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Pockets, Openings and Finishes

Pat Parish

Source: Pattern Cutting. The Architecture of Fashion, 2nd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The way a garment is finished is determined by price, fabric and design, so, for example, if a facing was used, it would give a crisp clean finish without the need for topstitching, but a design in fabric, such as fine silk, chiffon or cotton, may be better finished with a bias fabric binding.

Pattern Cutting

Anette Fischer and Kiran Gobin

Source: Construction for Fashion Design, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

This is the point at which pattern cutting becomes much more creative and exciting. Once the design has been completed, the process of breathing life into a flat design drawing in order to achieve an actual garment can begin. To be able to achieve a beautiful garment shape takes time and experience. Remember, nothing ever happens without practicing your skills—don’t be disheartened if it doesn’t work first time round. All outstanding fashion designers and creative pattern cutters have worked for

Pants

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The origin of women wearing pants is not known, but as far back as the first century c.e., women from the Middle East and Asia were wearing some form of pants. In a more modern time, Amelia Bloomer, attempting to banish the corset in the mid-1850s, helped to conceive an outfit consisting of a short skirt that was worn over full trousers that were gathered at the ankles. These trousers were called “bloomers” after her. The bloomer costume had a rather short life, but helped to introduce the concep

Tailored Clothing

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

1 First, block off the structure on an underdrawing.

Skirts and Pants

Sharon Czachor

Source: Sewing with Knits and Stretch Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The following techniques are stitched in both skirts and pants and are organized for sample making and application to garments that follow these directions. Stitching directions for the knit skirt, pants, and stretch woven fabric are included under each category.

Jackets

Sharon Czachor

Source: Sewing with Knits and Stretch Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

A stabilizer is anything that can be used to add structure, shape, and reinforcement to the garment. Stabilizers such as underlining, interfacing, stabilizing tapes, and sometimes staystitching (as was used in the V-neckline) will effectively support the garment. Before stitching any seams, it’s important to choose the correct type, weight, color, and texture of stabilizer. The weight and type of stabilizer must work in conjunction with the weight of the fabric. A stabilizer can be applied to the

The Skill of Basic Tailoring

Zoya Nudelman

Source: The Art of Couture Sewing, 2nd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Tailoring has been around for hundreds of years, having begun during the Middle Ages. Tailoring has always been referred to as suit construction; however, when we refer to couture tailoring, we can also discuss tailoring techniques that are used in couture garments. These techniques include pockets, collars, sleeves, and cuffs. For example, a simple patch pocket can be designed to fit a couture gown, yet you can concentrate on careful tailoring of the pockets. Tailoring steps have also been used

Pockets

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: A Guide to Fashion Sewing, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By studying the information in this chapter, the designer will be able to:

Kosuke Tsumura

Alessandro Esculapio

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Plackets and Pockets

Myoungok Kim and Injoo Kim

Source: Patternmaking for Menswear. Classic to Contemporary, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A placket is an opening that enables the wearer to put on and take off garments. They are most common on the upper part of pants, and the necks and sleeves of shirts and casual jackets. Even though the primary purpose of plackets is to allow clothing to be put on or removed easily, sometimes they are used as a design element. Plackets often contain added facings, attached bands to surround and reinforce fasteners such as zippers, snaps, and buttons, and are often found on the double layers of fab

Technical Design Terms for Silhouettes and Design Details

Jaeil Lee and Camille Steen

Source: Technical Sourcebook for Designers, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

Fabrics and Cutting

Jaeil Lee and Camille Steen

Source: Technical Sourcebook for Designers, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

Construction-Related Design Details

Jaeil Lee and Camille Steen

Source: Technical Sourcebook for Designers, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

Technical Design with Illustrator®

Stacy Stewart Smith

Source: CAD for Fashion Design and Merchandising, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In the apparel market, nearly all digital production flats are created with vector-based software programs like Illustrator®. The need to communicate with global resources and the fast pace of the garment center have nearly eclipsed the use of freehand technical flats for production.

Details and Trim

Evelyn L. Brannon

Source: Designer’s Guide to Fashion Apparel, 2011, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

“I embellish everything I touch.”

Assembly and Finishing

Paula J. Myers-McDevitt

Source: Apparel Production Management and the Technical Package, 2011, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Most people who sew at home know garment components as the trims: zippers, buttons, and so on. If you were to look at retail patterns for home sewing, you would see these items listed as components. However, in manufacturing, all parts of the garment are considered components—there is no distinction between body components and trim components. Later, when you learn about the technical package, there will be a fabric sheet and a component/trim sheet (which can be confusing), but on the sewing floo

The Trousers

Milva Fiorella Di Lorenzo

Source: Tailoring Techniques for Fashion, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

After you have read this chapter, you should be able to discuss:

Design Details

Milva Fiorella Di Lorenzo

Source: Tailoring Techniques for Fashion, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

After you have read this chapter, you should be able to discuss:

Pants and Pockets

Nora M. MacDonald

Source: Principles of Flat-Pattern Design, 4th Edition, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Pantsare garments that encircle the hips and each leg; they extend from the waist or below to the ankle or below. They may be different lengths, body-hugging or loose, with flared, tubular, or tapered legs (Fig. 13.1). Fashion dictates the specific silhouette and details popular at a given time. Principles applied to the basic dress sloper may be applied to pant designs, including those related to darts, gathers, pleats, yokes, style lines, and so on.

Tailored Clothing

Michael P. Londrigan

Source: Menswear. Business to Style, 2009, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Noted author Mark Twain once said that “clothes make the man.” Truer words have never been spoken, especially when it comes to a man’s suit. Historically, the suit comprised three pieces: jacket, pant, and vest. This is termed a nested suit. All the pieces match and are sold on the same hanger. In today’s society, the vest has been reduced in importance and is subject to the whims of designers, who try to resurrect it as a fashion statement from time to time. Currently, vests are found more in th

Pockets and Tabs

Laura Nugent

Source: Computerized Patternmaking for Apparel Production, 2008, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The jacket pocket has rounded corners at the bottom. In order to get the curve on the corners the same on both sides, you start by making half of a pattern, then mirroring it. You draw the pocket horizontally because that is the direction in which it will be finalized for production, and the grainline will be correct for the marker.

Cargo Pant

Laura Nugent

Source: Computerized Patternmaking for Apparel Production, 2008, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Create two draft lines for the contour waistband on both front and back pant. The CF waistline will be dropped 1.5 inches, but the CB waistline will be dropped only .5 inch. The waistline at the side seam will be dropped 1 inch. Draft the second line to be the width of the waistband, which is 2 inches. The making of the back waistband has different steps from the front because we need to keep the back darts for fit.

Alterations II

Laura Nugent

Source: Computerized Patternmaking for Apparel Production, 2008, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

See original and revision sketches in Figure 15.4. The pattern modification requested is to make a tailored sailor skirt using the fit and seam proportions of the eight-gore skirt, 8GSKT, from Lesson 13. This requires removing the flare and ruffled petticoat and adding a high midriff waistband with button trim and inserting an on-seam pocket.

Clip Art Library

Michele Wesen Bryant and Diane DeMers

Source: The Spec Manual, 2nd Edition, 2006, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Jackets and Coats

Lori A. Knowles

Source: The Practical Guide to Patternmaking for Fashion Designers Menswear, 2005, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Although the jackets and coats introduced in this chapter vary, some classic styles are also introduced in this chapter. Jackets are often the focal point of an ensemble and are both fashionable and functional. Jackets are worn over shirts, sweaters, or vests, so extra ease is included in the jacket sloper. Jackets are often made with several layers of fabric to give them shape and stability, which requires more ease. The difference between jackets and coats can be difficult to determine. Suit ja

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