Results: Text (54) Images (0)

You searched for

Modify your search terms or add filters

Filtered by

Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 25 of 54 (3 pages)
    Page 1 of 3
Striptease

Barbara Brownie

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Striptease is a public performance of the otherwise private act of undressing. It is characterized by its emphasis on clothes, rather than the body beneath. As a demonstration of transformation, striptease highlights the capacity for clothes to conceal and reveal what lies beneath, be it a naked body or another layer of cloth. Catwalk shows make regular use of elements of striptease, layering garments so that ensembles can be revealed piece by piece. More overt references to erotic striptease are

Elvis Presley

Fiona Corbridge

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Elvis Presley’s ascent from impoverished childhood to worldwide fame as a singer and actor in the 1950s allowed him to indulge a love of clothes that began as a teenager. A career of over twenty years established a sharp-dressing persona, graduating into extravagant stage attire in the 1970s. The shock of his early death only served to increase the public’s fascination with him and to immortalize him as a cultural icon. Elvis’s handsome image continues to reassert itself in the early twenty-first

Madonna

Fiona Corbridge

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Madonna—singer, actress, entertainer—has maintained a consistently high profile since the early 1980s, when her feisty image and eclectic style choices resonated with a generation of young women. Sexualized, underwear-revealing costumes popularized the trend for underwear-as-outerwear. Her profile has ensured that designers have been thrilled to design for her, disseminating couture values to a wide audience; fashion has in turn absorbed her influence and aspects of her look continue to be regene

Subcultural Body Style and Identity

Therèsa M. Winge

Source: Body Style 2012

Book chapter

Each subculture member has individual lived body experiences, which collectively create the generalizations about the subculture’s identity. These generalizations are then further extended to collective ideas about identity regarding the individual member, the specific subculture, and the entirety of all subcultures to some degree. The subcultural body becomes an amalgam of experiences—for example, piercings, tattoos, spiky hair, and propensity toward pain. Furthermore, each subculture has unwrit

Book chapter

Such subtleties can speak volumes. As John Berger (1972) has established, it is at the level of representation that the ‘normal’ position of women is established, controlled and managed, since seeing repeated images which show the same patterns of behaviour come to define our sense of how things ‘should be’. Thus, such images or representations are the way in which we give meaning and order to the world (see Hall 1997). In an analysis which centres on the female nude in the historical trajectory

Dress of the Cook Islands

Kalissa Alexeyeff

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Cook Islands dress of the twenty-first century is a vibrant mixture of local, Western, and regional influences. Traces of the islands’ missionary and colonial history are also evident and reflect an ongoing incorporation of external styles and aesthetics. Since the Cook Islands gained independence in 1965, the revival of local dress practices of the past has been viewed as an important way of forging an independent nation-state. Traditional dress, primarily worn in performance contexts in the ear

Dress in Kiribati

Petra M. Autio

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Republic of Kiribati is a central Pacific state, which consists of thirty-three tiny atolls and reef islands scattered over a vast ocean area corresponding to one-third the size of the United States. It includes three island groups—the Gilbert, Phoenix, and Line Islands—and the island of Banaba. Apart from the Banabans, who have their own, though related, history, the Gilbert Islands chain straddling the equator is where people originally settled, and where the majority (90%) of the populatio

Performance Dress in Japan

Monica Bethe

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In early-twenty-first-century Japan, theater and dance performances range from the avant-garde to traditional performing arts that trace their beginnings to periods spanning over a thousand years. The costumes worn for these traditional performances reflect styles of dress prevalent at various historical periods, though not necessarily the period corresponding to the inception of the art in question. The story of performance costume must therefore be seen against the background of the history of

Performance Dress in China and Taiwan

Alexandra B. Bonds, Dongshin Chang and Elizabeth Johnson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Over three hundred forms of indigenous theater entertainment incorporating song and music have evolved in China, with different forms of music-dramas being performed in specific regions throughout the country. Among these forms, Kunqu (songs of Kunshan) took shape in the Lower Yangtze region of China in the mid-sixteenth century, attained national popularity in the following two centuries, and is still thriving in the early twenty-first century. Jingju (capital drama), commonly known in the West

Festivals Pacific-Style

Susan Cochrane

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Examples of ceremonial dress can be found around the world. In the Pacific, festivals as ceremonies celebrate Pacific life and occur in local, regional, national, and international contexts. At the community level, every school has its culture day, every church its fete, and every family and clan celebrates events in the life cycle. On the regional level, provincial governments organize festivals or “shows” to bring the communities under their jurisdiction together to celebrate unity and diversit

Dance Costumes

Margaret A. Deppe

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The category of dance costume is a specialized type of dress usually reserved for performances and masquerade. In North Africa as elsewhere, dance costumes are worn for performances at special events and in entertainment venues. Three general categories of dance in North Africa are raks shaabi (popular dance), raks beledi (country dance), and raks sharqi (eastern dance).

The Māori Pari (Bodice)

Jo Diamond

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The pari is a Māori bodice of the rāranga type, worn with a piupiu (a type of fibrous skirt) and Māori jewelry by women in cultural performances including competitions, concerts, and festivals. Rāranga is a generic naming for plaited (as opposed to loom) handweaving practices undertaken mostly, though not exclusively, by Māori women. Māori performances usually occur in order to promote traditional practices, but for some they include a more material reward or prize money or are part of fund-raisi

Dress as Costume in the Theater and Performing Arts

Sandra Lee Evenson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In costume, individuals become characters of plays. Dressing for the performing arts works the same way. The performing arts include theater, dance, opera, films, television, and the circus. Costumes are made up of supplements to the body such as gowns and wigs, also including body modifications like makeup. Stylized Japanese Noh masks completely transform actors and constitute artwork in themselves. Throughout most of the history of theater, actors had to supply their own makeup and costumes, bu

Striptease

Jessica Glasscock

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Figure Skating Dress and Costume

Moira F. Harris

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The earliest dress for an ice-skater was basic winter-weather gear. Coats or jackets, pants or skirts, mittens or gloves, and hats or scarves protected skaters from the cold and damp. Early paintings and prints give evidence of these choices. In the nineteenth century concerns for health and fitness led to an interest in outdoor recreation. In many cities clubs were formed, and outdoor rinks were planned and built in parks. Clothing intended for skaters’ use was increasingly available. Competitio

Ballet Costume

Thomas Hecht

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The origins of ballet lie in the court spectacles of the Renaissance in France and Italy, and evidence of costumes specifically for ballet can be dated to the early fifteenth century. Illustrations from this period show the importance of masks and clothing for spectacles. Splendor at court was strongly reflected in luxuriously designed ballet costumes. Cotton and silk were mixed with flax woven into semitransparent gauze.

Textiles and Dress of the Motu Koita People

Jacquelyn A. Lewis-Harris

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Papua New Guinea, the eastern half of the island New Guinea (the second-largest island in the world), lies just north of Australia and has several hundred outer islands. Annexed and subdivided by the Germans and British in 1884, Papua New Guinea became an independent nation in 1975. The country has a vast variety of cultures and at least eight hundred languages. The Motu and Koita people inhabited the southern coastal and immediate inland areas of Papua New Guinea, living between the western coas

Armenia

Gary Lind-Sinanian and Susan Lind-Sinanian

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Historically and geographically, the land of Armenia has been identified for the last 2,600 years with the great plateau in eastern Asia Minor and the adjacent Transcaucasus Mountains, a vast (100,000-square-mile or 260,000-square-kilometer) highland of rolling hills and steep mountain valleys. Most of the Armenian population in this area was deported or exterminated during World War I, and the area identified in the early twenty-first century politically as the Republic of Armenia actually compr

Cosplay

Frenchy Lunning

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Cosplay, short for “costume play,” refers to a global practice of building costumes and performing as characters from manga (Japanese comic books), anime (Japanese animation), and other popular sources. Cosplay is also a Japanese subculture, whose performance venue is more public than fan conventions. The term came into usage as the influx of Japanese anime and manga became significant at science fiction and comic book conventions. However, anime- and manga-based cosplay differ from that of scien

Competitive Ballroom Dance

Jonathan S. Marion

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Competitive ballroom costuming facilitates and maximizes the artistic and expressive impact of competitors’ dancing. It is meant to accentuate the movements of dancers’ performances and enhance the artistic images being produced. Artistic costume on the one hand, ballroom dress serves simultaneously as functional athletic wear that must stand up to the physical rigors and stresses involved in the tremendous movement and motion competitors produce. Balancing art and athletics, and in line with spe

Dance Costumes in French Polynesia

Jane Freeman Moulin

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Among the customs French Polynesians perpetuate in the twenty-first century, the public performance of choreographed group dances is one of the most popular and highly enjoyed by local audiences. These may be as a school celebration, a way to acknowledge and greet important visitors, an accompaniment to the large buffets that local residents and visitors enjoy at the tourist hotels, or as part of the yearly music and dance competitions known as Heiva. Viewed as a locus of artistic creativity in t

Cross-Dressing in South Asia

Alka Pande

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Cross-dressing is the act of wearing clothing associated with another gender within a society, although a person who cross-dresses does not always identify as having a gender different from that assigned at birth. The androgyny of ancient Indian gods and goddesses implies the merging of the male and female principle. Brahma, the Hindu creator god, first created images of Prajapati, a male creator having a womb. He lacked the power to create women until Siva appeared before him in an androgynous f

Popular Music and Dress in Australia

Sue Ryan

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Australian pop and rock music has been inseparable from fashion since the 1950s. Australia had a popular musical culture from the first days of European settlement, but in the 1950s rock ’n’ roll and pop began to dominate other musical forms. Taking shape as an industry, they were supported by and supported the arrival of television, the growing print media, and radio, which continued to be an essential social bond and cultural disseminator. Dress was increasingly the key that proved to audiences

Muharram and Dress

Ashgar Seyed-Gohrab

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

National and religious festivals serve as visible signs of renewal, initiation rituals, reenactments of the oath of the community, and reminders of particular identities. To indicate these aspects of a festival, people dress themselves in special attire, depending on the nature of the festival. Muharram is one of the most eminent festivals of the Shiites.

Dress and Appearance in Tahiti

Karen Stevenson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Tahiti is one of the Society Islands and the largest island of French Polynesia. It has a tropical climate, and its flora and fauna have been fundamental to the attire made by indigenous Tahitians. Body modification in early Tahiti was used as a visual marker of status within a highly ranked society. The Tahitian social system was founded in a system of primogeniture, in which one’s rank was determined by birth, a system that necessitated a wealth and complexity of embellishment and regalia to de

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 25 of 54 (3 pages)
Page 1 of 3