Results: Text (4) Images (0)

You searched for

Modify your search terms or add filters

Filtered by

Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 4 of 4 (1 pages)
    Page 1 of 1
The Sarong Kebaya of Singapore, Malaysia, and Indonesia

Chor Lin Lee

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The epical images on bas-reliefs of Javanese classical monuments such as Prambanan and Borobudur suggest that the courts of central Java preserved many facets of ancient society. Dress was one of them. Outside the ritual-bound context of these courts, dress changed dramatically. During the Hindu-Buddhist era (eighth to fourteenth centuries), women dressed predominantly in a style largely influenced by the Indian sojourners: Their shoulders were bare, their chests were wrapped in a continuous piec

Chinese Dress in Singapore

Chor Lin Lee

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Singapore developed into a multicultural pluralistic society by the second half of the nineteenth century, so it would be hard to imagine the Chinese community there to be homogeneous. Two distinctive Chinese communities could be identified, depending on their levels of familiarity with Singapore and hence Southeast Asia and the length of their association there—the Peranakan (native-born, or Straits Chinese) and the sinkeh (newcomers). The way women from these Chinese communities dressed was ill

The Fashion World of Southeast Asia

Edric Ong

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Each nation of the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) since independence has been asserting its identity through dress. Many of these nations are multicultural, creating interesting blends, including Western styles. Contemporary Malaysian fashion reflects its people’s cultural diversity. Young Muslim girls wear jeans with head scarves rather than traditional dress. Batik textiles are undergoing a major revival, promoted by the Malaysian government. In Indonesia, designers have done m

Veiling and Unveiling: Reconstructing Malay Female Identity in Singapore

Joseph Stimpfl

Source: Undressing Religion. Commitment and Conversion from a Cross-Cultural Perspective 2000

Book chapter

Malays are a Muslim people indigenous to Southeast Asia who have a tradition of subsistence based on farming and fishing. Malay residence is traditionally in a village (kampung). Malay villages are usually structured around the practice of Islam expressed through local custom (adat). Each village has a common prayer site (surau or mesjid) and is hierarchical in structure with a village headman (ketua). Traditional behavior offers respect to a political hierarchy outside the kampung but resists ou

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 4 of 4 (1 pages)
Page 1 of 1