Results: Text (15) Images (0)

Filtered by:

Clear filters
Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 15 of 15 (1 pages)
    Page 1 of 1
Brief history of contemporary fashion

Chelsea Rousso and Nancy Kaplan Ostroff

Source: Fashion Forward. A Guide to Fashion Forecasting, 2nd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The “spirit of the times,” or zeitgeistzeitgeist, refers to the current state of culture: the expression of the present. The mode of an era is determined by a complex mixture of historical, social, psychological, and aesthetic factors. During each era, creative artists and designers are inspired by current influences that they interpret into innovative ideas and products. It is not surprising that there are commonalities that influence an era. New aesthetics, newaesthetics can often be found in v

Ups and Downs of Paris Fashion

Valerie Steele

Source: Paris Fashion. A Cultural History, 3rd Edition, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Nous sortions d’une époque de guerre, d’uniformes, de femmessoldats aux carrures de boxeurs. Je dessinai des femmes-fleurs, épaules douces, bustes épanouis, tailles fines comme lianes et jupes larges comme corolles.ChristianDior, Christian Dior et moi (Paris: Amiot-Domont, 1956), p. 35. Translation in text by Valerie Steele.

John Galliano for Christian Dior Ready-to-Wear, Spring/Summer 1999

Paula Alaszkiewicz

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

In late 1996, after a relatively short tenure at Givenchy, it was announced that John Galliano would replace Gianfranco Ferré at fellow LVMH-owned Christian Dior. His arrival at Dior corresponded with the house’s fiftieth anniversary and Galliano’s first task was to create an haute couture collection. The show was staged in a recreated couture salon and featured Galliano’s signature theatricality. Drama of presentation later culminated with the fall/winter 1998–1999 couture show “A Voyage on the

Christian Dior

Lauren Bowes

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

The New Look: Fashion Conformity Prevails

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

During the 1950s the world became a much smaller place. The rapid development of air travel, the almost instant transmission of news from one part of the world to another, and the transition from national to globally interdependent economies spread fashion and other information faster than ever before (Figure 17.1). It was no longer possible to understand the historical background of a period by examining developments only in western Europe and North America.

The New Look: Fashion Conformity Prevails, 1947–1960

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume. Student Study Guide, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

Yohji Yamamoto, Fall/Winter 1991

Nadya Wang

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Yohji Yamamoto became famous in the 1980s as part of a trio of Japanese fashion designers (together with Rei Kawakubo and Issey Miyake) known for their avant-garde, antiestablishment, deconstructionist aesthetic, in a rejection and overturning of Western notions of beauty and form. For his fall/winter 1991 menswear collection, which was modeled by musicians, Yamamoto gave fans the relaxed silhouettes that they had come to expect from the forward-thinking fashion designer, and took inspiration fro

France

Kimberly Chrisman-Campbell

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The French Revolution abolished the rigid dress etiquette and bureaucracy of the ancien régime fashion industry. Napoleon’s campaigns inspired fashions with soldierly details and created a vogue for exotic accessories. His imperial court ensured the survival of French luxury goods industries, while promoting a more modern silhouette. Napoleon encouraged pre-Revolutionary tastes for classical Greek and Roman styles, to glorify his own reign. The restoration of the Bourbon monarchy and the Romantic

Historical Dress in French Film

Jennie Cousins

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Films featuring recreations of historical dress have long been a staple of French cinema. Genres such as the war film, the historical film, and the colonial film all frequently feature costumes informed by the past, yet it is the costume drama that has come to be most readily associated with historical dress. Indeed, in this type of film, costume has become inseparable from drama. Despite falling in and out of favor with film critics, academics, and audiences alike, the costume drama has never be

Underwear

Grace Evans

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The fashionable silhouette has gone through bewildering changes during the last two hundred years, and these would not have been possible without the shapes created beneath. Underwear and outerwear progressed in tandem. Underwear designers responded to prevailing styles of fashionable dress, and fashion designers built and relied upon the capabilities of structural underpinnings as they developed. These changes were, in turn, influenced by key social, economic, and technological developments, whi

Fashion Designers

Peter McNeil

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Fashion designers are associated in the popular imagination with haute couture (high fashion) and famous individuals. Fashionable clothing requires a concept and also fabrication; sometimes this process is symbiotic, as in the work of many twentieth-century fashion designers. Fashion design can also be linked to aspects of the trades and seen as a vernacular activity with a much longer history. The development of the idea of the fashion designer requires an understanding of the history of making

Dior, Christian*

Eric Pujalet-Plaà

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Jean Ozenne, who was designing for couture houses, introduced Dior to the fashion world and to his clientele. At the age of thirty, Dior devoted himself to studying fashion drawing, referring only to what he knew and appreciated of Edward Molyneux, Coco Chanel, Elsa Schiaparelli, and Jeanne Lanvin. He managed to sell his first sketches of hats and then of dresses. His clients were fashionable hat makers and couture houses but he “also sold ideas to foreign buyers.” Publication of his drawings in

New Look

Eric Pujalet-Plaà

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Film

Patricia Campbell Warner

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Perhaps nothing in the twentieth century has influenced North American clothing more than film or, to use the more prosaic term, the movies. Many authors have written about the role of the designer throughout the past hundred years, claiming that the fashionable style and look comes essentially from that rarified source, but a close look at the history of the movies and their pervasive role in modern society suggests otherwise. From their beginning in the 1890s, films have fascinated, captivated,

Body Type Evaluation

Nancy Plummer

Source: Your Personal Style, 2009, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

“But those aren’t the flavors. That’d make too much sense. Apple and pear, according to Dr. Phil, are body types the bars are made for. Hey, I’ve got some advice. If you look like an apple or a pear, eat an apple or a pear!”

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 15 of 15 (1 pages)
Page 1 of 1