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Tweed, Femininity, and Fashion, 1851–1918

Fiona Anderson

Source: Tweed, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Prior to the early 1850s, Scottish woolen manufacturers predominantly catered to the ladies’ trade through the weaving of shawls and fine, merino dress fabrics that were known as ““cloakings”cloakings,” as noted in Chapter 3. In 1863, Locke, JamesJames Locke described recent changes in the Scottish woolen industryScottish woolen industry, by stating: The Scotch tweed trade then may be divided into three distinct sections- viz. tweeds, shawlsshawls, and cloakings. The last of these came to their c

Sportswear Chic: Tweed in Womenswear, 1919–1952

Fiona Anderson

Source: Tweed, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Detailed statistics about the proportion of British tweeds, which were consumed by women, or made specifically for the female market between 1919 and 1952 are not available. However, estimates from key Scottish woolen industry bodies and a government study give a useful indication about the picture within Scotland up to 1946. The visit of the Scottish Woollen Trade Mark Association (SWTA)Scottish Woollen Trade Mark Association to the USA and Canada toward the end of 1921 prompted an article in Ga

Design Research and Inspiration

John Hopkins

Source: Menswear, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

You can say that designing is quite easy; the difficulty lies in finding a new way to explore beauty.

Fashion Apparel Women’s, Men’s, Children’s, and Teen’s

Elaine Stone and Sheryl A. Farnan

Source: In Fashion, 3rd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Of necessity, the women’s, men’s, children’s, and teens’ fashion industry exists in a constant state of change, reacting on an ongoing basis to the consumer’s tastes and styles, to an increasingly global economy, and to new technology. It is an industry that truly thrives on change and novelty.

Dressing up, dressing down: A spectacle of otherness, and the ordinariness of the civilian alter-ego

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

™ and © DC Comics

The Northern Renaissance

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By the beginning of the 16th century, northern Europe had experienced a gradual transition to participation in the new spirit of the Renaissance. Along with changes in arts and letters came profound changes in religious attitudes, which led some Christians to separate from the Roman Catholic Church. The Protestant Reformation, which began in the German states of the Holy Roman Empire, split Europe into two hostile religious camps.

The Seventeenth Century 1600–1700

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Dress is often used to communicate social status in both obvious and subtle ways. In a society in which social classes are well defined, customs relating to dress are frequently a visible symbol of one’s rank.

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