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Draping Principles and Skills

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Draping principles and skillsDraping is a technique in which DesignDesignersdesigners work with fabric, using a dress form or live model, draping and pinning the pieces together to develop the desired style. Draping is the oldest means of creating clothing. It is an art form in fabric. The techniques by which a designer works to develop a line may vary. Many designers prefer to use draping methods to create their original designs. This is because working with actual materials gives a designer gre

Bodice and Blouse Designs

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Bodice and blouse designsobjectivesBodice and blouse designsThe bodice and blouse designs in this group are kept simple and natural while the fabric is draped with the correct amount of ease and proportion. Projects explore how to release and manipulate the fabric into a design. Each design defines the style and silhouette over the bust, hip, and waist by emphasizing the use of folds, darts, pleats, fullness, empire seams, and halters, and at the same time, not overworking the fabric.

Knit Fabrics

Deborah E. Young

Source: Swatch Reference Guide for Fashion Fabrics, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Knitting is the second major method of constructing a textile. Weaving was invented thousands of years before knitting; knits are relative newcomers. As such, knitting structures borrow a lot of their terms and surfaces from woven fabrics. Notice that some knit fabrics even share the same or similar names as woven fabrics, such as piqués, ribs, and jacquards. It can be quite confusing. In the past decade, the knit market has grown exponentially, taking on a much larger share of the textile market

Specialty Weft Knits

Deborah E. Young

Source: Swatch Reference Guide for Fashion Fabrics, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Interlock (Figure 13.1) is both the simplest of the double knits (made on a double needle bed) and is also a variation of a 1×1 rib knit. Interlock is so closely related to the rib knit that it is often difficult to identify the difference between the two. Effectively, interlock is two jerseys made back-to-back, with wales on both the face and back. For this reason, it is sometimes called a double jersey. This term is somewhat problematic because it does not look like or perform like a jersey. Es

Warp Knits

Deborah E. Young

Source: Swatch Reference Guide for Fashion Fabrics, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Tricot is the simplest of the warp knits. Notice that Swatch 144 has a different face and back, like jersey. In fact, tricot and jersey are made quite similarly. Each is made entirely of knit stitches, with a face of wales and a back of courses. But jersey and tricot are made on different machines and, therefore, do not look or perform the same. Generally, tricot is lighter weight and smoother than jersey because the stitches are smaller, and tricot is usually made of filament yarns. Unlike jerse

Quick Reference Guide Tables

Deborah E. Young

Source: Swatch Reference Guide for Fashion Fabrics, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Draping on the Mannequin

Anette Fischer and Kiran Gobin

Source: Construction for Fashion Design, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

There is a vast range of mannequins available. It is vital before starting with the drape to have a close look at the model stand you are working on. Take measurements and analyze the general shape of the stand to work out if it covers the look and size you are after. In addition, you should have the following tools and equipment to hand before starting to drape.

Pattern Cutting

Anette Fischer and Kiran Gobin

Source: Construction for Fashion Design, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

This is the point at which pattern cutting becomes much more creative and exciting. Once the design has been completed, the process of breathing life into a flat design drawing in order to achieve an actual garment can begin. To be able to achieve a beautiful garment shape takes time and experience. Remember, nothing ever happens without practicing your skills—don’t be disheartened if it doesn’t work first time round. All outstanding fashion designers and creative pattern cutters have worked for

Drapery, Bias, and Cowls

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Draped garments usually involve the direction of fabric called the bias. Fabric is woven with a crosswise and lengthwise direction. The bias is the diagonal direction extending across the grain of the fabric. The bias has a round, very elastic quality. It also has the ability to cling and fall and follow the curves of the body in a very sensual way.

Laying Out, Cutting, and Stitching Knits

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

An L-square ruler and a tape measure are required tools you need for laying out and cutting knits. The remaining tools you need are as follows (see also Figure 4.1):

Getting to Know Knits and Stretch Fabrics

Sharon Czachor

Source: Sewing with Knits and Stretch Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Garments constructed from knitted fabric conform more easily to the shape of the body, reducing the fitting and construction details while retaining the shape. This allows the stretch of the fabric to replace the ease that is needed in designing woven fabric garments. The fitting for garments in stretch fabric is very different from woven fabrics and is addressed at the patternmaking stage. For further information, refer to Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics by Julie Cole (Fairchild Books, 2

Preparing Knits and Stretch Wovens for Stitching

Sharon Czachor

Source: Sewing with Knits and Stretch Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Whether the chosen fabric is a knit or a stretch woven, it’s important to identify the right side and wrong side of the fabric (Figure 4.1a and b). The wrong side of the fabric is where the markings are placed, where interfacing or stabilizers of any kind are placed, and where the construction stitches are sewn. Because of the diversity of fibers used in creating knit fabrics and stretch woven fabrics, the fibers react differently to marking pens, pencils, chalk, or wax marking utensils, even us

Project Five—Photoshop: Stripes and Weaves

Robert Hume

Source: Fashion and Textile Design with Photoshop and Illustrator. Professional Creative Practice, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

In this project you will:

Woven Fabrics (Swatches 28–48)

Ingrid Johnson, Ajoy K. Sarkar and Allen C. Cohen

Source: J. J.Pizzuto’s Fabric Science. Swatch Kit, 11th Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Knitted Fabrics (Swatches 49–69)

Ingrid Johnson, Ajoy K. Sarkar and Allen C. Cohen

Source: J. J.Pizzuto’s Fabric Science. Swatch Kit, 11th Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Fitting Standards in Apparel

Elizabeth Liechty, Judith Rasband and Della Pottberg-Steineckert

Source: Fitting & Pattern Alteration. A Multi-Method Approach to The Art of Style Selection, Fitting, and Alteration, 3rd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Socio-cultural factors influence fit. One culture may teach that good fit means 2 inches of ease in the seat, while another demands 4 inches or more. Still another culture may ban body-conscious silhouettes altogether. Added to that is the fact that fashion trends change with time. Think about skirt hems, as they move from the ankle to mid-calf, to just under the knee, to middle of the knee, thigh high, and higher.

The Skill of Couture Draping

Zoya Nudelman

Source: The Art of Couture Sewing, 2nd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Grainline refers to the orientation of the yarns in a woven fabric. The lengthwise grains run along the length of the fabric and are called the warp yarns. The yarns that are woven in and out perpendicular to the warp yarns are called the weft yarns. These run side to side forming the cross grain of the fabric. The weft yarns are woven to form selvage on both sides of the fabric. The selvage is a finished edge that is formed by the weft yarns being woven, rotating side to side. (Figure 5.2)

Identifying Fashion Fabrics

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: A Guide to Fashion Sewing, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By studying the information in this chapter, the designer will be able to:

Bias and Bias Treatments

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: A Guide to Fashion Sewing, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By studying the information in this chapter, the designer will be able to:

Fabric

Roberto Cabrera and Denis Antoine

Source: Classic Tailoring Techniques for Menswear. A Construction Guide, 2nd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

If you want the very finest fabric for classic tailoring, choose wool. There is an endless variety of beautiful fabrics available to us today, most of which will respond favorably to certain tailoring features. There is no reason to limit your wardrobe to one fabric. However, full tailoring procedures (canvas, haircloth, tape, etc.) will produce their best results for wool. Silk and linen are close seconds.

Woven Fabrics

Ingrid Johnson, Allen C. Cohen and Ajoy K. Sarkar

Source: J.J. Pizzuto’s Fabric Science, 11th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Over 4,000 years ago, man created fabric through the use of a crude wood-framed loom. Typically this weaving device held yarns in an upright position as they were interlaced with one another by hand. Primeval man used this to make fabric to clothe and protect. As civilization began to develop, some woven fabric was used to indicate standing within the community. Eventually, royalty and religious figures used ornately woven fabric to indicate their stature. Looms were also used to depict stories i

Garment Construction Details

Janace E. Bubonia

Source: Apparel Quality. A Guide To Evaluating Sewn Products, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

When it comes to purchasing apparel, consumers look for garments that are flattering on their figure. The way a garment fits is just as important as the styling of the design. Fit is the relationship between the body and the size and styling of a garment. A properly fitting garment should provide a smooth appearance that is free of wrinkling, bulging, or sagging and should effectively function for its intended use to provide comfort for the wearer. A poorly fitting garment can make any design und

Fabric Characteristics and Terms

Helen Joseph-Armstrong

Source: Draping for Apparel Design, 3rd Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Fabric is produced from natural fibers (animal or plant) and synthetic filaments, which are spun, twisted, cured, shrunk, bulked, or manipulated in other ways to achieve yarn for weaving. Fabric structure is the result of a process of being woven, knitted, knotted, or felted to produce yarns that become cloth. Three basic weaves are the basis for all other weaves: plain weave, satin weave, and twill weave.

Cowls

Helen Joseph-Armstrong

Source: Draping for Apparel Design, 3rd Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Cowls can be draped with or without pleats/gathers and with few or many folds. Cowls can fall at varying depths, creating a soft look to any garment. Cowls are designed to fall from the shoulders, neckline, armholes, or waist of dresses, gowns, blouses, pants, jackets, and coats. With the help of a brooch or clip, the cowl can be pulled in any direction to create interesting design effects (see Design b in Figure 1).

Bias Cut Dresses and Twist

Helen Joseph-Armstrong

Source: Draping for Apparel Design, 3rd Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Thanks to the innovative and creative mind of the late designer Madeleine Vionnet (1876– 1975), who was called the “Euclid or Sphinx of Fashion,” bias cut clothing revolutionized the way women wore clothes. To the relief of the fashion world, the girdle was not a part of this new style. The effect of the bias cut dress was dramatic and pleasing to the eye, ever clinging to the natural curves of the figure before falling from the hip into flares at the hemline. The beauty of the bias dress was in

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