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Performance Dress in China and Taiwan

Alexandra B. Bonds, Dongshin Chang and Elizabeth Johnson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Over three hundred forms of indigenous theater entertainment incorporating song and music have evolved in China, with different forms of music-dramas being performed in specific regions throughout the country. Among these forms, Kunqu (songs of Kunshan) took shape in the Lower Yangtze region of China in the mid-sixteenth century, attained national popularity in the following two centuries, and is still thriving in the early twenty-first century. Jingju (capital drama), commonly known in the West

Manchu National Minority

Pamela Kyle Crossley

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Manchus are descended from the group of Arctic peoples in northeastern Asia that included the ancestors of the modern Ewenki, Oroqens, Hezhen, and closely related peoples of China and Russia. They were speakers of Tungusic languages (the extreme eastern branch of the hypothesized Altaic language family) and for most of their history were hunting and gathering peoples. In the 2003 census, Manchus numbered 6.9 million, or about 5 percent of the total population of China. Nearly all Manchus live

Early Evidence of Fashion in West Europe

Sarah-Grace Heller

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

For the Roman period, relatively rich quantities of textual and visual sources (notably sculpture and mosaics) survive; actual items of apparel are extremely rare, as is the case for most areas up through the Middle Ages. Rome had urban populations, skilled artisans, trading networks, and an active culture of social criticism and satire that often used the lexicon of adornment to evaluate merit, reputation, and the erotic. Roman status was defined visually. More problematic for fashion is the rat

Al-Washsha, a Medieval Fashion Guru

Gillian Vogelsang-Eastwood

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The early medieval period in Southwest Asia was a time of change, with an increase in wealth and trade, especially via Central Asia with China, along the so-called Silk Road. In addition there was political and social stability following the establishment of the Abbasid dynasty in 749 c.e. The Abbasid caliphate flourished for two centuries before going into decline and was one of the great Muslim caliphates of the Arab Empire, known for its arts, literature, and architectural achievements, and al

Clothing Provision and the Great Wardrobe in the Mid-Thirteenth Century

Kay Staniland

Source: Classic and Modern Writings on Fashion 2nd Edition 2009

Book chapter

The King sends to the fair of St. Ives William the Tailor and John le Fleming to purchase for the King's use

The Florentine ‘Rigattieri’: Second Hand Clothing Dealers and the Circulation of Goods in the Renaissance

Carole Collier Frick

Source: Old Clothes, New Looks. Second Hand Fashion 2005

Book chapter

In the economy of Renaissance Florence, the textile and garment industry dominated the urban marketplace for consumer goods. In addition to the 909 household heads Franceschi found who listed some aspect of the woolen cloth business as their occupation at the turn of the fifteenth century, Herlihy and Klapisch-Zuber counted 866 clothiers in 1427 that identified themselves by some aspect of the clothing trade within the city.For the wool-workers see (Franceschi, 1993: tab. 20: 143). For other clot

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