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Indonesia, Republik DIY

Brent Luvaas

Source: DIY Style. Fashion, Music and Global Digital Cultures 2012

Book chapter

Since gaining independence from the Dutch in 1949, the sprawling island nation of Indonesia has been, and continues to be, a decidedly tenuous union. Spread across some 17,000 islands in the South Pacific, the Indian Ocean, and the South China Sea, Indonesia is a country of incredible cultural, regional, and biological diversity. Its 233 million people, divided into more than two hundred distinct ethnic groups, practice an immense assortment of religions, from Hinduism to Protestantism and animis

DIY Capitalism: Class, Crisis, and the Rise of Indie Indonesia

Brent Luvaas

Source: DIY Style. Fashion, Music and Global Digital Cultures 2012

Book chapter

It’s not just a fashion, it’s Indonesian creative movement!!

DIY in DIY (Daerah Istimewa Yogyakarta): Everyday Production in the Indonesian Indie Scene

Brent Luvaas

Source: DIY Style. Fashion, Music and Global Digital Cultures 2012

Book chapter

All the industries in Bandung emerged out of hanging out at first. The pioneers (of the indie scene) emerged out of the hangout spots…And it’s still like that to this day.

DIY Chic: Notes on Indie Style

Brent Luvaas

Source: DIY Style. Fashion, Music and Global Digital Cultures 2012

Book chapter

Be an original in a land full of fakes and duplicates.

On Cutting and Pasting: The Art and Politics of DIY Streetwear

Brent Luvaas

Source: DIY Style. Fashion, Music and Global Digital Cultures 2012

Book chapter

Now is the era of cut and paste.

On Site and Sound: Music and Borders in a DIY World

Brent Luvaas

Source: DIY Style. Fashion, Music and Global Digital Cultures 2012

Book chapter

Kita tak kenal Pancasila. Kita hanya kenal Punkasila.

Conclusion: The Indie Mainstream

Brent Luvaas

Source: DIY Style. Fashion, Music and Global Digital Cultures 2012

Book chapter

Support Your Local Brand Revolution!

Sarong

Heidi Boehlke

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The sarong was the dress of the seafaring peoples of the Malay Peninsula near Sumatra and Java; according to Gittinger, it was subsequently introduced on the island of Madura and along the north coast of Java. In the late nineteenth century, an observer recorded its absence in the Java interior. Early sea traders in these waters were Moslems from India, and Islam spread from the coastal areas, so it is thought that these early sarongs may have been woven plaids, which were associated with Moslem

Jewelry in Indonesia

Jasleen Dhamija

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The vast Indonesian archipelago is a chain of 13,667 islands. The Indonesians call their country Tanah Air Kita, “our homeland,” literally “our land and water.” The nation comprises 365 ethnic and tribal groups, each with its own language, cultural traditions, beliefs, ritual observations, and social norms. Thus, throughout the archipelago, a large number of cultural expressions have evolved over the millennia, many of which are still in use in the early twenty-first century. Even small islands h

Indonesia

Itie van Hout

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Diverse cultural elements have shaped the Indonesian archipelago, changing dress traditions. Before weaving was known, leaves, plant fibers, and barkcloth were used for clothing. Cotton, not native to Indonesia, may have arrived from India. Early clothing probably consisted of loincloths and hip wrappers. Later dress, particularly ceremonial, comprised layers of clothing. Textiles, imbued with magical qualities, were crucial to relationships between the supernatural and human worlds. By the seven

Rites of Passage and Rituals in Indonesia

Marianne Hulsbosch

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Indonesian archipelago stretches a distance of more than three thousand miles (about five thousand kilometers) along the equator, across three time zones, and has a population in excess of 200 million, comprising more than 350 ethnic groups. These features make it impossible to consider Indonesia as a single society with common linguistic links, shared values, and ideologies. Therefore, it would be a mistake to make generalizations about ceremonial and ritualistic meaning of Indonesian textil

Colonial Influence on the Sarong and Kain in Java

Marianne Hulsbosch

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The sarong, a tubular stitched cloth, and the kain, a rectangular cloth, are iconic items in the Indonesian dress lexicon. Both the single rectangular cloth and the tubular cloth are lengths of material that are woven in Indonesia and decorated with ethnic-specific motifs. Men and women drape and pleat a sarong or kain around the body; men drape the kain counterclockwise, and women drape it clockwise. The centrality of all aspects of textiles and the abundance of designs have made cloth a highly

Cross-Dressing in Indonesia

Marianne Hulsbosch

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In Indonesia cross-dressing is a complex phenomenon, distinct from cross-dressing in Western societies. In Indonesia it often forms part of rituals, festivities, and sociocultural roles; there are several gender types besides the commonly understood male–female division. The most recognized is waria, male individuals displaying characteristics normally considered female and thought to have a “woman’s soul”; they are often associated with popular entertainment. Waria see themselves as assuming fem

The Sarong Kebaya of Singapore, Malaysia, and Indonesia

Chor Lin Lee

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The epical images on bas-reliefs of Javanese classical monuments such as Prambanan and Borobudur suggest that the courts of central Java preserved many facets of ancient society. Dress was one of them. Outside the ritual-bound context of these courts, dress changed dramatically. During the Hindu-Buddhist era (eighth to fourteenth centuries), women dressed predominantly in a style largely influenced by the Indian sojourners: Their shoulders were bare, their chests were wrapped in a continuous piec

Indonesian Indie (DIY) Fashion

Brent Luvaas

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Derived from independent, the term indie refers to music, film, fashion, or any other creative medium produced and distributed on a small scale, often by the artists themselves, outside of established commercial channels. In Indonesia, the world’s fourth most populous nation, spread out over some seventeen thousand islands in Southeast Asia and Oceania, the moniker has recently been taken on by hundreds of young fashion designers. These designers are turning away from both international couture a

The Fashion World of Southeast Asia

Edric Ong

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Each nation of the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) since independence has been asserting its identity through dress. Many of these nations are multicultural, creating interesting blends, including Western styles. Contemporary Malaysian fashion reflects its people’s cultural diversity. Young Muslim girls wear jeans with head scarves rather than traditional dress. Batik textiles are undergoing a major revival, promoted by the Malaysian government. In Indonesia, designers have done m

Ethnic Dress and Adornment of the Dayaks of Sabah, Sarawak, and Kalimantan

Edric Ong

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Colonizers used the term Dayak for non-Islamic indigenous peoples of Borneo, divided into Sarawak and Sabah, the two East Malaysian states, and Kalimantan in Indonesia and Brunei. It is less used now, as ethnic groups wish to be identified by their own names. The oral history of the indigenous peoples of Sarawak, Sabah, and Kalimantan is rich in myths closely related to textiles, dress, and ornaments. The Iban, comprising 30 percent of the state’s population, have one of the richest textile tradi

Colonial Influence on Dress in Indonesia

Itie van Hout

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The Indonesian archipelago, comprising approximately seventeen thousand islands, has a sea area three times larger than its land area. Indonesia is situated at the heart of a vast trading network between China, India, the Middle East, and Europe. From prehistoric times, cultures in this region were formed and transformed through interregional contacts, migration, and contacts with cultures from afar. Thus a continued merging and layering of cultural elements characterized the area. The western co

Batik Dress of Java

Maria Wronska-Friend

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Batik—a wax-resist dyeing technique used to produce a range of traditional garments, is a prominent feature of Javanese culture. Each of the major ethnic groups living on the island—Javanese, Sundanese, Chinese, Eurasian, and Arab, used batik textiles as markers of their identity and social status, which resulted in the development of several regional and ethnic styles. At the same time complex iconography, rich symbolic language, and the high accomplishment required to produce many of these text

School Uniforms as a Symbolic Metaphor For Competing Ideologies in Indonesia

Linda B. Arthur

Source: Undressing Religion. Commitment and Conversion from a Cross-Cultural Perspective 2000

Book chapter

In a metaphorical sense, dress and dressing are themes relevant to a wider set of related phenomena. Nation-states dress themselves not only through uniforms, but also by way of architecture, street names, postage stamps, monuments and rituals (Nordholt, 1997).

Continuation and Change in Tenganan Pegeringsingan, Bali

L. Kaye Crippen and Patricia M. Mulready

Source: Undressing Religion. Commitment and Conversion from a Cross-Cultural Perspective 2000

Book chapter

Crippen conducted this investigation from 1985 to 1999; she attended the key days of the fifth month ceremony almost every year. She used triangulated methods for data collection, including a review of the written literature, oral history, in-depth interviews, participant and pictorial observation of religious and cultural ceremonies, review of pictorial documentation and case studies.

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