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Kenzo Takada

Stephanie Edith Herold

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

1944–2011: Postwar Revivalism and Transorientalism

Adam Geczy

Source: Fashion and Orientalism. Dress, Textiles and Culture from the 17th to the 21st Century 2013

Book chapter

To call the toga or the mandarin’s gown ‘chic’ is to suggest a process of change which barely existed in ancient Rome or China; the clothes of the beefeater of the samurai are eminently respectable, precisely because they are not up to date; the tarboosh was never ‘all the go’ for it has never gone.

East Asian Fashion Designers in Local and International Markets

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Fashion is often equated with modern European high fashion, and since it is normally seen as a specifically Western development, its role in the creation of style by non-Western designers, especially by East Asian designers, used to be generally unrecognized and ignored. East Asians started to adopt a Western style of dress only recently. Western clothing and fashion appeared in Japan during the Meiji era (1868–1912), and it was a desired symbol of modernization encouraged by Emperor Meiji. Almos

Japanese Fashion*

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

During the Taisho period (1912–1926), wearing Western clothing continued to be a symbol of sophistication and an expression of modernity. It was in this period that working women such as bus conductors, nurses, and typists started wearing Western clothes in everyday life. By the beginning of the Showa period (1926–1989), men’s clothing had become largely Western, and by this time, the business suit was gradually becoming standard apparel for company employees. It took about a century for Western

Type 1: Kenzo Complete Assimilation into the French Fashion System

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: The Japanese Revolution in Paris Fashion. Dress, Body, Culture 2004

Book chapter

One could say that Kenzo accidentally stumbled into the French fashion system while selling his designs to stores in Paris. He began to step inside the system, and his interaction with insiders began. Kenzo would probably like to say that this was his fate. Without any knowledge of the existing fashion system at the time, he was introduced to fashion professionals in the system one after another, which led to meeting others who had the influence to legitimate him. He explains (in Tajima 1996: 378

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