Shoes, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Fashion footwear is a complex industry where many variables converge to present brands with challenges that test their ability to become, and remain, credible. It is this credibility that is crucial for brands to survive, not just short term, but long term. And it is this credibility, in the eyes of the consumer, that allows brands to charge far in excess of production costs and overheads, and therefore yield greater profit.

Brand Management

Fiona Armstrong-Gibbs and Tamsin McLaren

Source: Marketing Fashion Footwear. The Business of Shoes, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Successful fashion footwear brands are not born overnight but rather evolve over time as a result of unique product, in-depth consumer research, carefully planned strategies and in many cases by capturing the spirit of the time, often by chance. This chapter explores how brands morph from “fad” brands into truly iconic brands by appealing to many different consumer types simultaneously.

Branding and Logos

Jennifer Grayer Moore

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Making the brand name or logo of a company a visible and often dominant design feature in a piece of apparel or on an accessory became a defining feature in fashion in the latter part of the twentieth century, especially from 1970 onward. Icons, initials, full names of designers or design houses, and often a combination of two of the aforementioned were woven, printed, embroidered, stamped, and engraved into every conceivable type of material, sometimes as a single motif and often in endless repe

Céline

Laura Snelgrove

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Ralph Lauren

Daphne Stylianou

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Fashion Licensing

Karen Artz Ash and Barbara Kolsun

Source: Fashion Law. A Guide for Designers, Fashion Executives, and Attorneys, 2nd Edition, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

This chapter presents an overview of brand licensing and identifies the various issues that arise from these contractual arrangements in the fashion industry. License agreements are absolutely vital to the fashion industry, and it is no exaggeration to state that global fashion is built substantially on a foundation of brand licenses. As we will see, license agreements must be living instruments. As a result, the best ones are carefully designed to govern how people and companies work together ov

Litigation Strategies in Fashion Law

David H. Bernstein

Source: Fashion Law. A Guide for Designers, Fashion Executives, and Attorneys, 2nd Edition, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

This chapter reviews the full range of strategies and techniques available to fashion companies involved in legal conflicts, particularly regarding intellectual property. Among the topics discussed are how to choose a litigation forum, how to prosecute and defend against common claims that arise in fashion disputes, and how to address evidentiary issues that commonly arise during fashion-related litigation.This chapter was authored by David H. Bernstein of Debevoise & Plimpton LLP, in New York. M

International Fashion Law: Brand Protection and IP Law in Key Fashion Markets

Connie Carnabuci and Victoria White

Source: Fashion Law. A Guide for Designers, Fashion Executives, and Attorneys, 2nd Edition, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A fashion label must adopt a global brand protection strategy if it anticipates operating in foreign markets. In this chapter we explore international IP registration strategies with a view to maximizing the country-specific advantages of the different national systems. We conclude the chapter with a summary of key IP and brand protection rules and procedures in several of the world’s leading fashion markets. Applications for trademark registration should be initiated at the earliest opportunity

Copyright

Charles Colman

Source: Fashion Law. A Guide for Designers, Fashion Executives, and Attorneys, 2nd Edition, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

This chapter explores copyright law in fashion. We review the basic principles of U.S. copyright law, discuss difficulties that fashion designers encounter in attempting to protect their creations using copyright law, review categories of fashion design elements that are copyrightable, and note certain fashion-specific issues that frequently arise in copyright litigation.

International Development of the Fashion Business

Michael F. Colosi

Source: Fashion Law. A Guide for Designers, Fashion Executives, and Attorneys, 2nd Edition, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Expansion beyond domestic boundaries presents a fashion company with great financial opportunities and also enormous risk. The international appetite for high-quality branded apparel and luxury items has at times seemed almost insatiable. In addition, developing a strong international business can be a valuable hedge against domestic economic downturns and changing fashion trends. Foreign expansion also allows fashion companies to enter markets that have yet to experience the market saturation an

Import and Customs Issues in Fashion

Frances P. Hadfield and Amanda M. Simpson

Source: Fashion Law. A Guide for Designers, Fashion Executives, and Attorneys, 2nd Edition, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The majority of apparel goods sold in the United States today are manufactured abroad. By law, even before the apparel arrives at the U.S. border, the importer must provide formalized information to the U.S. government about the fashion articles it intends to import. The process of providing this information to the U.S. government is called entry.19 U.S.C. § 1484 (2013).

A Survey of Fashion Law: Key Issues and Trends

Guillermo C. Jimenez

Source: Fashion Law. A Guide for Designers, Fashion Executives, and Attorneys, 2nd Edition, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

When the first edition of this book was published in 2010, it was the first comprehensive guide to fashion law in the United States. Since then, fashion law has achieved widespread recognition as an emerging legal discipline. Law schools and fashion programs now teach regular courses in fashion law, bar association committees have been devoted to fashion law, and continuing legal education seminars (CLE) on fashion law are widely offered. In light of the first edition’s enthusiastic reception and

Counterfeiting

Barbara Kolsun and Heather J. McDonald

Source: Fashion Law. A Guide for Designers, Fashion Executives, and Attorneys, 2nd Edition, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Trademarks stimulate global consumer demand for products by increasing the recognition and popularity of certain providers of goods and services.Curtis Krechevsky, INTA and the Battle Against Counterfeiting, 93 Trademark Rep. 145 (2003). Trademarks create an association between a product or service and a particular brand’s name and reputation for quality. Since consumers cannot always inspect the quality of every product they buy or service they use, trademarks provide them with an easy and depen

Trademarks and Trade Dress

Marc Misthal

Source: Fashion Law. A Guide for Designers, Fashion Executives, and Attorneys, 2nd Edition, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

This section introduces the various types of IP rights that apply to fashion. The first key concept to understanding IP as it relates to fashion is that of multiple protection: a single garment or product may be covered by several different forms of legal protection at the same time. Consider a dress with a screen print of a photograph, as well as the company logo, on the front and a brand name on its label. The logo and brand name are protected as trademarks, but the photographic image is protec

Building on the Portfolio Project

Joanne Ciresi Barrett

Source: Designing Your Fashion Portfolio. From Concept to Presentation, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The completed Portfolio Project from Chapter 6 is fully rendered. You’ve told a complete collection story you’ve perceived to be an accurate realization of your idealized portfolio goals and completed most of the layout and page order of your collection.

The Brand

Kaled K. Hameide

Source: Fashion Branding. Unraveled, 2011, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Today, the term brand is one of the most utilized and referenced terms in marketing and business literature. Yet if you ask any number of people to define the term, you will most likely get as many different definitions. This is mainly because professionals usually approach the term from different perspectives, depending on where they stand on the marketing spectrum. For instance, a brand may be defined as a registered trademark from a legal perspective and an asset from a financial one. Another

The Branding Process Phase One: The Brand Decision and Positioning

Kaled K. Hameide

Source: Fashion Branding. Unraveled, 2011, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

We can start by defining branding as follows:

Luxury Fashion Brands

Kaled K. Hameide

Source: Fashion Branding. Unraveled, 2011, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The term LUXURY is actually a relative one. What may be luxury to one person or one culture may not be so to another, and what used to be luxury in the past may not be so in the future— in fact, it may even be considered standard. Nevertheless, we all seem to share some common understanding of what luxury ought to be. Just mention the word “luxury” and a mental image is automatically triggered. A few descriptions pop into most people’s minds, such as expensive, creative, trendy, exclusive, high q

Conventional Work Dress

Colleen Gau

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Historically, climate and work environments are primary to the selection and production of work clothing, but safety concerns, economic and business climates, fashion, and ethics find a place in the clothing narrative of Western civilizations. As crops and animals were domesticated, empires emerged in the Nile and Mediterranean regions, and the classification of skill groups became more distinct. Animal skins were replaced by woven garments by the time people had settled into communities. Herding

Logos

Jane Pavitt

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Brands and Labels

Jane M. Pavitt

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Who Owns Genuine Ugg/UGG® Boots in the Global Footwear Marketplace?

Rachel Matthews

Source: Bloomsbury Fashion Business Cases

Level: Intermediate

Business case

There is an ongoing legal dispute surrounding the use of “ugg,” “Ugg,” and “UGG®,” all terms used to describe a form of flat-soled slip-on sheepskin boot. The case raises a number of points of contention concerning intellectual property (IP) in the global fashion marketplace. This case study uses published material to examine differing applications of the term “ugg”/“UGG®” and the issues this raises around IP protection. Ugg boots have their origins in Australia, produced as a by-product of the w

Modern Luxury

Zabrena Lopez , Michael B. Beverland

Source: Bloomsbury Fashion Business Cases

Level: Intermediate

Business case

Gucci is an iconic Italian luxury brand renowned for their leather goods and fashion clothing. After an extended period of tumultuous sales and decreasing brand equity due to poor creative direction, Gucci, under the reign of newly appointed creative director, Alessandro Michele, refreshed its brand and reestablished itself as the preeminent fashion-forward luxury brand. Prior to Michele’s appointment, Gucci suffered numerous challenges to its relevance. Aside from the decline in luxury goods at

Sub-Par Inventory

Antigone Kotsiopulos , Molly Eckman
Revised by: Nancy J. Rabolt , Judy K. Miler

Source: Bloomsbury Fashion Business Cases

Level: Intermediate

Business case

A golf pro, who has never worked retail, becomes a golf club manager responsible for the driving range, the greens, a restaurant, and a retail shop, along with the merchandising and buying. The pro knew a lot about golf equipment and men’s clothing, but did not know much about retail operations, and women’s clothing. After working a while in the pro shop, he learned enough to grow his sales and raise capital to expand his merchandise mix beyond the golf basics. However, he was frustrated because

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 25 of 25 (1 pages)
Page 1 of 1