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Wearing Ethnic Identity: Power of Dress

Uradyn E. Bulag

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

From the earliest written records, dress in China has been used to signify a political order and to mark the boundary between civilization and barbarity. China has gone through scores of dynastic changes, each producing distinct dress codes. For more than half of its history, part or all of China has been conquered and ruled by Inner Asian pastoral nomads; as a result, the history of dress in China is fraught with identity problems. Chinese civilizational imperatives dictate that the people of a

Overview of Korea: Traditional

Lee Kyung Ja

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The basic styles of hanbok, or Korean traditional dress, were established at a very early date and have remained essentially unchanged to the present day. The styles developed among steppe nomadic cultures and were introduced to the Korean peninsula probably during the first century b.c.e. Mural paintings from the walls of Goguryeo kingdom (37 b.c.e. to 668 c.e.) tombs dating from the late fourth to the sixth centuries c.e. show clearly the early forms of male and female dress: Men wear baji, or

Historical Evidence: Korea

Seongsil Park

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Chinese neo-Confucianism was adopted by Emperor Taejo (1335–1408), the founder of the Joseon dynasty (1392–1910). Society, including dress, was carefully regulated. Members of the court were classified into nine ranks. Gwanbok, or official dress, included separate wardrobes for court ceremonials, religious rites, and official and ordinary work, and there were rigorous sumptuary laws. In addition to pictorial and written documentation, there are numerous examples of garments and accessories as evi

International Fashion in East Asia

John E. Vollmer

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The activities of Western merchants, missionaries, and adventurers have been recorded in Chinese historical literature since the Tang dynasty (618–907), but not until the sixteenth century did Western dress became a factor in the region’s history. Gradually, Western customs, including clothing, came to be considered essential components of modernization. World War II and its aftermath accelerated the adoption of Western dress in East Asia. In most places national or regional dress is now deemed “

Body Modification: Tattooing

Mieko Yamada

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Tattooing is a type of body adornment inscribed on the skin. In East Asia, where Confucianism strongly influences many cultures, there are multiple meanings of the tattooing practice: cosmetic purposes, social status, tribal customs, criminal association, and crime punishment. However, Confucian doctrine claims that bodies are given to people by their parents and that intentionally hurting bodies is contrary to the Confucian concept of filial piety. Therefore, although tattooed bodies are acknowl

Confucianism Manifested in Korean Dress from the Sixteenth to Seventeenth Centuries

Inwoo Chang and Haekyung L. Yu

Source: Undressing Religion. Commitment and Conversion from a Cross-Cultural Perspective 2000

Book chapter

The basic garments in Korean traditional dress consist of two pieces, a top and a bottom. The top is a caftan-style jacket or blouse called jogori. Both men and women wear jogori regardless of age and socio-economic status. With jogori men wear pants called baji, and women wear skirts called chima. On top of these basic garments, people can wear a variety of po (coat or robe-type outer wear) depending on the weather and occasion. In addition to these basic garments, there are several important ce

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