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Dress and Fashion Exhibits

Jean L. Druesedow

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Examples of secular and ecclesiastical dress have been part of the founding collections of many of the world’s great museums. In the late sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries, in private “cabinets of curiosities” that were the forerunners of many museums as institutions, elements of dress were collected in part to represent the curious and strange, in part for the artistry of the textiles and ornamentation. A number of museums have been founded on the basis of private collections, and

Introduction: Dress and Fashion in the Context of the Museum

Amy de la Haye

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Until very recently many collections of dress and fashion were generically described as costume. With reference to fashion (the creative expression of designers that can form a trend) and style (the individual look styled by the wearer of fashionable clothes or to signal subcultural allegiances for instance), the Museum of Costume in Bath has been renamed the Fashion Museum. The collection at the Victoria and Albert Museum, formerly described as dress (which can be used as a verb or as a noun ref

Resources for the Study of European Dress and Fashion in New Zealand

Laura Jocic

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The historical factors of settler life inevitably influenced the reasons why clothing has been saved. Much emphasis was placed on fashionable, quality clothing of women, although there have been other kinds of dress acquired and ideas about collecting have changed substantially in the twenty-first century. Regional factors, the scattered location of museums and collections, their particularities of acquisition, and the limited state of research into the subject are discussed below. Little has bee

Evidence about Dress of Indigenous People: United States Territory

Jenna Tedrick Kuttruff

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

American archaeology focuses, as does archaeology in other parts of the world, on the study of the human past by excavating and analyzing the material remains and monuments of past cultures and the contexts in which they are found. Archaeological findings and interpretations can be combined with information found in historical accounts to enhance the study of dress of North American Indian peoples not only at the times of early European contact but also prehistorically. Archaeology has provided e

Resources: Collections of Colonial Dress and Fashion in Australia

Catherine Reade

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Colonial period in Australia began with the establishment of the penal colony of New South Wales in 1788 and ended with the federation of Australia’s six colonies in 1901. By this time the Australian population reached just over 3.7 million, although immigration and birth rates were in decline. During this period Australia attained many hallmarks of a modern society, including urban and regional centers with good shopping facilities, cultural and educational institutions, clothing manufacture

Museum Collections of Dress and Fashion

Eleanor Thompson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Dress has achieved a high profile in museums around the world. There are hundreds of collections of varying quantities cared for in museums of fashion, decorative art, history, natural science, and anthropology. They are curated within their own specialist departments or within larger ones of applied arts, ethnography, or social history. Collections of dress are assembled to reveal changes in design, manufacturing processes, and taste. They are used to record social and cultural customs and recon

Living National Treasures: Textile and Garment Artists

Yoshiko I. Wada

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The designation “Living National Treasure” is a Japanese expression of reverence for the highest level of a skill or technique in traditional arts and crafts, including traditional textiles and dress types. The system was initiated to preserve and continue important cultural properties and assets significant to Japan’s rich cultural heritage. The law designates a selected skill of an individual or group as an object for protection.

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