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Sartorial Boundaries on the Chinese Frontier

Antonia Finnane

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present 2017

Book chapter

I return home and see my kin …

Ideology, Fashion and the Darlys’ “Macaroni” Prints

Peter Mcneil

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present 2017

Book chapter

Painted caricatures began on the “Grand TourGrand Tour” as private jokes shared between young men and their tutors. Private Italian painters working in Florence inspired the English development of this field. Etchings were made by Pier Leone Ghezzi (1674–1755) and Pietro Longhi (1702–85), and painted in Rome by English artists including Sir Joshua Reynolds and Thomas Patch (1725–82). Horace Walpole wrote in his journal thus: “Patch was excellent in Caricatura, and was in much favour with the youn

Breastfeeding, Ideology and Clothing in Nineteenth-Century France

Gal Ventura

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present 2017

Book chapter

The human species has always been dependent on breastfeeding, at least until the last third of the nineteenth century, when Louis Pasteur (1822–1895) invented the pasteurization of animal milk to be used to feed infants. Indeed, while examining artistic depictions of infant feeding through Western history, bottle-feeding was extremely rare in comparison to nursing women.See for example: Hubert Robert, Jeune femme tenant un biberon à un bébé, 1773, oil on canvas, 22 x 27 cm, Valence, Musée des Bea

Walter Van Beirendonck

Paula Alaszkiewicz

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Charles James

Rio Ali

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Romeo Gigli

Rio Ali

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Traje De Crioula: Representing Nineteenth-Century Afro-Brazilian Dress

Aline T. and Monteiro Damgaard

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice 2015

Book chapter

This chapter examines representations of Afro-Brazilian dress from nineteenth-century Brazil with the aim of examining the traje de crioula’s origin, formation and influence. The research includes comparative analysis of a broad range of nineteenth-century visual representations and written descriptions alongside analysis of surviving garments currently held in museum collections, and their subsequent interpretation and display. To present a case study for this chapter, a sample of four images is

Consuelo Castiglioni

Giulia Bussinello

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Yves Saint Laurent, Spring/Summer 1988 Haute Couture

Lorynn Divita

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Throughout his career, Yves Saint Laurent famously drew inspiration from all of the fine arts, including painting, opera, the ballet, literature, poetry, and the works of Shakespeare. The influence of various painters on Saint Laurent’s creations dates back to his famous fall/winter 1965 “Mondrian Poliakoff” collection. His spring/summer 1988 collection, a tribute to cubism and impressionism and the work of Georges Braque and Vincent Van Gogh, was a natural fit into his oeuvre, with jackets embro

Kosuke Tsumura

Alessandro Esculapio

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

‘Look At Me I’M Different!’: Identity Art And The Expectations Of Race

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art 2015

Book chapter

National identification is an exemplary case of how an external border is reflected into an internal limit. Of course, the first step towards the identity of the nation is defined through differences from other nations, via an external border: if I identify myself as an Englishman, I distinguish myself from the French, German, Scots, Irish, and so on. However, in the next stage, the question is raised of who among the English are ‘the real English’, the paradigm of Englishness; who are the Englis

The Artist as Impresario, the Artist as Brand: from Baudelaire to Barney

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art 2015

Book chapter

So much of the world is advertising, and because of that, individuals feel they have to present themselves as a package.

Less is Less: Formlessness

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art 2015

Book chapter

formlessnessWell, concerning civility or public morality, you can now see what’s happening in art. For any art exhibition in London, for example, to be effective, it must be something disgusting: show some dead fish or the excrement of cows. At one exhibition, my god, they showed a video of a colonoscopy. Today, more and more, the cultural-economic apparatus itself has to incite stronger and more shocking effects and products. These are the recent trends in the arts. But the thing is that transgr

Exoticism At The Brink: Contemporary Chinese And Aboriginal Art

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art 2015

Book chapter

For a better understanding of this conundrum, it is useful to digress briefly using another analogy from the fashion industry proper. At the same time as Aboriginal art was ‘born’ in the 1970s, Parisian couture began to experience an extraordinary change with the entry of new designers: Takada, KenzoKenzo, Rei Kawakubo, ReiKawakubo (Comme des Garçons), Issey Miyake, IsseyMiyake, Yamomoto, YohjiYohji Yamamoto and Hanae Mori, HanaeMori are the most successful of these, now hailed as bringing about

Introduction

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art 2015

Book chapter

And now the art world has become so big and stars seem to come and go as swiftly as reality television characters in Hollywood …

What is Fashionable Art?

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art 2015

Book chapter

the erosion of the older distinction between high culture and so-called mass or popular culture. This is perhaps the most distressing development of all from the academic standpoint, which has traditionally had a vested interest in preserving a realm of high, or elite culture against the surrounding environment of philistinism, of schlock, and kitschkitsch, of TV series and Reader’s DigestReader’s Digest culture, and in transmitting difficult and complex skills of reading, listening and seeing to

Come Fly With Me: Participatory Art, Interactivity And Audience Involvement

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art 2015

Book chapter

interactivityinteractivityparticipatory artaudience involvementrelational aestheticsRelational Aesthetics is also when a successful artist, um, who is too busy touring the globe going from biennial to biennial, and they have no time to make physical art objects any more, so the famous artist uses the attendees at the exhibition as the artwork in some way, you know what I’m saying, like to explore the social relationships between people and y’know this kind of practice is really good when you’re a

Minimalism: Donald Judd Or Ikea?

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art 2015

Book chapter

Minimalist artists constructed simple, monochromatic, geometric objects of formal symmetry, characterized by an absence of traditional composition. Minimalism was an extreme abstract art, not imitative but solipsistic, self-referential: it was unto itself, harking back to the idea of truth to materials whose lineage can be located in the Russian Constructivists (particularly Rodchenko, AleksandrRodchenko and El Lissitzky) through to Moore, HenryMoore, Hepworth, BarbaraHepworth, Gabo, NoamGabo, Pe

Video Art And Videophilia

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art 2015

Book chapter

From the beginning, video art was understood as anti-establishment. It can lay claim to a unique origin: unlike other visual arts media, it was forged in the crucible of contemporary, rather than modern, classical or ancient, art. It had no tradition so was not beholden to it. It had no canon so could start from scratch in response to its immediate circumstances. It had no critical discourse so was not accountable to it. It promised to democratize the production of images. Video art emerged at th

Inside-Out: Outsider Artists Go Inside

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art 2015

Book chapter

The term ‘Outsider Art’ was coined in 1972 (a year after the ‘birth’ of Contemporary Aboriginal, Aboriginal artAboriginal art) by the English art critic Roger Cardinal, RogerCardinal as an umbrella term to describe the art produced by those not associated with, admitted to or educated by the art scene, denoting usually the insane, but also the parochial ingenue. ‘Outsider Art’ also incorporates the ‘Art BrutArt Brut’ of French postwar artist Jean Dubuffet, JeanDubuffet, and folk art as part of it

Conclusion: Fashionable Art

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art 2015

Book chapter

Mitsuhiro Matsuda

Elizabeth Glendinning

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Bill Blass, Spring/Summer 1988

Michelle Honig

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

This collection was inspired by Matisse paintings that Bill Blass saw while at the National Gallery in Washington. Shown at the Parsons School of Design in New York, the clothes were short and full of froufrou due to the influence of “the sugar daddy of bonbon chic” and designer of the moment Christian Lacroix, and his short, little-girl styles. Hems were well above the knees, which concerned retailers servicing working women needing office-appropriate clothes. Even though critics liked his use o

Lolita Lempicka

Morna Laing

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Salvador Dalí

Lucy Moyse

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Mystifying, intriguing, thought-provoking: the layered work of the Spanish artist Salvador Dalí (1904–1989) appeared across painting, drawing, film, and sculpture. He is best known for his involvement in the artistic and literary movement of surrealism, which explored the unconscious. However, Dalí’s increasingly commercial endeavors and lifelong interest in dress led him to become hugely influential in fashion, from his meticulously flamboyant self-presentation to his collaborations with couturi

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