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Yarn Basics

Lisa Donofrio-Ferrezza and Marilyn Hefferen

Source: Designing a Knitwear Collection. From Inspiration to Finished Garments, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Yarns are the basic materials of the knitting process. Yarns are made from fibers, which are either staple or filament. Staple fibers are naturally short or cut filament fibers that are spun together to create yarn. Filament fibers are continuous in length. Many types of yarns are available, from natural in raw or regenerated form to manufactured synthetics to blends, making the assortment tremendous. Further improvements in technology and in the manufacturing and processing of fibers have made y

Fabrication

Sandra Keiser, Deborah Vandermar and Myrna B. Garner

Source: Beyond Design. The Synergy of Apparel Product Development, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

“Every time that I wanted to give up, if I saw an interesting textile, print, whatever, suddenly I would see a collection.”

Fabrics and techniques

Richard Sorger and Jenny Udale

Source: The Fundamentals of Fashion Design, 3rd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

It is of fundamental importance for every designer to understand the unique properties and qualities of fabrics. Choosing the right fabric for a garment is crucial to its success.

Preparing Knits and Stretch Wovens for Stitching

Sharon Czachor

Source: Sewing with Knits and Stretch Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Whether the chosen fabric is a knit or a stretch woven, it’s important to identify the right side and wrong side of the fabric (Figure 4.1a and b). The wrong side of the fabric is where the markings are placed, where interfacing or stabilizers of any kind are placed, and where the construction stitches are sewn. Because of the diversity of fibers used in creating knit fabrics and stretch woven fabrics, the fibers react differently to marking pens, pencils, chalk, or wax marking utensils, even us

Textile Finishes (Swatches 89–98)

Ingrid Johnson, Ajoy K. Sarkar and Allen C. Cohen

Source: J. J.Pizzuto’s Fabric Science. Swatch Kit, 11th Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Fabric Sample Sheet

Ingrid Johnson, Ajoy K. Sarkar and Allen C. Cohen

Source: J. J.Pizzuto’s Fabric Science. Swatch Kit, 11th Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Fabric Science

Ingrid Johnson, Ajoy K. Sarkar and Allen C. Cohen

Source: J. J.Pizzuto’s Fabric Science. Swatch Kit, 11th Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Textile Forecasting

Evelyn L. Brannon and Lorynn Divita

Source: Fashion Forecasting, 4th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Many a dress of mine is born of the fabric alone.

Textile Design and Development

Michele M. Granger

Source: The Fashion Industry and Its Careers: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A fashion director for a textile company is responsible for determining the trends, colors, themes, and textures for piece goods, or fabrics, that the firm will feature for a specific season. Fashion directors are primarily interested in identifying the most important fashion trends for their companies and communicating these trends to textile designers, production managers, and customers. Fashion directors often work with trend forecasting firms to determine trend possibilities in color, form, t

Junya Watanabe

Stephanie Edith Herold

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Textiles for Interiors

Ingrid Johnson, Allen C. Cohen and Ajoy K. Sarkar

Source: J.J. Pizzuto’s Fabric Science, 11th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Some textile materials are used in interior environments such as homes, offices, hospitals, hotels, schools, airplanes, and automobile interiors. These textiles are generally referred to as interior textiles but may also be called home textiles.

Guide to Fabric Selection

Ingrid Johnson, Allen C. Cohen and Ajoy K. Sarkar

Source: J.J. Pizzuto’s Fabric Science, 11th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In the previous chapters, each component link in the textile chain (fibers, yarns, fabric constructions, dyeing, printing, and quality assurance) was discussed and explored separately. Each chapter dealt with the way these components may affect the appearance and performance properties of the final finished textile fabric. When these various components come together as a finalized textile, however, each component tends to affect the others, usually reinforcing each, but sometimes with an adverse

Textile Laws, Regulations, and Trade Agreements

Ingrid Johnson, Allen C. Cohen and Ajoy K. Sarkar

Source: J.J. Pizzuto’s Fabric Science, 11th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The production of fiber through the manufacturing of consumer end products in the textile industry is complex, with the content of the material often determining end use. Because of this complexity and the need to provide standardized information to end users, governments have adopted rules and regulations which require manufacturers to provide certain standardized information about their product. This chapter will address the major laws affecting textiles manufactured or sold in the United State

The Textile Industry

Ingrid Johnson, Allen C. Cohen and Ajoy K. Sarkar

Source: J.J. Pizzuto’s Fabric Science, 11th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The basic needs of people are food, clothing, and shelter. The textile industry is intertwined with all three of these essential sectors of our lives. Fabrics are used in the food industry to provide plant covers, absorbent liners in prepackaged meats, and reusable cloth bags. The use of fabrics in clothing is well known for its warmth, protection, and aesthetic properties. Fabrics also provide for shelter in the form of tents, building materials, and awnings. Most people don’t realize how much f

Textile Finishing

Ingrid Johnson, Allen C. Cohen and Ajoy K. Sarkar

Source: J.J. Pizzuto’s Fabric Science, 11th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

A marketable textile fabric is not completed after fabric formation, dyeing, or printing. Fabrics usually still need to undergo an additional processing known as finishing, which is the final processing before the fabric is cut into apparel or made into articles such as towels, curtains, or draperies. Finishing is what makes fabrics more suitable for their intended end use. Final inspection to ascertain fabric quality is performed at the completion of finishing. There are many types of finishes:

AllSaints

Sandra J. Ley

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Burberry

Emily M. Orr

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Providing Mobility in Clothing

Susan M. Watkins and Lucy E. Dunne

Source: Functional Clothing Design. From Sportswear to Spacesuits, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Since clothing is intended to be a second skin, there is no better way to begin a study of mobility needs in clothing than by looking at the mobility of the body itself. Put most simply, movement is the result of the following chain of events: (1) the brain sends signals to the appropriate nerve fibers or motor neurons; (2) they in turn send out impulses, via nerve fibers, which extend from the spinal cord to muscle fibers all over the body; (3) these impulses stimulate the appropriate muscle fib

Materials

Susan M. Watkins and Lucy E. Dunne

Source: Functional Clothing Design. From Sportswear to Spacesuits, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A textile is defined as “any flexible material that is composed of thin films of polymers or of fibers, yarns, or fabrics or products made of films, fibers, yarns, or fabrics.” (Kadolph 2010, 6) The flexible nature of textiles is of great importance to apparel, which needs to move with the human body. Protective clothing systems are often based on textiles and augmented with other types of materials like foams and rigid materials.

Thermal Protection

Susan M. Watkins and Lucy E. Dunne

Source: Functional Clothing Design. From Sportswear to Spacesuits, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The human body adjusts to temperature changes by producing or releasing heat in specific ways. Heat can also be transferred from the environment to the body by various means. To see how body processes of heat production and dissipation are called into play, it is important to understand the basic ways in which heat can be transferred from one object to another.

Impact Protection

Susan M. Watkins and Lucy E. Dunne

Source: Functional Clothing Design. From Sportswear to Spacesuits, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Dictionary definitions of impact use the phrases, “a striking together” or “violent contact.” The word collision is often used as a synonym. These definitions refer to only one type of impact—one due to compressive forces. Actually, three actions result from the application of forces on impact: tension, shear, and compression. Each application of force places different stresses on an object. Figure 6.2 shows what happens when force is applied to the opposite ends of a body made of a pliable mater

Living and Working in Hazardous Environments

Susan M. Watkins and Lucy E. Dunne

Source: Functional Clothing Design. From Sportswear to Spacesuits, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Four significant types of environmental threats from which individuals in a variety of work and life situations need to be protected are chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear hazards, generally referred to as CBRN. While these hazards can occur in any of the three states of matter (solid, liquid, or gas), some of the most hazardous to humans often occur in a combination of those states as aerosols. Aerosols are tiny particles of solids or liquids suspended in a gas. They include dusts,

Safety Regulations and Guidelines for Wearing Apparel

Janace E. Bubonia

Source: Apparel Quality. A Guide To Evaluating Sewn Products, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Toxicity is a safety hazard resulting from wearing some apparel products. Materials containing certain types of dyes, finishes, containments, or metals that come in contact with the wearer’s skin can cause mild to severe allergic reactions or dermatitis for those individuals with skin sensitivity and worse some substances have been found to be carcinogenic. Chemical substances are identified by CAS (Chemical Abstract Service) numbers, which are registration designations assigned to individual che

Materials

Erin Cadigan

Source: Sourcing and Selecting Textiles for Fashion, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Design is a plan for arranging elements in such a way as best to accomplish a particular purpose

Fabrics and Cutting

Jaeil Lee and Camille Steen

Source: Technical Sourcebook for Designers, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

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