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The History of Knitwear

Lisa Donofrio-Ferrezza and Marilyn Hefferen

Source: Designing a Knitwear Collection. From Inspiration to Finished Garments, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Knitting is defined as “the art of interlacing a single thread, in a series of connected loops, by the use of needles to make fabric.”Milton Grass, History of Hosiery (New York: Fairchild, 1955), 104. It's hard to believe that in the third century, hand knitters exclusively used four to five needles rather than the two-needle method, as we know knitting to be. Modern technology uses as many as one thousand computer-controlled needles in one knitting bed alone, sometimes with more than four beds s

Knitting Methods

Lisa Donofrio-Ferrezza and Marilyn Hefferen

Source: Designing a Knitwear Collection. From Inspiration to Finished Garments, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The variety of knitting methods and machines available today is plentiful. The newest technologies and machines are capable of producing complex pattern designs and silhouettes through their ability to increase, decrease, and transfer stitches seamlessly. All weft-knitting machines, whether single-bed, double-bed, or the newer electronic systems with slide beds, have the capacity to knit, tuck, and miss stitches. All of these methods are the techniques used to manipulate loops and stitches in ord

Creating Texture with Pleats, Tucks, Gathers, Ruffles, and Trims

Sharon Czachor

Source: Sewing with Knits and Stretch Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

A variety of knit and stretch woven fabrics used throughout the text have been cut into sample sizes to stitch these techniques. Purchase additional yardage as assigned by the instructor or spurred by curiosity of the designer, ¼ yard minimum. Elastic ⅛″ and ¼″, fusible interfacing, hand sewing thread and needles, and a loop turner are all supplies used in previous chapters. Other supplies will be listed with each technique.

Knitted Fabrics

Ingrid Johnson, Allen C. Cohen and Ajoy K. Sarkar

Source: J.J. Pizzuto’s Fabric Science, 11th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The knitting industry, like the weaving industry, is diverse, creative, and global. While knitting might not be as old a method of producing material as weaving, it is a major type of material in the marketplace. Knitted fabrics are used in a wide range of products, including numerous apparel items, blankets, carpets, upholstery, and sheets. Knit fabrics frequently are used in applications where stretchability, drapability, crease resistance, and wrinkle recovery are needed attributes. Technologi

Knit Fabrics And Their Properties

Virginia Hencken Elsasser

Source: Textiles. Concepts and Principles, 3rd Edition, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

In simplest terms, knitting is the act of interlooping yarn to create fabric, as opposed to weaving, which is the act of interlacing yarns to create fabric. This looping structure contributes to the comfort and easy fit of knit fabrics and is responsible for increasing the popularity of knit apparel. (See CP-5)

Home Production

Tone Rasch

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Clothes are connected to necessity as well as to luxury. The production of them can be viewed the same way. Many clothes have historically been produced at home but in different contexts. Sewing and needlework have been paid work, hobbies, and a part of domestic work during the last couple of centuries. In the early twentieth century, many (if not most) clothes and garments were made at home. This situation has changed, although textiles and clothing are still important parts of housekeeping in t

Approach to knit

Juliana Sissons

Source: Basics Fashion Design 06: Knitwear, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Developments in technology enable new ways of creating knitwear and knitted textiles, but many students and designers are looking to traditional techniques to inspire them and merge with contemporary ideas. Designers are capitalising on the unique qualities that knit has to offer, pushing boundaries with unusual yarns and materials and playing with scale. There is a natural interplay between craft, design and new technology. We will look at some of these traditional knits – fishermen’s ganseys, A

Construction through pattern and texture

Juliana Sissons

Source: Basics Fashion Design 06: Knitwear, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

It is very important to achieve the correct tension when knitting a garment. A tension swatch is vital for knitting a garment to the correct size and fabric quality; it enables you to calculate how many stitches to cast on, how many rows to knit and how many needles are needed to increase or decrease during shaping. If your garment involves lacework or changes of technique within the fabric, these details will need to be knitted into the tension swatch; quite often, many tension swatches are knit

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