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North American Influences on West European Dress

Rebecca Arnold

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

North America’s effect on West European fashion is often viewed only in relation to Hollywood and celebrity. However, its influence has been far more diverse, from technological inventions to leisure wear and the professionalization of the industry.

Size and Fit in Industrially Produced Clothes

Karen Borregaard

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The defining characteristic of ready-to-wear clothes, which differentiates them from made-to-measure clothes, is that they are produced in standard sizes to fit individuals whose exact body dimensions are not known by producers. The aim of standard sizes is to fit as many in a target group as possible. Size refers to both a garment’s measurements and the way size is communicated to customers. In addition, each ready-to-wear style is produced in a range of sizes, known as a sizing system. The numb

The Structure and Form of European Clothes

Peter McNeil

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Clothing is both a material covering and an enclosure for the body that in West Europe is generally constructed through draping or cutting cloth or through weaving or knitting it to shape. The structure of European dress is also bound up with abstract ideals of conduct and beauty. The aesthetic and phenomenological dimension of clothing moving in space is also significant. Some fashions such as women’s court dress from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries were designed to be “read” from a fro

Footwear

Giorgio Riello

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The importance of shoes in twenty-first-century Western society extends well beyond their functional use. Through their material appearance—their texture, weight, and design—shoes express abstract ideas that range from sexual appeal to allure, smartness, and informality. Shoes, therefore, are not just accessories that decorate the body or allow people to embrace the latest fashion; they convey messages that are understood across society. High heels stand for exaggerated femininity; red shoes for

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