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Introduction: Anthropology, Street Style

Brent Luvaas

Source: Street Style. An Ethnography of Fashion Blogging, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

It was Monday, 26 March 2012, a windy and unseasonably cold afternoon in Center City, Philadelphia. I was standing on the corner of Walnut and 18th Street, a backpack swung over my shoulders, a Panasonic Lumix GF-1 micro-four thirds camera dangling from my neck. My head ached. My teeth were grinding with caffeine. And my eyes were dry and strained from overuse, darting continually back and forth, as I assessed the outfit of every person passing by. I remember being self-conscious about what I was

On ‘The Street’: A Conceptual History of Street Style Photography

Brent Luvaas

Source: Street Style. An Ethnography of Fashion Blogging, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

‘On street style photographydescription ofthe Street’ is the title of photographer Bill Cunningham, BillCunningham’s long-running weekly column (and now web video series) in the Sunday style section of the New York Times. It was also the title of Amy Arbus’ photo column in the Village Voice throughout the 1980s and 1990s. Midway through the first decade of the new millennium, Scott Schuman began using it as a heading for his posts on The Sartorialist, TheSartorialist website, followed by a ‘…’, t

Travelling the Street Style Blogosphere: Amateur Anthropology from Around the Globe

Brent Luvaas

Source: Street Style. An Ethnography of Fashion Blogging, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

‘People urban cosmopolitanism of Helsinki (Finland)Karjalainen, SampoHel Looks (blog)Helsinki (Finland)urban cosmopolitanism ofHelsinki (Finland)punk rocker culture inHelsinki (Finland)watching has always been my obsession and my hobby’, Liisa Jokinen told me, as we chatted in June of 2012 via the voice-over-internet protocol of Skype. ‘I’ve always been interested in peoples’ clothes, why [they] wear certain things, and the reason behind their outfits, what kinds of stories [go into them]. So it

Style Radar: On Becoming A Street Style Blogger and Knowing Whom to Shoot

Brent Luvaas

Source: Street Style. An Ethnography of Fashion Blogging, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Let’s go back to that day in late March of 2012, where we started this book, my first time out ‘on the street’ as a street style blogger. I had brought my camera and a stack of photo release forms, a notebook for jotting down thoughts, and an iPhone for posting Twitter updates to a non-existent set of followers. I was anxious and over-caffeinated, with little idea of where to go and even less of what to do when I got there. So I went to the first location that popped into my head, South Street. S

The Subject(s) of Street Style: Street Portraits as Fashion Singularities

Brent Luvaas

Source: Street Style. An Ethnography of Fashion Blogging, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

What does street Philadelphiastylestyle photography ‘reveal’ about its subjects? What does it show us about who they are, where they are from, and the times they are living in? What hidden meanings does it unearth from the clothes they wear and the styles they embody? What kinds of anthropological knowledge, in other words, can we glean from a street style photograph? If the realism of street style photography is largely performative, a construct of the conventions photographers employ (see Chapt

Conclusion: Straight Up, Redux

Brent Luvaas

Source: Street Style. An Ethnography of Fashion Blogging, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

In October 2012, after six years of posting his photographs online, Gunnar Hämmerle, the veteran street style blogger behind the Munich-based StyleClicker.net, made a decision. He he’d had enough of Fashion Week self-promotion, of style stars in brand name dresses lingering outside runway shows. He he’d had enough of the grind and the buzz of the street style hype machine, the competition among photographers over the same image, the regurgitation of the same clean, high fashion aesthetic. It was

Dress and Cultural Aesthetics

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

As discussed in Chapter 1, “Why Study Dress?” culture is the predominant phenomenon that explains why humans behave in the ways they do, including the behavior of dressing. Cultural mentifacts (e.g., attitudes, beliefs, values, ideology) and sociofacts (e.g., social organizations including religious, education, government, family structure) help to explain cultural artifacts (e.g., clothing, appearance products, houses, household goods, vehicles, tools, equipment). In this chapter, we explore lev

Dress and Cultural Rituals

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

As noted in Chapter 1, “Why Study Dress?” culture is the way that humans organize their world. It is the fundamental determinant of how we live as we do and how that life is shaped. When we contemplate how our lives are shaped, and how our lives are different from the lives of others, we see that they are shaped by our values and view of the world, our lifestyles, our traditions, and the products of human workmanship that we use and that surround us.

Records of the Types of Dress

Joanne B. Eicher and Sandra Lee Evenson

Source: The Visible Self. Global Perspectives on Dress, Culture, and Society, 4th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

At the conclusion of this chapter, you will be able to:

Written Interpretations of Dress

Joanne B. Eicher and Sandra Lee Evenson

Source: The Visible Self. Global Perspectives on Dress, Culture, and Society, 4th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

At the conclusion of this chapter, you will be able to:

Gloves ‘of the Very Thin Sort’: Gifting Limerick Gloves in the Late Eighteenth and Early Nineteenth Centuries

Liza Foley

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Although leather was essential for the production of a wide range of eighteenth-century objects, including gloves, very little consideration has been given to the significance of the materiality of leather itself. As historian Giorgio Riello has shown, leather was a scarce material in pre-Industrial England. ‘Confined to the natural world and to a stable cattle asset’ (2008: 77), its production largely depended on the meat market, which, in the case of sheep, and to a greater extent cattle, accou

Introduction

M. Angela Jansen

Source: Moroccan Fashion. Design, tradition and modernity, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

It is only in the past fifteen years that ‘fashion of traditional dress’ gained the attention of social scientists, simply because it was considered a contradictio in terminis. It was probably John Flügel (1950 [1930]: 129–30) who set the trend in the 1930s by introducing his dichotomy ‘fixed’ versus ‘modish’ costume, whereby ‘fixed costume changes slowly in time, and its whole value depends, to some extent, upon its permanence’. Modish costume, on the other hand, he explains, ‘changes very rapid

Conclusion

M. Angela Jansen

Source: Moroccan Fashion. Design, tradition and modernity, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The main aim of this research has been to analyse Moroccan fashion as a materialization of social, cultural, political, economic and religious developments in Moroccan society, because until now Moroccan fashion has been predominantly studied as physical objects in which the materials and construction of the garments have been given primacy over their social and cultural meanings. Simultaneously, this research has aimed to contest prevailing misconceptions concerning traditional dress as being st

Un/Timely Fashion

Heike Jenss

Source: Fashioning Memory. Vintage Style and Youth Culture, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Fashion and Anthropology

Brent Luvaas

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Anthropologists have largely shied away from the study of fashion, preferring to focus their attention to dress on those everyday items that define an individual as part of an enduring cultural tradition. Only in the last two decades, as anthropologists have shifted their attention to global processes, have they begun to look at fashion specifically as a site of critical enquiry. As they do so, they bring with them a disciplinary attention to the messy and contradictory lived experiences that mak

Dress and Textiles in Transition: The Sungudi Sari Revival of Tamilnadu, India

Kala Shreen

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

What is sungudi? A craftsperson ties a thread around a tiny portion of fabric, knots it tightly and repeats. Once the fabric is dyed and the knots untied, the previously knotted areas will transform into tiny dots (Plate 24. Traditionally sungudi was used for cotton saris. Thousands of such dots decorate a sungudi sari; it contains 20,000 knots on average. Depending on the number of knots tied, a sungudi sari may take seven to fifteen days to make. According to the documents produced by the Gover

The Empress’s Old Clothes: Biographies of African Dress at the Victoria And Albert Museum

Nicola Stylianou

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

On 20 April 1869 the V&A accessioned a number of objects from Ethiopia including clothes and jewellery that were listed in the museum register as having been given to the museum by the ‘Secretary of State for India’ and ‘belonging formerly to the Queen of Abyssinia’ (V&A 1869). At this time the V&A had not yet been divided into departments with objects being accepted for inclusion in the museum on the grounds of design excellence or as demonstrations of particular techniques. Included in this gif

Bibliographic guide

Dress, along with cloth, textiles, and adornment, has been an important part of the study of material culture in anthropology since the early times of the discipline, when the focus was on cross-cultural variation and the relationships between different parts of culture and their changes. Some earlier studies aimed specifically to record the significance of material culture in the face of change in a manner that sometimes has been described as “salvage anthropology.” A later generation of anthrop, Berg Fashion Library

Bibliographic guide

Sources employed for the study of dress history include documents, visual representations, and material artifacts. Documents include all manner of written records such as wills, inventories, wardrobe accounts, bills of sale, advice on dressing, as well as eyewitness accounts of how people dressed in the past. An early example would be the Roman historian Tacitus, who described the dress of the inhabitants of central Europe in Germania in 98 C.E. The visual record includes paintings, drawings, eng, Berg Fashion Library

Conclusion

Helen Warner

Source: Fashion on Television. Identity and Celebrity Culture, 2014, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

We can all thank Sex and the City for really giving TV audiences a fashion education. The first episode aired in 1998 and the show was groundbreaking for fashion in popular culture…what we’re seeing now [on television] is the evolution of that.

The Meaning of Style between Classic and Queer

Adam Geczy and Vicki Karaminas

Source: Queer Style, 2013, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

It’s part of my bad side.

Caught on Camera: The Fashioned Body and The Criminal Body

Nilgin Yusuf

Source: Fashion Media. Past and Present, 2013, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Fashion. noun; a popular or the latest style of clothing, hair decoration or behaviour *the production and marketing of new styles of clothing and cosmetics *a manner of doing something.

Introduction: The DIY Ethos

Brent Luvaas

Source: DIY Style. Fashion, Music and Global Digital Cultures, 2012, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

First and foremost, we have here a discourse that is authoritarian: one has to express oneself, one has to speak, communicate, cooperate, and so forth.

Subcultural Body Style History

Therèsa M. Winge

Source: Body Style, 2012, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

From the time we are born, the human body is modified for physical, spiritual, psychological, social, and cultural transformations. In fact, prehistoric mummies found in recent years suggest that body practices, modifications, associated supplements, and rituals were significant in the earliest of human cultures (Winge 2003). In 1991 a frozen Stone Age male mummy was found in the Ötztal Alps. Nicknamed Ötzi, this mummy shows evidence of possibly the earliest body modifications ever discovered. Re

Aboriginal Dress in the Kimberley, Western Australia

Kim Akerman

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

As in most other areas of Australia, the Aboriginals of the Kimberley were traditionally unclothed. For them, dress consisted of headbands and hair belts. Pubic tassels (made by tying multiple strands of spun fur or hair string into a mop, suspended over the genital area) were worn occasionally. Other elements of dress consisted of ornaments made from feathers, fibers, animal teeth, or shell, the use of which was often dictated by the ceremonial and social status of the wearer. More complex ornam

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