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Chloé

Morna Laing

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Influence of North American Indian and First Nations Dress on Mainstream Fashion

Pamela C. Baker and Phyllis G. Tortora

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Fashion designers of First Nations and North American Indian ancestry began to feel confident about being referred to as fashion designers only by the early 1970s. Fashion has not always been important to indigenous people, but telling a story has. Through their work these designers believe they are telling the story of their people; they are passionate about their work and especially passionate about how it supports their communities. The difference between North American aboriginal design and m

Barbier, Georges*

Michele Majer

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In Michael Arlen’s best-selling 1924 novel, The Green Hat, the heroine Iris March is compared to a figure in a Barbier fashion illustration: “She stood carelessly like the women in Georges Barbier’s almanacs, Falbalas et Fanfreluches, who know how to stand carelessly. Her hands were thrust into the pockets of a light brown leather jacket—pour le sport” (Steele, p. 247). The casual elegance ascribed to Arlen’s character, a quintessential element of the 1920s fashion ideal, epitomizes Barbier’s fig

Influence of the Arts

Jo Ann Stabb

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The relationship of art to dress in any part of the world and at any time is complex, as is the case in the United States and Canada. Both art and dress reflect and share not only aesthetic elements but also parallel cultural, social, philosophical, geographical, technological, political, gender, and religious influences of any particular era. This confluence, or zeitgeist, characterizes the spirit of the times and defines the prevailing style. Yet even while sharing the formal visual elements of

Art Nouveau and Art Deco

Lou Taylor

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

This appropriation of art nouveau styling coincided with the moment in the history of couture when a united business structure was firmly established by the Chambre Syndicale de la Couture Parisienne. Unrivaled elsewhere in the Western world, Paris couturiers dressed the women of international royal courts and high society including in Japan and tsarist Russia, the wives of the wealthiest international plutocrats, and the great actresses of the Paris stage. Commercial clients already included the

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