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Flügel, J. C.

Michael Carter

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Flügel makes little use of Freud’s ideas of clothing as either fetish objects or as sexual symbols in dreams. Central to his analysis of clothing is the sociopolitical interpretation he gives to Freud’s model of the human psyche. Freud argues for a three-part division of the mind into id, superego, and ego. The id is the dimension of primitive instinct and the ultimate propelling force of the organism. The superego is an equally primitive inhibitory mechanism that operates as a crude controller o

The Predominance of Male Homosociality

J. C. Flügel

Source: Classic and Modern Writings on Fashion 2nd Edition 2009

Book chapter

This fact (assuming it to be a fact) of the much more widespread occurrence and much greater cultural influence of associations between men as compared with those between women is obviously a matter of much interest both to the psychologist and the sociologist and we may well devote a little consideration here to its probable causes. These causes are themselves, in all likelihood, both psychological and sociological in nature. Dealing first with those in which the psychological influences appear

Fashion and the Self

Annette Lynch and Mitchell D. Strauss

Source: Changing Fashion. A Critical Introduction to Trend Analysis and Meaning 2007

Book chapter

‘All clothing is erotic.’

J.C. Flügel and the Nude Future

Michael Carter

Source: Fashion Classics from Carlyle to Barthes 2003

Book chapter

It seems that the two human needs – to disclose oneself and conceal oneself – would be combined in the female psyche in quite a different way than in the male.

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