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Camouflage on the Catwalk

Ariel Beaujot

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The camouflage pattern that is so ubiquitous in Western clothing styles was developed to hide machinery during World War I; it only became a pattern for clothing for troops in World War II. “Camo” is key for war because it helps items blend into the background and it disrupts the shape of forms. Largely because of Army Surplus Stores, camo became a pattern used in street fashion in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. The meaning of camo in this period varied from antiwar protest to a reconnection with n

Stephen Sprouse, Fall/Winter 1988

Lorynn Divita

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Stephen Sprouse was a pioneer in merging street style and high fashion. During his early career at Halston, he was drawn to the downtown New York punk scene. Working with Keith Haring, Jean-Michel Basquiat, and Andy Warhol, his fall/winter collection of 1988 had all of the hallmarks of a Sprouse collection, with Day-Glo fabrics, sheath dresses, and bold graffiti prints. It was also Sprouse’s last collection for a decade. Stephen’s career flourished again at the end of his life thanks to his famou

Red or Dead

Elizabeth Kutesko

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Anna Sui

Elizabeth Kutesko

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Marithé + François Girbaud (house)

Sandra J. Ley

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Photographing Street Style: Bill Cunningham and Beyond

Brent Luvaas

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Whether started by New York Times photographer Bill Cunningham, or extending much further back, street-style photography has become an increasingly influential medium within the global fashion industry, with hundreds of bloggers now documenting the real-time trends of “real people” throughout the globe. But as the breadth and influence of street style grew between the 1970s and the mid-2000s, its practitioners stuck steadfastly to a set of common photographic conventions, investing street style w

Street Style: A Brief History

Brent Luvaas

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Over the last couple of decades, the meaning of the term “street style,” both within and outside of the fashion industry, has shifted profoundly from a description of the urban subcultural styles that emerged out of “the street” to those ordinary—but still stylish—forms of dress worn by “real people” in their everyday lives, to, finally, just another genre of fashion photography that captures the looks of fashion insiders outside runway shows. This article provides a brief history of the concept

Marc Jacobs, Spring/Summer 1995

Hayley-Jane Mazières

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

When the American designer Marc Jacobs appeared on New York’s fashion scene, in 1986, after graduating from the Parsons School of Design, he promptly attracted the attention of the fashion press, which praised his playful yet sophisticated streetwear. During his appointment as Perry Ellis’s creative director from 1988, he dared to launch a groundbreaking grunge collection in 1992—the press loved it; Perry Ellis executives loathed it—and he was publicly suspended from his assignment. Nonetheless,

Skinheads

Else Skjold

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The skinhead style emerged in the 1960s in London as a fusion between “rude boy” style and “mod” style, and is as such a subgenre of the working-class street style that emerged after World War II. The name of the style refers to the characteristic shaved hairdo, which is often associated with racism and violence. But actually, the style is a characteristic example of the bridging between black and white cultures that goes back decades, even hundreds of years, in Western menswear. Stylistically, i

Ray Petri

Rebecca Straub

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

An influential stylist before the term was coined, Ray Petri (born 1948, Scotland) created images of youth culture at a moment when street style first entered the realm of commercialization and mass consumption. Working for publications like The Face and i-D, he cast a diverse group of teens rather than trained models to usher in a new age of fashion imagery. Pouty boys painted orange appear in button-down denim and ski caps—one of his many subversive takes on sportswear—to create a new look cut

1970s Style: Key Themes and Trends

Jo Turney

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The 1970s established fashion as performance, an element of cultures of display in which the street became catwalk (and vice versa), fusing fashion with media such as music, dance, film, and art. It was a decade of imagination and individuality, resulting from newfound social and personal freedoms (Tom Wolfe dubbed it the “Me” decade) which combined with a sartorial knowingness created a new confidence in the presentation of the self—anything was possible and the only limits were of one’s imagina

Placing Tokyo on the Fashion Map: From Catwalk to Street Style

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: Fashioning Japanese Subcultures 2012

Book chapter

After a long period of isolation from foreign and neighboring countries, Japan opened its doors and moved toward Westernization during the Meiji era (1868–1912). This was a period of radical economic, social, and political reforms. The emperor supported and encouraged the modernization and military buildup of Japan. The government’s new slogan was “Civilization and Enlightenment,” following Western patterns. The most visible transformation was seen in clothes. This new cultural phenomenon, a shif

On Cutting and Pasting: The Art and Politics of DIY Streetwear

Brent Luvaas

Source: DIY Style. Fashion, Music and Global Digital Cultures 2012

Book chapter

Now is the era of cut and paste.

On Site and Sound: Music and Borders in a DIY World

Brent Luvaas

Source: DIY Style. Fashion, Music and Global Digital Cultures 2012

Book chapter

Kita tak kenal Pancasila. Kita hanya kenal Punkasila.

Conclusion: The Indie Mainstream

Brent Luvaas

Source: DIY Style. Fashion, Music and Global Digital Cultures 2012

Book chapter

Support Your Local Brand Revolution!

Sweden

Ulla Brück

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Historically there are several indications of an urge to follow fashion in Sweden, although changes were slow. During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries medieval and Renaissance traits still dominated. In the eighteenth century, two-piece dresses for women and breeches and jackets for men became more common. Sweden has numerous varieties of provincial folk dress. Some consider these to be historic items, with strong local identification, while others see them as inventions of nineteenth-cent

Peacock Revolution Legacy: American Men’s Fashion in the 1970s

Daniel Delis Hill

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The 1960s peacock revolution in young men’s dress had developed as a visual expression of the young men’s rejection of the conformist, traditional values of their parents and Establishment authorities. Long hair, hiphugger pants, see-through shirts, protest street looks, Nehru jackets, colorful scarves, and love beads had been alarming to the America’s elders. But by the beginning of the 1970s, the once radical looks had become so commercialized by the fashion industry, pop culture, advertising,

Subcultural and Alternative Dress in Australia

Glynis Jones

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands 2010

Encyclopedia entry

From the beginning of European settlement in New South Wales in 1788, Australians were using alternative forms of dress, body decoration, and modification, visibly expressing individual and collective identities, aesthetic codes, values, beliefs, and cultural experiences different from the dominant culture. Some developed personal style statements, and others have been part of collective subcultural expressions linked to interests, lifestyles, and philosophies. Most have been youth-generated, chi

Fashion Variations

Susan Kaiser and Ryan Looysen

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

For the last fifty years or so, a central debate in fashion studies has centered around the influence of minority, subcultural, and street styles on high and mainstream fashion. Are these styles outside the realm of fashion? Or is fashion a process of complex negotiation that includes such styles, providing fashion variations for different groups? Among the names assigned to these styles are antifashion, oppositional style, and alternative style. However, these terms all require an opposite again

The Fashion Industry

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The origin of garment making is traceable to when humans started covering their bodies. Western clothes changed from the unconstructed dress of the ancient Mediterranean world to the more structured garments of the late Middle Ages. Western apparel became more intricate, requiring increasingly specialized skills for its construction. Before the Industrial Revolution that began in England in the latter half of the eighteenth century, making clothes was an arduous task, and quality garments were an

Cosplay

Frenchy Lunning

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Cosplay, short for “costume play,” refers to a global practice of building costumes and performing as characters from manga (Japanese comic books), anime (Japanese animation), and other popular sources. Cosplay is also a Japanese subculture, whose performance venue is more public than fan conventions. The term came into usage as the influx of Japanese anime and manga became significant at science fiction and comic book conventions. However, anime- and manga-based cosplay differ from that of scien

Trends

Maria Mackinney-Valentin

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

One of the defining features of fashion can be said to be the constant change in its visual expression. The term trend is often employed to describe the motor that drives fashion; it can refer to both fashion change (innovation) and fashion adoption behavior (diffusion). A trend may involve a certain item of dress, a way of wearing an item, or a certain style, silhouette, material, color, or pattern. In fashion theory, fashion process and fashion cycle are sometimes used as synonyms for trend.

Individualizing Japanese Student Uniforms

Brian J. McVeigh

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In some cultures, sociopolitical environments encourage theatricality, rituality, and selves that are self-consciously performed, so that the bifurcation of the self into genuine expressions and social masks is more salient. The reasons behind this “splitting of the self” vary from place to place and from period to period. In any case, the need to separate the personal self from the public persona, backstage orchestrations from front-stage performances, and behind-the-curtains from before-the-foo

Hispanic and Latino American

Josephine M. Moreno

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The heritage of Latinos living in the United States and Canada is a mixture of Spanish, Portuguese, European, Native, African, Asian, and other ancestry. Dress needs vary widely and are influenced in part by socioeconomic status, age, income, education, immigration status, faith, popular culture, and gender. Family values and faith play a significant role in Hispanic families and influence dress purchases, particularly for special occasion wear. Latinos also tend to be brand-conscious. Although a

Subcultural Dress

David Muggleton and Dunja Brill

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

A subculture can be defined as a group with particular shared cultural features that distinguish it clearly from other subcultures and both the specific milieu (parent culture) and wider society (dominant culture) from which it emerges. The definition of culture on which this notion of a subculture is based is borrowed from anthropology and is taken to mean a whole way of life of a society or particular section thereof, depending on the level of analysis. A subculture can therefore be seen as a d

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