Results: Text (24) Images (0)

You searched for

Modify your search terms or add filters

Filtered by

Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 24 of 24 (1 pages)
    Page 1 of 1
Hispanic and Latino American

Josephine M. Moreno

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The heritage of Latinos living in the United States and Canada is a mixture of Spanish, Portuguese, European, Native, African, Asian, and other ancestry. Dress needs vary widely and are influenced in part by socioeconomic status, age, income, education, immigration status, faith, popular culture, and gender. Family values and faith play a significant role in Hispanic families and influence dress purchases, particularly for special occasion wear. Latinos also tend to be brand-conscious. Although a

The Southwest

Nancy J. Parezo

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The American Southwest and northwestern Mexico compose a culture area that is called the Greater Southwest, which since 1848 has been divided by two modern nation-states and influenced by each nation’s history, policy, and attire. As the arid homeland to a wealth of both well-known and little-known cultures, the Southwest has expressed a rich and varied history of attire, defined by both lifestyles and cultures. Based on a basic desert adaptation of prepared animal hide and woven fiber attire, wh

Latin American Fashion

Regina A. Root

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Zinacantán Indigenous Fashion

Yosi Anaya

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

The textiles of Chiapas, Mexico’s most southerly state, are prized as ranking among the finest products of Mexican weaving. Each locality has its particular style, the focus of this article being on the textiles of the Tzotzil community of Zinacantán in Chiapas. The textiles used by Chiapas peoples have also undergone intense development and are proudly worn in the villages and outside. This is particularly the case in Zinacantán. For centuries the Zinacantecs favored austere, apparently anonymou

Contemporary Veracruz Textiles

Yosi Anaya

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

In the panorama of indigenoustextiles of Veracruz, the Mexican state with the third largest native population, key items make up indigenous dress. The changing status of their survival, continuance, renovation, mutations, and incorporations is evident through varying factors, shifting tastes, and historical and contemporary social pressures. Indigenous dress, or arte popular (popular art/people’s art), is becoming less and less visible in its communities of origin, mostly falling into disuse desp

Film and Fashion

Alba F. Aragón

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Attempting a full account of film and fashion in the two dozen nations of Latin America is a daunting task. The mere concept of regional and even national cinemas in Latin America is subject to debate, while the question of what Latin American fashion is has only begun to be addressed by scholars. The development of film in Latin America has been uneven and multifaceted. Often, films produced in Latin America have been purveyors of foreign fashion trends. Occasionally, they have sought to documen

Dress in Mexican Cinema

Isabel Arredondo

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Despite Mexico’s ethnic and social diversity, Mexican films, especially those made during the classical period (1936–1957), propose a unified cultural identity around the notion of mestizo or mixed-race origin. Mestizo culture is the backbone of Fernando de Fuentes’s Vámonos con Pancho Villa (1935) and Allá en el rancho grande (1936), for instance, while in Emilio “El Indio” Fernández’s Flor Silvestre (1943) and María Candelaria (1943), indigenous dress is stripped of its cultural specificity and

Mexican Headwear

Beverly Chico

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Within the territory known as Mexico, there existed a dramatic division between headwear worn by indigenous tribes prior to, and then after, the Spanish conquest of the 1500s. This sudden break was most evident when huge feathered headdresses worn by the ruling elite Aztec and Maya kings and warriors disappeared, to be replaced by European wigs and plumed hats on Spanish government officials, tall miters for Roman Catholic Church hierarchy, and metallic helmets on soldier-conquistadors. The desig

The China Poblana

Virginia Davis

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

As mestiza (female of mixed race) dress in Mexico evolved from the seventeenth century onward, the red, green, and white china poblana outfit emerged from china poblana folk dress. This is now the female counterpart of the male charro (horseman) costume. These both became fiesta and dance wear, being regarded as an expression of national identity. Poblana is an adjective usually meaning: from the city/state of Puebla, although the word can also refer to a rural background. The term china derives

Used Clothing

Mélissa Gauthier

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Although not new, the global circulation of secondhand clothing from the West to the Third World has expanded rapidly over the past two decades. The United States is the world’s largest exporter of used clothing, American exports having grown significantly since the late twentieth century. Different countries subject imported American secondhand clothing to various trade policies, from liberalization to protectionist. A recent review by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (

Zapotec Clothing in Oaxaca

Grace Johnson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

The geographical setting of Oaxaca, except for narrow coastal strips, consists of mountainous zones with isolated peaks, broken by numerous deep canyons, valleys, and basins. The less rugged areas form the major concentrated settlement areas. The great variety of terrain, cultures, and languages make Oaxaca (a southern state of Mexico) one of the most complex regions in the country. In the past, the high mountains and difficulties of communication perpetuated the isolation of the people of Oaxaca

Sna Jolobil: A Textile Cooperative

Kathryn Klein

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

While the ancient Maya tradition of backstrap loom weaving and the wearing of traditional clothing had continued for millennia, the quality of handwoven work had waned by the early 1970s, as it had in many other areas of the world. With a keen interest in Maya textile traditions, two young businessmen, Walter F. Morris Jr. (Chip) of the United States and Pedro Meza Meza of the Maya town of Tenejapa, Chiapas, initiated what was to become the Sna Jolobil (The House of the Weaver) weaving cooperativ

Folklore Influences in Mexico and Panama

Tasha Lewis

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Appliqué and related techniques in apparel styles are representative of Mexico’s and Panama’s culture and identity. Panamanian molas, made by the Kuna Indians of Panama, were originally worn as blouses by the women. Today, molas and mola art are sold as tapestries, tote bags, and Western-styled blouses. Mexican appliqué has a long tradition in many of the nation’s traditional or folkloric dress styles, which many tourists may associate with the country. Modern-day designs using appliqué, embroide

Ancient Maya

Matthew Looper

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

The Maya civilization, particularly during the Classical period (250–900 c.e.), provides some of the most extensive evidence for dress in the ancient Americas. Sculpted, modeled, and painted images portray the rituals and myths surrounding prestigious status. Generally, only durable materials survive. Elite burials provide the most significant remains; there is considerably more information on prestigious ritual dress than on clothing in other contexts. Maya dress generally changed little, and ma

Maya Dress and Fashion in Chiapas

Ashley E. Maynard and Patricia Marks Greenfield

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

A transition has taken place in Maya communities in highland Chiapas, Mexico, from a few traditional, defined patterns for each article of clothing to the concept of fashion, with its traits of change and innovation. This transition to fashion occurred as the communities moved from a subsistence and agriculture economy to one based on money and commerce. A notable example is Nabenchauk, a hamlet in Zinacantán, where research has been conducted by cultural psychologist Patricia Greenfield since 19

Visualizing Difference: The Rhetoric of Clothing in Colonial Spanish America

Mariselle Meléndez

Source: The Latin American Fashion Reader 2005

Book chapter

Walter Mignolo observes that the lack of writing along with the lack of clothing and cannibalism constituted three crucial elements often used in the construction of Amerindian images: “Not having it yet or having it in excess were two cognitive moves used by Europeans in constructing the identity of the self-same by constructing at the same time, the image of the other” (Mignolo 1992: 312). Written as well as visual texts usually contrasted the nakedness of the indigenous people with the presenc

Mixtec Hairstyles

Holly Parker

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

In current Western society, the hairstyle that a person chooses is a reflection of the personality of the individual who wears it. Other cultures do not necessarily see their hair the same way. In ancient Mixtec culture, religious or social beliefs seem to have been the deciding factor as to the hairstyle that one wore. Ancient Mixtec hairstyles are depicted in the Codices Nuttall and Selden, providing evidence that some aspects of Mixtec hairstyles represent varying levels of status, as well as

The Traveler’s Eye: Chinas Poblanas and European-inspired Costume in Postcolonial Mexico

Kimberly Randall

Source: The Latin American Fashion Reader 2005

Book chapter

Firstly, for a better understanding of the role that fashion played in the early independence period, a brief overview of colonial history and society is necessary. The personal experiences of those who participated in the conquest helped to shape the colonial experience, influencing the generations to come. These first Spanish settlers of Mexico or New Spain as it was known, included groups of lesser gentry, especially those young men who had been cut off from the family fortune by the rules of

Overview of Mexico

Chloë Sayer

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Mexico is one of the richest archaeological zones in the world. Extreme variations of climate and vegetation have influenced human evolution over long periods of time. Stone carvings, terracotta figurines, murals, and painted manuscripts reflect the evolution of the textile arts and show that ancient peoples developed varied styles of clothing and adornment. Highly stratified societies imposed strict clothing restrictions. After the Spanish Conquest of 1519, Spanish settlers introduced new materi

Ixcacles: Maguey-fiber Sandals in Modern Mexico

Pamela Scheinman

Source: The Latin American Fashion Reader 2005

Book chapter

Ixcacles consist of four elements made in a specific order: 1) a foot-shaped sole (la suela ) of three layers of fiber, rolled and doubled over, then stitched tightly in a concentric or horizontal pattern; 2) a rectangular heel guard ( el carcañal or la talonera ), like the back of a shoe, of weft-faced plain weave; 3) a toe band (el puente ) woven over three (or up to ten) warps;Oaxacan sandals had a plied cord loop as a toe thong (la correa or la pata del gallo, i.e, rooster’s claw (see de Avil

Mazahua Dress

Pamela Scheinman

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

People recognize Mazahua dress from the colorful dolls sold on city sidewalks in Mexico, wearing brilliant, Victorian-style satins, silver earrings, and red glass beads. Mazahuas are the poorest Mexican indigenous group and the largest in Mexico City. When Mazahua women became highly visible in the 1960s and 1970s, costume historians generally dismissed their attire as mestizo and generic. In fact, although climate, foreign influences, technology, immigration, and government crafts projects all m

Far Eastern Influences in Latin American Fashions

Araceli Tinajero

Source: The Latin American Fashion Reader 2005

Book chapter

Mixtec Dress

Robert Lloyd Williams

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

The production of textiles and clothing began in Mesoamerica long before the Common Era. Textile production was highly elaborated and was of primary economic and cultural importance. The Mixtec Indians of Oaxaca illustrated their own culturally identifiable clothing types in pictogram books called codices (singular, codex) of which five major examples survive. Mixtec clothing types were also typical of types used by other ethnicities in Mexico and Central America, but with their own culturally di

The Yucatán

Yolanda Garfias Woo

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

The Maya culture covers the Yucatán Peninsula, Chiapas, present-day Belize, Guatemala, northern El Salvador, and Honduras. Documentation describing pre-Hispanic Yucatán clothing includes four ancient Maya codices (books), known today as the Paris, the Madrid, the Dresden, and the Groelier. Maya clothing was both simple and complex, determined by function and class. Men wore loincloths, more elaborate ones for elites, under hip-cloths; the Dresden Codice depicts a long “kilt.” Headdresses were wor

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 24 of 24 (1 pages)
Page 1 of 1