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Lithuanian Urban Dress, 1940s to Twenty-First Century

Djurdja Bartlett

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In 1944, Soviet Russia annexed Lithuania, and it became one of the republics forming the Soviet Union. Lithuanian fashion establishments that existed from before the war were nationalized, and the new economic system of centralized production and distribution of clothes was introduced. Following the Soviet model, the Lithuanian central fashion house was established in Vilnius in 1954, in order to control the design and production of clothes. However, Lithuania, as well as Estonia and Latvia, had

Lithuania: Urban Dress

Taira Milušauskaité

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In the first half of the twentieth century, Lithuania experienced the same economic and social changes as other countries of Central and East Europe. Features of capitalism were strengthening and bourgeois society was developing, which influenced fashion dispersion. Light industry had developed in Vilnius, with the opening of sewing shops, studios, workshops, clothing shops, and beauty salons. Fashionable clothes became mass-produced and mass-consumed goods. Railways allowed the growth of import

Lithuania: Ethnic Dress

Ruta Saliklis

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Lithuania, situated in northeastern Europe on the Baltic Sea, was until the twentieth century a nation of people living off the land. Up until 1970, more than half of Lithuania’s population lived outside of major urban areas. The country is covered with deciduous and coniferous forests, glacial lakes, and rivers. Many of the forests have been cut down, but until the mid-twentieth century, people living outside of major cities were very isolated, causing them to develop regional linguistic dialect

The Dynamic Relationship Between Lithuanian National Costumes and Folk Dress

Ruta Saliklis

Source: Folk Dress in Europe and Anatolia. Beliefs about Protection and Fertility 1999

Book chapter

National costumes are a window into the cultural values of a given people at a given time, and are shaped and altered by the historic events of that time. The popularity of national costumes rises and falls in accordance with political events, socio-economic conditions, and the people’s self-image. There have been two high points in the waves of popularity of national costumes in recent Lithuanian history, each of which occurred immediately preceding a declaration of independence – first at the t

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