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Tracing Trends in Heian and Edo

Sheila Cliffe

Source: The Social Life of Kimono. Japanese Fashion Past and Present, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

It is probably impossible to pinpoint a moment or location at which fashion started. Chapter 1 outlined five defining aspects of fashion from a body of fashion fashiontheorytheory, and now we return to the story of kimono, in the light of those five aspects. References to clothing used in functional ways or to uphold custom(s)customs, traditions, or the status quo are to be expected, so here the search is for deviations from such norms. The search is for any shreds of evidence of clothing used in

Introduction: Placing Sneakers within Sociology

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: Sneakers. Fashion, Gender, and Subculture, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Footwear is a garment characterized by a long history. In prehistoric times, it was a simple piece of wood or leather and was used to protect the foot. Today shoes are more than functional objects. They convey a wide range of meanings associated with fashion, style, personality, sexualitysexuality, gender, and classclass. (Riello 2006: 1)

Academic Research on Footwear

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: Sneakers. Fashion, Gender, and Subculture, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Human beings have been covering their feet and wearing some form of footwear for centuries. While there are countless accounts on who created the first shoes or why/where they were first made, the primary common reason for wearing shoes was to protect feet from an unpleasant or dangerous natural environment. For instance, an American sailor’s shoe in the nineteenth century was made out of hemp cord because it provided traction even when it was wet, and double rubber-walled insulated boots were ma

Sneakers as a Symbol of Manhood: Wearing Masculinity on Their Feet

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: Sneakers. Fashion, Gender, and Subculture, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

There is a consensus among dress and fashion scholars that human footwear was not always gendered, but there are different accounts as to when footwear became gender-specific. The distinction between ladies’ shoemakers and men’s shoemakers in the eighteenth century clearly indicates that footwear was gendered.

Conclusion: Future Directions And Possibilities in Footwear Studies

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: Sneakers. Fashion, Gender, and Subculture, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

I initially came to Japan as a teacher. I wanted to be here because there are great sneakers in Japan. Then friends back home started asking me to buy some pairs that are found only in Japan. I started getting so many orders, and I became so busy that I had to quit my teaching job. I now buy and sell sneakers full-time in Tokyo.

Introduction

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

White Lotus, the theme of the funeral that has transported us into the world of fashion designers and the South Delhi business elite, is a fitting metaphor for the key motif of this book. It is also a fitting metaphor for the ethnographic journey in which this work is grounded and for its analytical angle. Like the lotus, the beauties ritualof Indian fashion and heritage luxuryheritage luxury cannot be conceived without their juxtaposition, without the mud from which they grow and that brings the

Neo-Feudal Ornamentalism and Elitist Fantasies

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The first chapter introduces the Indian fashion industry, the dominant neo-aristocratic aesthetics in contemporary luxury fashion design and the recent intensification of the business elites’ obsession with displays of opulent Indianness and their desire to master time and space through conspicous displays of status. It walks the reader through three key rituals. First, the interactions between designers and their clients in the studios, where they ‘celebrate Indianness’ together. Second, the fas

Producing Cosmopolitanism, Hierarchy and Social Cohesion

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The second chapter develops the theme of imagined economy and India’s superpowerdom by focusing on the symptomatic commodification of past and heritage in fashion design. It does so by zooming onto the complex material and ideological production of traditional chikan embroidery from Lucknow, a city remembered for its past opulence, cosmopolitanism and luxurious lifestyle. It traces the movement of this embroidery, popular with India’s leading designers, from the local networks of its material pro

Design Genius and his Ghost Others

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The third chapter turns to the tensed relations between design and craft. Developing further the case of chikan embroidery, as it moves from villages to fashion boutiques, the chapter analyses the ways in which material labour is artificially separated from immaterial labour. It shows how the designers’ narratives about creativity, innovation and artistic genius systematically push craftspeople into invisibility, inferiority and passivity, and deny their creativity, individuality and agency. The

Charitable Non-Love and Philanthrocapitalism

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Chapter 4 further develops the theme of power relations between design and craft and between the rich and the poor. Many designers working with craftspeople also run non-governmental organizations to ‘empower’ these workers, while cultivating the rhetoric of ethical business and philanthropy, and offering their customers in addition to luxurious clothing also good conscience. Such NGOs and trusts become effective tools of co-option of the village workforce into the capitalist system and reproduce

Conclusion

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The conclusion reviews the central points of the work, focusing especially on the power dynamics between the producers and designers, the poor and the rich, the rise of expert privilege and the logic of philanthrocapitalism as an instrument of power. It claims that the current philanthrocapitalism that has taken elite India by storm is deeply neo-feudal in its nature while being wrapped up in rhetoric of good intentions. As such it is a telling sign of the times of brutally rising socio-economic

Trend Forecasters—Fashion’s “Insurance Companies”

Jenny Lantz

Source: The Trendmakers. Behind the Scenes of the Global Fashion Industry, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

We used to say that if you can find areas of fear, uncertainty and doubt, that’s a sign that you should study them more closely. (Neil Bradford, CEO (2008–2009), WGSNWGSN)

Dress and Socialization

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Key to the understanding of a society is the concept of social position. You will recall from Chapter 10, “Dress and Identity,” that every society, regardless of its size, is comprised of a set of social positions. For example, typically there are individuals who formally or informally lead the members of the society (e.g., Presidents, chiefs, executives) and those who follow (e.g., citizens, members, employees). This example has two simple social positions: Leader and follower.

Dress and Social Organizations

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Individuals who live and interact with each other and share a set of beliefs—that is, share a culture—make up the basic features of a society. A society reflects an association of individuals that makes human behavior and relationships between individuals somewhat predictable and that enables members to solve problems. By predictable, we mean that human behavior within a society is patterned and can be discussed in terms of several interrelated parts. The size of the association of individuals ca

Fashion in Balzac’s Paris

Valerie Steele

Source: Paris Fashion. A Cultural History, 3rd Edition, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

La toilette est l’expression de la société.

Superhero cosplay

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

re-enactmentThe notion of a fan has moved beyond “older ideas of media spectatorship” that involve little more than direct consumption of a cultural artifact (Flemming, 2007, p. 16). participatory fandomParticipatory fandom involves tangential activities which expand upon the fictional world and blur boundaries with reality. “Fans create a fan culture with its own systems of production and distribution that forms . . . a ‘shadow cultural economy’ that lies outside that of the cultural industries

Traje De Crioula: Representing Nineteenth-Century Afro-Brazilian Dress

Aline T. and Monteiro Damgaard

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

This chapter examines representations of Afro-Brazilian dress from nineteenth-century Brazil with the aim of examining the traje de crioula’s origin, formation and influence. The research includes comparative analysis of a broad range of nineteenth-century visual representations and written descriptions alongside analysis of surviving garments currently held in museum collections, and their subsequent interpretation and display. To present a case study for this chapter, a sample of four images is

Hermès

Lauren Bowes

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

All Out in the Wash: Convict Stain Removal in the Narryna Heritage Museum’s Dress Collection

Jennifer Clynk and Sharon Peoples

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

This study extends historian Stefan Petrow’s 2009 study of the convict stain and Narryna by suggesting ways in which its effects can be overcome or reinterpreted, especially in relation to dress. The metaphor of the convict stain relates to a social stigma dating from the 1840s, when anti-transportationists in VDL began a fierce political and moral campaign against convict transportation to the colony. The stain metaphor was a nineteenth-century term applied by historians from the 1850s through t

The Fashion Consumer

Jay Diamond, Ellen Diamond and Sheri Litt

Source: Fashion Retailing. A multi-channel approach, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Traditionally, fashion merchants have used numerous standard measurements to identify their target markets. Included are buying motives, assessment theories, consumer analysis methodology, and so forth.

The Art of Dress: Conformity and Individuality

Joanne B. Eicher and Sandra Lee Evenson

Source: The Visible Self. Global Perspectives on Dress, Culture, and Society, 4th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

At the conclusion of this chapter, you will be able to:

Dress, Culture, and Society

Joanne B. Eicher and Sandra Lee Evenson

Source: The Visible Self. Global Perspectives on Dress, Culture, and Society, 4th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

At the conclusion of this chapter, you will be able to:

Vintage: Fashioning Time

Heike Jenss

Source: Fashioning Memory. Vintage Style and Youth Culture, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

vintage clothesAn early usage of the word vintage in the context of clothing can be found in American Vogue (magazine)Vogue. In the rubric “Smart Fashions for Limited Incomes” in the September 1913 issue, the writer offers “Several Ruses for Disguising the Vintage of Last Year’s Wardrobe,” to make an up-to-date appearance with clothes that survive from past seasons. This includes hands-on advice on updating the “tailoringtailor suit of last year’s vintage” with a “new, upsloping belt” so the suit

Philadelphia Nightlife, Nostalgia and Popular Culture

Alphonso D. McClendon

Source: Fashion and Jazz. Dress, identity and subcultural improvisation, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

vaudeville entertainmentsminstrel entertainmentAlthough New Orleans, New York and Chicago flourished with neighborhoods of jazz including Storyville, Harlem and the South Side correspondingly, Philadelphia, jazz cityPhiladelphia is a setting where innovators and establishments shaped a noteworthy history. The documentation of entertainment outlets was evidenced at the end of the first decade. From 1910 to 1919, society, political and religious groups promoted balls, dances and concerts via the Ph

A Stylish History of Jazz: 1900–1960

Alphonso D. McClendon

Source: Fashion and Jazz. Dress, identity and subcultural improvisation, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

jazzorigins ofNew Orleansslave performancesBechet, Sidneyon slave performances/New Orleansartinfluence of AfricanAfrican ritualsAfrican art/dressDecades before the Civil War, a gathering of inspired people seeking self-determination initiated the birth of a musical genre that flourished throughout America. Congo SquareCongo Square in New Orleans, Louisiana is the highly renowned ground where slaves gathered for spiritual communion on free Sunday. By 1800, these assemblies swelled to six hundred i

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