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Flammability testing and issues specific to children’s products

Deanna Clark-Esposito

Source: A Practical Guide to Fashion Law and Compliance, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The law as a means to prevent flammable wearing apparel dates back to 1953 when the Flammable Fabrics ActFlammable Fabrics Act (FFA) was enacted. This law, together with its rules and regulations, provides the framework within which this prevention effort continues today and is commonly referred to as the Flammability Standard, theFlammability Standard.See, Standard for the Flammability of Textiles (16 CFR Part 1610). Its purpose is twofold. The first is to prevent individuals from wearing clothi

Textiles, trims, findings, and materials

Chelsea Rousso and Nancy Kaplan Ostroff

Source: Fashion Forward. A Guide to Fashion Forecasting, 2nd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

trims forecastingtextiles forecastingmaterials forecastingfindings forecastingTextiles, trims, findings, and materials forecasting is a process of collecting, editing, interpreting, and analyzing information to be able to predict the textiles, materials, trims, and findings that will be popular in upcoming seasons. As in theme and color, forecasters research and use their creativity, instinct, and experience to sense tactile shifts. Consumers are greatly influenced by the feel of textilestextiles

Punk Style Past and Present

Monica Sklar

Source: Punk Style, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

leatherbeltshooded sweatshirt (hoodie)craftreconfiguredcolorblackapparelself-identified punkWhat is punk dress and how did it get that way? For some punk style is an obvious reference to green mohawkmohawk hair, a leather jacket, plaid plaidpantspants, and bootscombat bootscombat bootsboots. For others it is an oversized hooded sweatshirt and jeans, clean white shoes, and a wallet accessorychainchain. Some say it is a current caricaturecaricature logosof bandsof a dead movement while others say i

Minor Fabrications

Deborah E. Young

Source: Swatch Reference Guide for Fashion Fabrics, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The fabrics in this category are made without yarn. Without yarns, there is no organized structure or thread count. Because yarn construction is labor intensive, fabrics made without yarns offer significant cost savings over those made with yarns. Additionally, nonwoven fabrics are often softer and more elastic than their woven or even knitted counterparts. The fibers are blown onto a collection surface and held together by entanglement (or needlepunching), heat fusion (if thermoplastic), or adhe

Fabrics Defined by Finishes

Deborah E. Young

Source: Swatch Reference Guide for Fashion Fabrics, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

All fabrics get a general finish; in fact, most fabrics have undergone at least a dozen general finishes by the time they reach the hands of the consumer. General finishes include washing, ironing, singeing, or bleaching the fabric.

Swatch Boards

Deborah E. Young

Source: Swatch Reference Guide for Fashion Fabrics, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Yarn Basics

Lisa Donofrio-Ferrezza and Marilyn Hefferen

Source: Designing a Knitwear Collection. From Inspiration to Finished Garments, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Yarns are the basic materials of the knitting process. Yarns are made from fibers, which are either staple or filament. Staple fibers are naturally short or cut filament fibers that are spun together to create yarn. Filament fibers are continuous in length. Many types of yarns are available, from natural in raw or regenerated form to manufactured synthetics to blends, making the assortment tremendous. Further improvements in technology and in the manufacturing and processing of fibers have made y

Fabrication

Sandra Keiser, Deborah Vandermar and Myrna B. Garner

Source: Beyond Design. The Synergy of Apparel Product Development, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

“Every time that I wanted to give up, if I saw an interesting textile, print, whatever, suddenly I would see a collection.”

Fabrics and techniques

Richard Sorger and Jenny Udale

Source: The Fundamentals of Fashion Design, 3rd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

It is of fundamental importance for every designer to understand the unique properties and qualities of fabrics. Choosing the right fabric for a garment is crucial to its success.

Preparing Knits and Stretch Wovens for Stitching

Sharon Czachor

Source: Sewing with Knits and Stretch Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Whether the chosen fabric is a knit or a stretch woven, it’s important to identify the right side and wrong side of the fabric (Figure 4.1a and b). The wrong side of the fabric is where the markings are placed, where interfacing or stabilizers of any kind are placed, and where the construction stitches are sewn. Because of the diversity of fibers used in creating knit fabrics and stretch woven fabrics, the fibers react differently to marking pens, pencils, chalk, or wax marking utensils, even us

Textile Finishes (Swatches 89–98)

Ingrid Johnson, Ajoy K. Sarkar and Allen C. Cohen

Source: J. J.Pizzuto’s Fabric Science. Swatch Kit, 11th Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Fabric Sample Sheet

Ingrid Johnson, Ajoy K. Sarkar and Allen C. Cohen

Source: J. J.Pizzuto’s Fabric Science. Swatch Kit, 11th Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Fabric Science

Ingrid Johnson, Ajoy K. Sarkar and Allen C. Cohen

Source: J. J.Pizzuto’s Fabric Science. Swatch Kit, 11th Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Textile Forecasting

Evelyn L. Brannon and Lorynn Divita

Source: Fashion Forecasting, 4th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Many a dress of mine is born of the fabric alone.

Textile Design and Development

Michele M. Granger

Source: The Fashion Industry and Its Careers: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A fashion director for a textile company is responsible for determining the trends, colors, themes, and textures for piece goods, or fabrics, that the firm will feature for a specific season. Fashion directors are primarily interested in identifying the most important fashion trends for their companies and communicating these trends to textile designers, production managers, and customers. Fashion directors often work with trend forecasting firms to determine trend possibilities in color, form, t

Junya Watanabe

Stephanie Edith Herold

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

The Textile Industry

Ingrid Johnson, Allen C. Cohen and Ajoy K. Sarkar

Source: J.J. Pizzuto’s Fabric Science, 11th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The basic needs of people are food, clothing, and shelter. The textile industry is intertwined with all three of these essential sectors of our lives. Fabrics are used in the food industry to provide plant covers, absorbent liners in prepackaged meats, and reusable cloth bags. The use of fabrics in clothing is well known for its warmth, protection, and aesthetic properties. Fabrics also provide for shelter in the form of tents, building materials, and awnings. Most people don’t realize how much f

Textile Finishing

Ingrid Johnson, Allen C. Cohen and Ajoy K. Sarkar

Source: J.J. Pizzuto’s Fabric Science, 11th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

A marketable textile fabric is not completed after fabric formation, dyeing, or printing. Fabrics usually still need to undergo an additional processing known as finishing, which is the final processing before the fabric is cut into apparel or made into articles such as towels, curtains, or draperies. Finishing is what makes fabrics more suitable for their intended end use. Final inspection to ascertain fabric quality is performed at the completion of finishing. There are many types of finishes:

Textiles for Interiors

Ingrid Johnson, Allen C. Cohen and Ajoy K. Sarkar

Source: J.J. Pizzuto’s Fabric Science, 11th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Some textile materials are used in interior environments such as homes, offices, hospitals, hotels, schools, airplanes, and automobile interiors. These textiles are generally referred to as interior textiles but may also be called home textiles.

Guide to Fabric Selection

Ingrid Johnson, Allen C. Cohen and Ajoy K. Sarkar

Source: J.J. Pizzuto’s Fabric Science, 11th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In the previous chapters, each component link in the textile chain (fibers, yarns, fabric constructions, dyeing, printing, and quality assurance) was discussed and explored separately. Each chapter dealt with the way these components may affect the appearance and performance properties of the final finished textile fabric. When these various components come together as a finalized textile, however, each component tends to affect the others, usually reinforcing each, but sometimes with an adverse

Textile Laws, Regulations, and Trade Agreements

Ingrid Johnson, Allen C. Cohen and Ajoy K. Sarkar

Source: J.J. Pizzuto’s Fabric Science, 11th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The production of fiber through the manufacturing of consumer end products in the textile industry is complex, with the content of the material often determining end use. Because of this complexity and the need to provide standardized information to end users, governments have adopted rules and regulations which require manufacturers to provide certain standardized information about their product. This chapter will address the major laws affecting textiles manufactured or sold in the United State

AllSaints

Sandra J. Ley

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Burberry

Emily M. Orr

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Yohji Yamamoto, Fall/Winter 1992

Nadya Wang

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

By now, recruiting models from all walks of life had become Yamamoto’s modus operandi, and for his fall/winter 1992 collection there were “real” people of a variety of ages and nationalities. The show provided looks that appeared to be for the cold outdoors, echoed in the rough, wooden planks that made up the runway. Outfits were made in fabrics suitable for keeping warm in the colder months, and completed with bold accessories such as big boots, knitted hats, and even eyepatches.

Providing Mobility in Clothing

Susan M. Watkins and Lucy E. Dunne

Source: Functional Clothing Design. From Sportswear to Spacesuits, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Since clothing is intended to be a second skin, there is no better way to begin a study of mobility needs in clothing than by looking at the mobility of the body itself. Put most simply, movement is the result of the following chain of events: (1) the brain sends signals to the appropriate nerve fibers or motor neurons; (2) they in turn send out impulses, via nerve fibers, which extend from the spinal cord to muscle fibers all over the body; (3) these impulses stimulate the appropriate muscle fib

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