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History of Dress in the Southern Cone

Carol García, Eva Medalla, Laura Novik and Regina A. Root

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Dress in the Southern Cone region, which includes Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, and the southernmost regions of Brazil and Paraguay, has traditionally blended indigenous roots and foreign influences, both of which remain prevalent in today’s fashions. Several overlapping, significant historical tendencies in the region’s dress are discussed in order to elucidate the significance of these influences and fashion trends, especially Spanish and Portuguese colonial influences, the emergence of national c

Gaucho Dress

Moira F. Harris

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

The Spanish introduced the horse and horned cattle to the New World, and the first horsemen of North and South America were the indigenous residents of the Pampas and plains. Later, the emigrants who dealt with these animals, from the southern gaucho to the northern cowboy, came to symbolize the region by their lifestyle and their dress. The earliest gauchos dealt in contraband hides and tallow, and were considered as vagabonds. Then, in the nineteenth century, they became soldiers in the wars fo

Manos de Uruguay: A Cooperative Umbrella

Lynn A. Meisch

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Uruguay, a small country on the southeastern coast of South America, has a population of just under four million. Its temperate climate and relatively thin soil make it perfect for sheep and cattle ranching; its principal exports are dairy products, wool, beef, hides, and grain. Criolla sheep were introduced to Uruguay from Peru via Argentina in the early seventeenth century. These descended from the Merino sheep brought to Peru by the Spanish. Merino wool has a silky feel and helps eliminate scr

Visualizing Difference: The Rhetoric of Clothing in Colonial Spanish America

Mariselle Meléndez

Source: The Latin American Fashion Reader 2005

Book chapter

Walter Mignolo observes that the lack of writing along with the lack of clothing and cannibalism constituted three crucial elements often used in the construction of Amerindian images: “Not having it yet or having it in excess were two cognitive moves used by Europeans in constructing the identity of the self-same by constructing at the same time, the image of the other” (Mignolo 1992: 312). Written as well as visual texts usually contrasted the nakedness of the indigenous people with the presenc

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