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What You Need to Sew and Overlock Knits

Sharon Czachor

Source: Sewing with Knits and Stretch Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In general, the term “laying out the fabric” refers to the positioning of the pattern pieces onto the fabric (Figure 2.1). In production a marker is created that indicates the layout of the pattern pieces and is used as a guide for cutting the fabric for production. The pattern layout can be done manually or on a computer and helps to estimate the amount of yardage required. Pattern pieces are arranged to take into consideration three aspects of the fabric: structure, design, and width. The patt

Stitching Knits with a Sewing Machine

Sharon Czachor

Source: Sewing with Knits and Stretch Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The supplies you will need to stitch samples of various stitches, seams, hems and techniques are a tape measure, scissors, marking utensil, seam ripper. You will also need the following.

The Sewing Machine and Sewing Equipment

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: A Guide to Fashion Sewing, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Pressing is essential to complete a professional-looking garment. Using the correct pressing tools will ensure that all areas are correctly pressed to improve the overall look of the garment.

Seams And Seam Finishes

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: A Guide to Fashion Sewing, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By studying the information in this chapter, the designer will be able to:

The Crinoline Period, 1850–1869

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume. Student Study Guide, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

The Crinoline Period 1850–1870

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The increasing width of women’s skirts had been leading to the use of multiple layers of stiffened petticoats. In September 1856 the editor of Peterson’s Magazine hailed the revival of the 18th-century hoopskirts as a means of holding out these voluminous skirts:

Stitches and Seams

Jaeil Lee and Camille Steen

Source: Technical Sourcebook for Designers, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

Planning

Jennifer Prendergast

Source: Sewing Techniques. An introduction to construction skills within the design process, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

From conception to catwalk, the fashion industry thrives on the energy and buzz of each collection; therefore, adhering to deadlines is important. For all fashion designers, planning and preparation are essential. Prior planning allows the designer to concentrate on the creative process without any distractions. Within the fashion supply chain there are different approaches to planning but in most companies a computerized critical path is used. However, you may wish to use a more simple form, whe

The Apparel Industry

Jan Hilger

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Before the mid-nineteenth century garments were produced manually. With the invention of sewing machines, mass manufacturing became possible. In just over 160 years, business complexity increased from one-man companies, dominated by artisan tailors, to multinational corporations. In Europe and in the United States the first apparel factories following the Fordist model were established. A new unskilled workforce replaced skilled craftsmen. With growing distance from the consumer and decreasing in

Home Production

Tone Rasch

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Clothes are connected to necessity as well as to luxury. The production of them can be viewed the same way. Many clothes have historically been produced at home but in different contexts. Sewing and needlework have been paid work, hobbies, and a part of domestic work during the last couple of centuries. In the early twentieth century, many (if not most) clothes and garments were made at home. This situation has changed, although textiles and clothing are still important parts of housekeeping in t

Technology and Fashion

Phyllis G. Tortora

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Dress in the modern world is made from a wide variety of materials. Generally, the components of dress are created and assembled by some technological process. The development of and advances in technologies used to produce fashionable dress products, however, are rarely viewed as factors related to fashion change. By exploring selected examples that originate from the time of the Industrial Revolution up to the twenty-first century, technological innovations in materials and techniques used to p

Maya Dress and Fashion in Chiapas

Ashley E. Maynard and Patricia Marks Greenfield

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean, 2005, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

A transition has taken place in Maya communities in highland Chiapas, Mexico, from a few traditional, defined patterns for each article of clothing to the concept of fashion, with its traits of change and innovation. This transition to fashion occurred as the communities moved from a subsistence and agriculture economy to one based on money and commerce. A notable example is Nabenchauk, a hamlet in Zinacantán, where research has been conducted by cultural psychologist Patricia Greenfield since 19

Creating Consumers: Gender, Class and the Family Sewing Machine

Nancy Page Fernandez

Source: The Culture of Sewing. Gender, Consumption and Home Dressmaking, 1999, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

During the mid-nineteenth century, urban American women began to participate in new buying activities as the household shifted from a site of production to one of consumption. (Ulrich 1980; Cowan 1983; Jensen 1988; Clark 1990; Boydston 1990) Middle-class women’s increasing consumer roles threatened the ideals of Victorian womanhood and challenged male economic privilege and household authority. (Leach 1984; Peiss 1986) In contrast to the antebellum feminine ideals of piety, purity, domesticity an

Homeworking and the Sewing Machine in the British Clothing Industry 1850–1905

Andrew Godley

Source: The Culture of Sewing. Gender, Consumption and Home Dressmaking, 1999, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

A series of patents granted in the United States in the late 1840s and early 1850s formed the key components of the early sewing machine. The patent owners combined to form a patent-pool from 1856 to 1877, which determined the early structure of the sewing machine manufacturing industry. (Hounshell 1984: 67;Davies 1976: 5–12)The following section is drawn from Godley (1996). The principal manufacturers – Wheeler and Wilson, Willcox and Gibbs, Grover and Baker, and Singer – quickly established the

The Sewing Needle as Magic Wand: Selling Sewing Lessons to American Girls after the Second World War

Eileen Margerum

Source: The Culture of Sewing. Gender, Consumption and Home Dressmaking, 1999, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

India’s silk supply had ceased; any silk that happened to be available was needed instead for parachutes and gunpowder bags. Its substitutes, newly invented nylon and rayon, were needed for aircraft and military clothing. The same was true even of humble cotton, a stable now requisitioned for tents and other heavy military uses. Wool, normally imported from Australia and elsewhere, became very, very tight. (Weatherford 1990: 200)

A Beautiful Ornament in the Parlour or Boudoir: The Domestication of the Sewing Machine

Nicholas Oddy

Source: The Culture of Sewing. Gender, Consumption and Home Dressmaking, 1999, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Immense numbers of the sewing machines are disposed of every week to tailors, clothiers, hosiers, sail-makers etc., and some to private families. The price, £30, will, of course, for the present, place it out of the reach of most of the latter; but that it will one day be an essential article of furniture in every well regulated household we have no doubt.

The Sewing Machine Comes Home

Tim Putnam

Source: The Culture of Sewing. Gender, Consumption and Home Dressmaking, 1999, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Patent disputes among early makers and inventors were a factor inhibiting the expansion of the industry. The agreement known as the ‘Sewing Machine Combination’ concluded this ‘war’ at the end of 1856 and established a common technological platform. The Combination’s decision to license rather than restrict rights represented a belief in the very wide potential dissemination of machines for sewing and an acceptance that design, production and marketing innovation could not be controlled by, or li

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