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Pre-Hispanic Dress in Colombia and Ecuador

Karen Olsen Bruhns

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

The northern Andean region is geographically and culturally distinct from the central Andes. The mountains are lower, and much of the land is tropical or subtropical, owing to a wide coastal plain in Ecuador and the north–south river valleys of Colombia, all warm and well-watered. The hot, semiarid plains of the Caribbean and of southern Ecuador must also be taken into account, because it was here that ceramics, agriculture, and the earliest evidence of weaving first appeared in South America. Al

South American Headwear

Beverly Chico

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Two basic factors influence clothing and headwear worn by South Americans; one derives from ancient indigenous cultures, and the other from cultural diffusion resulting from the conquest and colonization by the Spanish and Portuguese. Most South Americans today are of mixed racial heritage. The modern urban population usually wears European- or American-style manufactured clothing and headwear. In more isolated areas, characteristic head coverings are still worn, exemplified in three climate regi

Contemporary Ecuador

Lynn A. Meisch

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Ecuador is a small, geographically and ethnically diverse country of 153,822 square miles (398,397 square kilometers), about the size of Oregon. It has three major geographic regions: the hot and humid Pacific Coast; the rainy, sweltering Oriente or Amazon rain forest; and the cool Andean highlands or sierra. The climates of these regions have influenced dress since earliest times.Most of the population is concentrated in Ecuador’s two largest cities, Guayaquil on the coast and the capital Quito

Visualizing Difference: The Rhetoric of Clothing in Colonial Spanish America

Mariselle Meléndez

Source: The Latin American Fashion Reader 2005

Book chapter

Walter Mignolo observes that the lack of writing along with the lack of clothing and cannibalism constituted three crucial elements often used in the construction of Amerindian images: “Not having it yet or having it in excess were two cognitive moves used by Europeans in constructing the identity of the self-same by constructing at the same time, the image of the other” (Mignolo 1992: 312). Written as well as visual texts usually contrasted the nakedness of the indigenous people with the presenc

The Shuar and Achuar of Ecuador and Peru

Nancy B. Rosoff

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

During the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Shuar and Achuar groups of Ecuador’s eastern Amazonian lowlands made and wore dazzling ornaments that stood out in contrast to the monochrome world of the jungle. The sonorous environment of the forests was enhanced by the tinkling and rhythmic sounds of seed and cut-shell necklaces and belts worn by men and women during dances. Prior to the introduction of trade goods, agricultural gardens and the surrounding forests furnished all the mat

He Gave Her Sandals and She Gave Him a Tunic: Cloth and Weddings in the Andes

Lynn A. Meisch

Source: Wedding Dress Across Cultures 2003

Book chapter

The Inca empire, that extended along the Pacific coast and Andean highlands from northern Argentina and Chile to the southern edge of Colombia, was composed of a multitude of polities and ethnic groups. Our knowledge of Inca customs, including matrimonies, comes primarily from Spanish chronicles, colonial written accounts of the Andean world, which must be read with the knowledge that the descriptions of Inca life were filtered through the eyes of men intent on political control, economic exploit

Why Do They Like Red? Beads, Ethnicity and Gender in Ecuador

Lynn A. Meisch

Source: Beads and Bead Makers. Gender, Material Culture and Meaning 1998

Book chapter

One of the pleasures of attending the weekly markets in highland Ecuador is admiring (or buying) the strands of antique and contemporary beads that are heaped on tables, hung from market stalls or piled on cloths on the ground. The beads are avidly and carefully examined and sometimes bought by indigenous women because beads constitute an essential part of female dress (Figure 7.1). By dress or costume I mean a person’s hairstyle, headgear, clothing, jewellery and other bodily adornment (followin

Ethnic Conflict and Changing Dress Codes: A Case Study of an Indian Migrant Village in Highland Ecuador

Carola

Source: Dress and Ethnicity. Change Across Space and Time 1995

Book chapter

New goods offered by an expanding capitalistic market are fascinating to residents of “traditional” village communities; at least, that is a common finding of many studies on social modernization processes in the so-called Third World. Acquisition of consumer goods presupposes the earning of money. The felt need for these goods is therefore considered one of the most decisive levers for the growing market integration of households which previously produced mostly for their own consumption. What h

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