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Home Front Clothing Initiatives

Geraldine Howell

Source: Wartime Fashion. From Haute Couture to Homemade, 1939–1945 2012

Book chapter

Rural Dress in Australia

Jennifer Craik

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

A distinctive Australian sense of dress for Europeans is often considered to be bush wear, that is, clothes that have become synonymous with rural life and the outback. The typical elements of this rural dress include moleskin trousers, elastic-sided boots, cotton or wool shirt, bush jacket (in denim, wool, or leather) or waterproof oilskin coat, and a wide-brimmed felt hat. These garments are typically worn by men, so particular traits of masculinity are woven into the image of Australian bush w

Women’s Invisible Labor in Dress Practices: Care

Leopoldina Fortunati

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Fashion consumption hides a great deal of invisible labor; changes in this labor have influenced and silently but effectively reoriented the fashion world. This invisible labor is the work done in everyday life to buy, clean, iron, and mend clothes. These supplementary but ongoing tasks keep clothes in good condition. To what extent is this labor still performed at a mass level? Who does it in the early twenty-first century? A survey carried out in Italy with a sample of four hundred respondents

Germany

Irene Guenther

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

German dress in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries was closely linked to French–German relations. Critics disapproved of affluent German women’s fondness for French styles. During the Napoleonic wars, German rural folk dress often featured prominently at national festivals, manifesting patriotism. Ironically, it was with the French occupation during this time that German fragmentation consolidated, bringing a sense of “Germanness.” Industrialization occurred rapidly in the German states. Afte

Care and Maintenance

Ingun Grimstad Klepp

Translated by Stig Erik Sørheim

Kjetil Enstad

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Care and maintenance are important for both durability and appearance of clothes. Historically, clothing and textiles have been among the most precious possessions of a household, and extensive repairs and careful maintenance were worthwhile. Many people owned only one set of clothes; in poor families, the mother stayed up past bedtime because repairs had to be made when the clothes had been taken off for the night. Even for better-off women, mending and patching were everyday tasks. They have be

United States World War II Clothing Restrictions

Jennifer M. Mower and Elaine L. Pedersen

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In April 1942, four months after the attack on Pearl Harbor, the War Production Board issued Limitation Order 85 in order to conserve fabric needed for the war effort. The purpose of the order was to ensure that no major style changes in women’s wear would occur during the war. However, consumer apparel continued to be marketed throughout the war, though often the marketing efforts were patriotic. For example, The New York Times, 19 August 1942, reported that New York fashion designer Jane Engel

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